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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 22, 1929, Image 67

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1929-12-22/ed-1/seq-67/

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OPERATIC FANTASY
ON RADIO TONIGHT
“Hansel and Gretel” Will Be
Presented by Quartet of
Noted Singers.
A pretentious Christmas treat, pre
senting Engelbert Humperdinck's oper
atic fantasy, “Hansel and Gretel,” and
a symphony program with Willem van
Hoogstraaten, world famous director of
symphony orchestras, will be broadcast
tonight by WRC and other N. B. C.
stations.
“Hansel and Gretel" will be presented
by a quartet of noted singers, including
Dorothea Flexer. contralto, who will sing
the part of Hansel; Louise Letch, so
prano, who will be Oretel; Helen Oel
heim, contralto, as the wicked witch,
and Fred Patton, baritone, who appears
in the role of the father. Miss Flexer.
Miss Lerch and Mr. Patton are all of
the Metropolitan Opera Co., while Miss
Oelheim is leading contralto of the
, American Opera Co.
Frank Black s arrangements of new
and old melodies will add color to the
Chase & Sanborn program over WRC
at 8:30 o'clock. A group of popular
radio stars including Mary McCoy, so- j
prano; Welcome Lewis, contralto; |
Frank Luther, tenor, and a male quar- i
tet will assist in the program.
Lawrence to Talk.
Rubinstein's "Romance" is contrasted
with current theme songs from screen
shows in this evening s program which
Jean Goldkette’s Studebaker Cham
pions will offer through WRC at 10:15
o'clock. Other Sunday evening favor
ites offered by WRC include a musical
program by Maj. Edward Bowes Fam
ily, from the Capitol Theater; "Our
Government,” a talk by David Law
rence; Sunday at Seth Parker’s, the j
Russian Cathedral Choir and with a ,
short period of xylophone music by
Sam Herman.
For the Majestic Theater broadcast
Over WMAL and the Columbia Broad
casting System tonight Wendell Hall
has planned several innovations, which
include a group of Christmas melodies
by a duo of violins and a 30-minute
presentation entitled "His Majesty,
King Christmas." The latter is de
signed to give a beautiful explanation
of Christmas against an appropriate
musical background.
Christmas music also is featured on
virtually all of WMAL's afternoon pro
grams with the exception of the News
Reel of the Air which is made up of a
variety of popular and semi-classical !
numbers.
* The Accousticon program in the eve- ;
ning likewise has a Christmas flavor. •
It will be presented by an orchestra
and the Ritz Quartet and a group of
/ vocal soloists. Jesse Crawford in his
weekly organ recital will feature an
unusual arrangement of MacDowells
“To a Wild Rose.”
Arabesque Presentation.
A playet entitled “Mother” will be the
Arabesque presentation. The Back
Home Hour to follow contains a group
of Christmas songs in addition to a
sermon by Rev. Clinton H. Churchill
on “The Birth of Christ.”
Dr. Julius Klein. Assistant Secretary
of Commerce, will give his weekly talk
over WMAL and associated Columbia
stations at 7:45 o’clock. “Helping the
Wholesaler Cut Costs” is the subject.
Gretchen Hood, soprano, will join
Florence Yocum, soprano, and Miss
Paige Burroughs, contralto, in a special
recital of Christmas music for WOL's
major musical feature. The recital will
be followed by a broadcast of the morn
ing service at the First Congregational
Church.
WJSV will broadcast tonight the
service at the First Church of Christ
Scientist in addition to its usual array
of Sunday features, which include a
program by the Ladies’ Choir of Fair
fax, Va.. and a concert by the Gospel
Melody Trio.
SERVICES TO GO ON AIR.
Bethlehem Christmas Ceremony
Will Get National Broadcast.
WMAL and the coast-to-coast net
work of the Columbia Broadcasting
System will broadcast the Christmas
service at Bethlehem Chapel of the
Washington Cathedral Christmas
morning at 11 o’clock.
Rt. Rev. James E. Freeman, Episcopal
bishop of the diocese of Washington,
will preach the sermon. The service
will be conducted by Very Rev. G. C. F.
Bratenahl, dean of Washington. Music
will be provided by the Washington
Cathedral Choir under the direction of
Edgar Priest.
Will Broadcast Game.
Both N. B. C. and C. B. 8. stations
will broadcast the East-West foot ball
game between Army and Stanford
from Palo Alto, Calif, Saturday.
Major “Chain” Features
TODAY.
3:oo—Roxy symphony concert—
WRC and N. B. C. net
work.
4:oo—National Light Opera Co.,
“Marcelle”—WßZ. WBAL,
KSTP. KFAB and WTMJ.
4:oo—Cathedral hour—WMAL
and C. B. S. network.
s:3o—Twilight Voices; vocalists,
women’s octet and orches
tra—WßC and N. B. C.
network.
7:00 —Heroes of the world,
“Alexander the Great”—
WRC and N. B. C. net
i work.
B:oo—Enna Jettick melodies;
mixed quartet and instru
mental ensemble—WJZ,
WBZ. WBAL, WJR, WLW
and others.
1:15 —Collier’s radio hour; dra
• matization with musi
cal interlude—WJZ. WBZ.
KDKA, WLW, WJR and
others.
B:3o—Choral Orchestra: popu
lar program with Phil
Ohman and Victor Arden
—WRC and N. B. C. net
work.
8:00 —Majestic Theater: dra
matic sketch. “His Maj
esty, King Christmas"—
WMAL and C. B. S. net
work.
9:15 —D'Orsay's Parisian ro
mancers: drama, “The
, Christmas Wonder," with
musical background
WJZ. WHAM. WBZ, WJR,
I KDKA. KYW, WHK,
WREN and WCKY.
9:ls—Atwater Kent hour; “Han
sel and Gretel,” by quar
tet of noted singers—
WRC and N. B. C. net
work.
10:45 —Sunday at Seth Parker's:
rural sketch —WRC and
N. B. C. network.
11:00 —Back home hour from
Churchill Tabernacle at
Buffalo WMAL and C.
B. S. network.
NOLAN MOTOR CO.
Always Open
tl 109-1115 18th St. N.W.
Today on the Radio
PROGRAM FOR SUNDAY, DECEMBER 22, 1929.
dieters on left of call letters, kilocycles on right. All time p.m. unleu
otherwise indicated.)
LOCAL STATIONS.
475.9—WMAL—638.
(Washington Radio Forum.)
10:00 to 11:00a—Watch tower service.
2:00—Ballad hour.
2:oo—Symphonic hour.
4:00 —Cathedral hour, sacred music
service.
i s:oo—News reel of the air.
5:30 —Sermon by Rev. Donald Grey
Barnhouse of Philadelphia.
6:oo—Capital Pur Entertainers.
6:3o—Acousticon program.
, 7:oo—Our Romantic Ancestors.
! 7:3o—French trio.
i 7:45 —“The World's Business,” by Dr.
Julius Klein.
B:oo—Correct time.
8:01—La Palina Rhapsodizers.
B:3o—Sonatron program.
9:3o—Majestic Theater of the Air.
10:00—The Royal program, with Jesse
Crawford, organist.
10:30—Arabesque; dramatic sketch.
11:00 to 12:00—Back Home hour.
Early Program Tomorrow.
9:ooa—"Opening the Morning Mail.”
9:3oa—Blue Monday Gloom Chasers.
10:00a—"Radio Home Makers,” by Ida
Bailey Allen.
10:30a—Harmonies and Contrasts.
10:45a—High Gear.
11:00a—The Love Birds.
11:15a—Ben and Helen talk it over.
11:30a—The Children's Corner.
11:45a—The Mixing Bowl.
12:00—Columbia Revue.
12:30—Piano Syncopators.
12:45—Yoeng’s Orchestra.
I:3o—Ambassador Orchestra.
2:oo—Variety program.
3:00 to 3:3o—Columbia Ensemble.
315.6—WRC—960.
(National Broadcasting Co.)
B:ooa—The Sunday Symphonet.
9:00 to 10:00a—Children’s hour.
11:00a—Service from Calvary Baptist
Church; sermon by Rev. Wil
liam S. Abernethy, pastor.
12:30—Metropolitan Echoes.
I:oo—The Nomads.
I:3o—The Pilgrims.
2:oo—Roxy symphony concert.
3:oo—Jewish hour.
4:oo—Service from Washington Cathe
dral; sermon by Right Rev.
James E. Freeman, Bishop of
Washington.
s:3o—Twilight Voices.
6:oo—Echoes of the Orient.
6:ls—Countess Olgo Mendolago Al
bani. soprano.
6:30—01d Company Sonalogue.
7:oo—Heroes of the World: "Alexan
der the Great.
7:3o—Correct time.
7:3l—Musical program by Maj. Ed
ward Bowes' family, from the
Capitol Theater. New York.
B:3o —Chase & Sanborn Choral Or
chestra.
9:00—"Our Government,” by David
Lawrence.
OUT-OF-TOWN STATIONS.
Program* prepared bp the Atsociated Press. Scheduled for Pattern Standard time.
454.3—WEAF Near Yertt—666.
s:3o—Twilight Voice*—Also WKKI.
WJAR, WTAO, WCSH, WRC,
WOR, WCAS.
6:oo—Orient Echoes —Also WRC,
WGY, WCAE; Countess Albani
—WRC, WOY, WWJ, WCAE.
6 :30—Songalogu?—Also WEEI, WCSH
WTAG. WJAR, WRC, WOY
WOR WLIT
7:oo—Heroes of World—Also WJAR,
WTAO, WCBH. WRC. WOT,
WGR. WCAE, WPJC, WWJ.
W6AI. WRVA. WBT. WJAX,
WIOD. WHAS, W6M, WBB,
WFI.
7:3o—Maj. Bowes’ Family, Louise
Bave, soprano—Also WJAR.
WRC. WGY. WCAE. WWJ,
WBAI, WFJC, WIOD, WHAS,
WSB. WTAM.
6:3o—Choral Orchestra—Also WTIC,
WJAR, WTAO, WCSH, WRC.
WGY, WOR, WCAE, WFJC,
WWJ, WBAI, WIOD, WHAS
WSB, WBT.
6:00 —"Our Government,” by David
Lawrence —Also WJAR, WTAO.
WCSH. WRC, WOY, WCAE,
WHAS, WSAI. WFJC, WOR,
WSB. WBT. WWJ.
9:l5—A. K. hour, Christmas program—
Also WEEI, WRC, WFI, WOY,
WOR, WCAE, WTAM, WWJ,
WBAI, WON, .WBM, .WBB„
WBT, WHAS, WAPL
10:15 Champions’ Orchestra Also
WTIC, WTAO, WCBH, WFI,
WRC. WOY. WOR, WCAE,
WTAM. WWJ, WON. WJAR.
10:45—Beth Parker—Also WCAE,
WHAS. WJAX. WWJ, WFJC,
WIOD. WOY. WRC. *
11:15—Russian Choir —Also WWJ,
WOY; Sam Herman —Also
WWJ, WOY.
348.6—WA8C New York—666.
s:oo—News reel—Also WADC, WNAC,
WKBW WKRC, WHK, WOHP,
WLBW, WCAU, WJAS, WEAN,
WFBL, WSPD, WMAL, WHEC,
WWNC, WTAR, WDBJ, WBRC,
WOOD, WLAC.
5:30 —Sermon by Dr. Barnhouse—Also
WMAL, WKBW, WEAN, WNAC,
WKRC. WJAS, WFBL, WLBW,
WCAU. WCAO, WDAC, WHP.
6:oo—The Fur Trappers’ Orchestra—
Also WCAU. WNAC. WHK.
6:30 Joe Howard Also WJAS,
WNAC. WEAN, WHK, WSPD,
WCAU. WFBL. WKBW, WADC,
WKRC. WOHP, WLBW. WMAL,
WMAQ.
7:oo—Vocal and orchestra—WAßC
only; Ancestors—Only to WHP,
WFBL. WDBJ. WKBN, WDOD,
WLBW, WWNC, WJAS, WGHP,
WCAO
7:3o —French Trio Also WMAL,
WFBL, WDBJ, WKBN. WDOD,
WBRC, WLBW, WWNC, WJAS,
WGHP, WSPD.
7:4s—Dr. Klein—Also WMAL. WHP,
WFBL. WDBJ. WKBN, WDOD,
WKRC. WEAN, WBRC, WLBW,
WWNC, WJAS, WNAC, WMAQ.
B:oo—Rhapsodizers Also WNAC,
WCAU, WEAN. WFBL, WCAO.
WJAS, WADC. WKRC. WLBW.
WMAL, WMAK, WGHP, WSPD,
WHK.
8:30 —Wayne King’s Orchestra Also
WADC, WCAO, WNAC, WMAK,
WKRC, WHK, WGHP. WCAU,
WJAS. WEAN, WFBL, WSPD.
O/d Company's Lehiqh
Qnthracite means
Safe , economical heat
Tune in the
I OLD I
COMPANY'S I
SINGERS I
mvmry Sunday, 6.30 p.m.
WEAF a Aaaoc. Id. M. C. StmHmnm
OLD
COMPANYS
LEHIGH ANTHRACITE
gL.c. N.co.im
THE SUNDAY STAR, WASHINGTON, D. C„ DECEMBER 22. 1929—PART FOUR.
9:15 —Atwater Kent hour: "Hansel and
Gretel,” by quartet of noted
singers.
10:15—Studebaker Champions.
10:45—Sunday at Seth Parker’s.
11:15—Russian Cathedral Choir.
11:45—8am Herman, xylophonist.
11:59 to 12:00 —Weather forecast.
Early Program Tomorrow.
6:45a —Tower health exercises.
8:00a—On the 8:15.
B:lsa —Morning devotions.
B:3oa—Cheerio.
9:ooa—Morning Melodies.
10:00a—Hits and Bits.
10:30a—Studio program.
11:00a—Three Little Maids.
11:15a —Radio Household Institute.
11:30a—Songs by Pauline Haggard.
11:46a—Bridge talk by Mrs. John
Munce, Jr.
12:00m —Farm flashes.
12:10—Lotus Orchestra.
I:oo—National Farm and Home hour.
I:46—Organ recital and Grace Lee
Rials, soprano.
2:3o—The Melody Three.
3:ls—Studio program.
3:3o—American Foundation for the
Blind.
4:00 to s:oo—u. 8. Marine Band.
226.6—W0L—1,310,
(American Broadcasting Co.)
10:00a—Musical program.
10:30a—Paige Burroughs, contralto;
Florence Yocum, soprano, and
Gretchen Hood, soprano.
ll:ooa—Services of the First Congrega
tional Church.
12:15—Birthdays.
12:16 to 12:20—Public Service Man.
Early Program Tomorrow.
7:3oa—Reveille.
7:3sa—Musical clock.
6:ooa—Birthdays.
B:lsa—Breakfast brevities.
10:00a—Household chat by Peggv
Clarke.
10:15a—Music.
265.4—WJ5V—1,460.
(Independent Publishing Co.)
10:30 to 12:30—Evangelistic service;
sermon by Rev. William Mc-
Dougali.
7:oo—Ladies’ Choir of Fairfax, Va.
B:oo—Services of First Church of
Christ, Scientist.
9:OO—L. Z. Phillips, trombonist.
9:ls—Gretta Ludwig, contralto.
9:3o—Oospei Melody Trio.
9:4s—Chick Godfrey, tenor.
10:10 to 11:00—Clark and Gourley,
Gospel singers.
Early Program Tomorrow.
6:00 to 10:00a—Helpful hints to house
wives; music.
11:30a—National Farm program.
11:45a—Current events.
12:00m—Time signals.
3:00 to s:3o —Midafternoon musleale.
9:oo—Theater of the Air—Also WADC,
WCAO, WNAC, WMAK. WKRC,
WHK. WOHP, WLBW, WCAU.
WJAS, WEAN, WFBL, WSPD.
WMAL, CFRB, CKAC, WSAZ,
WDEL, WWNC. WTAR, WDBJ,
WBRC, WDOD, WLAC.
10:00—Poet of the Organ—Also WADC.
WCAO, WNAC, WKBW, WKRC,
WHK. WOHP, WLBW, WCAU.
WJAS. WEAN, WFBL, WSPD.
WMAL.
10:30—Arabesque—Also WMAL. WHP.
WFBL. WDBJ. WKBN. WDOD,
WKRC, WLAC. WEAN, WADC.
WLBW, WWNC, WJAS, WNAC.
WOHP. WHK, WCAO, WSPD.
WKBW.
11:00—Back Home hour—Also WMAL,
WHP, WDBJ, WKBJ, WKBN.
WDOD, WLBW, WGHP, WSPD,
WCCO, WKBW. WCAU.
18:00—Brokenshire’s Coral Islanders;
midnight organ melodies—
WABC.
394.5—WJZ New York—7«9.
o:3o—National religious service—Also
WBZ, WBAL, WHAM, WLW,
WAPL
6:3o—Anglo Persians Also WBZ.
KYW wTr AM’ KDKA ' WLW.
7:oo—TraveiogOe; descriptive mono
logue—WJZ only.
7:lo—At the piano—Also WBZ. WBAL,
wSis’wM*’ WLW ’ WSM
• :00—Melodies—AiM WBZ. WHAM,
WJR, WLW. WHAS. WSM.
WSB, KDKA.
B :ls —Uncle Henry’s Magazine—Also
KDKA - WJR.
WLW. KYW.
9:l6—Parislenne Romance Also
WBZ, WHAM. KDKA. WJR,
9:4B—The Brush Man—Also WBZ,
WHAM, KDKA, WJR, KYW.
10:15—The “Messiah’’—Also WHAM.
n
so j| §1 0 |* W sat **^ y you °f its
House &. Herrmann 1
“Furniture of Merit” Seventh at Eye
OPENS TINY THEATER.
WABC Heralds Innovation by New
Broadcasting Experiment.
WABC heralded an innovation in
broadcasting recently when the “Tiny
Tots Theater cf the/Air" —a modern
theater in miniature—was opened In
the main studio of the Columbia
Broadcasting System.
The “Tiny Tots Theater of the Air”
comprises a stage twenty feet in width
and amply large enough to accommo
date any radio cast; a pit In which the
orchestra sits, and chairs for audiences
up to and including 200 people. Spot
lights are used in the rear cf the studio
during broadcasting to give the effect
of a real theater. Microphones are
placed at strategic points along the
stage but do not interfere with the
audience's view of the production.
11:00—“My South.” Katherine Tift-
Jones— Also KDKA.
11:15—South Sea Islanders (30 min
utes): quartet <ls minutes) —
Also KDKA, WRC.
272.6 WPG Atlantic City—l,loo.
s:ls —Religious services.
7:oo—Special Sunday concert.
9:ls—Hotel concert orchestra.
10:00—News; The Vagabonds.
10:30—Galen Hall Trio.
11:00 —Organ concert.
282.8 WBAL Baltimore—l,o6o.
s:3o—Same as WJZ (14 hours).
7:oo—Reveries (30 minutes); WJZ (30
minutes).
282.8 WTIC Hartford—l,o6o.
B:3o—Same as WEAF (45 minutes).
9:ls—The Enchanted hour.
10:15—Same as WEAF (30 minutes);
news.
422.3—W0R Newark—7lo.
5:00 —Dr. Payne; Sunday Salon.
6:oo—Cathedral Saga.
7:oo—Hotel concert orchestra.
B:oo—Choir Invisible.
9:oo—Halsey Street Playhouse.
10:00 —Moonbeams with string trio.
256.3—WCAU Philadelphia— l,l7o.
s:3o— Same as WABC (14 hours).
7:OO—H. and F.; Pioneers.
8:00—WABC programs (24 hours).
10:30—Feature: Style Masters.
11:16—WABC program (45 minutes).
305.9 KDKA Pittsburgh—9 80.
6:oo —Shadyside Presbyterian.
6:3o—Same as WJZ (30 minutes).
7:oo—Calvary Episcopal Church.
B:OO—WJZ programs (2*4 hours).
10:15—Pipes O' Pan.
11:00—WJZ (1 hour).
260.7 WHAM Rochester—l.lso.
s:3o—Same as WJZ (14 hours).
7:oo—Fireside Forum.
7.3O—WJZ programs (3®4 hours).
379.5—WGY Srhrnectady—79o.
6:3o—Same as WEAF (6 ft hours).
302.8 WBZ Springfield—99o.
s:3o—Same as WJZ (14 hours).
7:oo—Around the Campfire.
7:3O—WJZ programs (2ft hours).
10:16—WBZ Players; news.
CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN
STATIONS.
428.3—WLW Cincinnati—7oo.
s:3o—Same as WJZ (14 hours).
7:oo—Hotel Orchestra.
7:3O—WJZ programs (I*4 hours).
9:ls—Trio (15 minutes); symphony
hour.
10:30—Great Adventurers.
11:00—Musical Novelesque (1 hour).
396.8 WCX-WJR Detroit—7so.
6:oo—Xmas stories <3O minutes) ;WJX.
7:oo—Com Poppers; ensemble.
7:3o—Same as WJZ (2ft hours).
10:15—The Little Church.
10:45—Quartet; Troubadours.
11:30—Organ requests.
12:00—Dance music hour.
405.2—W58 Atlanta—746.
7:OO—WEAF and WJZ (3ft hours).
10:15 —Bright Spot hour.
277.9 WBT Charlotte—l.oßo.
6:3o—Twilight program.
7:oo—Same as WEAF (30 minutes).
7:3o—First Baptist Church.
B:3o—Same as WEAF (Ift hours).
10:15—Organ recital.
395.9 WHAS Louisville—B2o.
7:OO— WEAF and WJZ Oft hours).
10:15—Feature (30 minutes); WEAF
(30 minutes).
11:15 —Reporters; orchestra (45 min
utes).
461.3—WSM Nashville—9so.
7:OO—WEAF and WJZ (lft hours).
B:ls—Vine Street Church.
9:ls—Hour from WEAF.
10:15—WSM Rhythm Symphony.
270.1—WRVA Richmond—l,ll9.
7:OO—WEAF (30 minutes); organ (30
minutes).
8:00—St. Mark's service.
CHAMPION SINGERS RECEIVE AWARDS
"■ 1 ■
Mj Pk.
..«<■ '■L -W JSS%, *T%
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y'v _ / 'kjpjtegjpMk'
■'••»• v.. ;r* 35*
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Atwater Kent, on left, presenting checks to Genevieve Irene Rowe of Wooster,
Ohio, and Edward Austen Kane of Atlanta. Ga., winners of the 1929 national
radio audition. The contest finals were held last Sunday night and were broad
cast over WRC and an extensive N. B. C. network.
"Graham
(wllk**' ttfi McNamee
VHfer jf? Speaking—”
AS THIS year, with its record of
tremendous achievement in
breadcasting, draws to a close
I cannot help comparing It with
the old days—almost no time
ago. when you stop to think about it—
when broadcasting was a game that we
were all playing. There was as much
fun to it as work. When we put on a
good orchestra and a couple of singers
and could get through an evening with
out an announcer doubling for an ab
sent artist we thought we were grand.
But I doubt if any of us foresaw the
elaborate programs, some of them em
ploying as many as 125 people, that are
to be heard today. When we broadcast
a program through two stations we were
just plain thrilled. Now we arrange to
have our programs rebroadcast in Eu
rope with so little furore that half of
our staff never hears of it. When De
vora Nadworney deserted the Chicago
Civic Opera for radio it was a sensa
tion. This year Sir Harry Lauder. John
McCormack and a lot of opera stars
all went on In the same week, and It
was nothing more than everybody ex
pected.
Eight years ago it was a lark for a
few singers and entertainers to climb to
the tiny room over a Newark factory
to broadcast for the benefit of a few
score radio nuts. Nobody thought It
would last. Today the studios are as
large as good sized halls and everybody
wants to double them, both in size and
number. By the way, there are more
alumni of that little Newark studio
than there are Mayflower descendants.
Every seasoned mike star seems to have
made his or her debut over there. They
sang for nothing then, but those who
stuck to it and made good are earning
big salaries today. The Revelers are
the highest-priced male quartet in the
world today. A1 Bernard says all those
years of practice taught him how to be
funny in a different way week after
week. And that crazy “tomato-can
mike” they had then was so delicate
that Vaughn d* Leath learned how to
croon by trying to keep from blowing
the station oft the air.
Can't Kid Microphone.
“What is your favorite broadcast of
the year?" a friend of mine asked me
the other day. That's easy; It’s the last
one I did. Whenever I report an event
before the microphone I am sincerely
convinced when It Is over that It was
the most interesting thing I ever cov
ered. It Is my business to be en
thusiastic about it, but it can’t be any
sham enthusiasm. If it were, the lis
teners would spot it in a minute. There
Is only one thing in the world that
can’t be kidded at some time, and that's
a microphone. It catches up all your
mannerisms, your tricks of speech and
all those shadings of the voice that tell
an observant listener when you don’t
quite mean what you say, and magnifies
them a dozen times.
The announcer’s success, If any. be
gins when he Is thoroughly interested
in the job he is going to do. Then it
always helps to learn as much as you
can before you get on the ground. When
you get there you must be in a recep
tive frame of mind. I always expect to
like my jobs, and I can’t remember that
I have ever been badly disappointed. I
remember one time, though, when I had
my doubts. I was asked to announce
a basket ball game in the northern part
of New York State. Now, when I was
younger basket ball was a girl's game,
and, anyway, I spent most of my Win
ters playing hockey. I knew very lit
tle about it. However, they wouldn’t
let me off, so I accepted, with the pro
viso that they supply me with two ob
servers who knew the game and the
teams.
Meanwhile I read everything on
basket ball I could find, but when I
started off I was doubtful and expected
to do an awful flop. I half hoped the
cold air would give me something nice
and final, like pneumonia. But when I
got to the sidelines the atmosphere be
gan to get me and as soon as the game
began I forgot everything else. I’d
always been happy with a microphone
in front of me and a yelling crowd of
sports fans around me and the atmos
phere did the trick. I've been back
there several times since.
Public Speakers Show No Fear.
It has always seemed to me that pub
lic men get on remarkably well with
microphones, but I can't say that the
reverse is always true. I have never
yet seen an experienced public speaker
turn green at the sight of a mike, al
though more than one stage and con
cert star has suffered “mike fright.”
Alfred E. Smith and Charles O. Dawes
show no fear whatever of a microphone
Perhaps it would be better if they did.
Both are forceful public speakers, but
the engineers always got lame wrists
from twisting the dials to keep the vol
ume right. Smith seems to pretend the
microphone isn’t there and then goes
ahead as if he were talking in a hall.
Gen. Dawes barks at it as if it were
an offending private.
I have never believed that it made the
slightest difference to President Cool
idge or President Hoover whether a
microphone were there or not. Charles
E. Hughes never seemed to be dis
turbed by one while speaking before an
audience, but the first time he spoke
from the studios there were only three
other persons present. No criminal be
fore the bar of justice ever got a look
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as severe as Judge Hughes gave that
microphone.
Whalen Always Urbane.
Mayor James J. Walker of .New York
City would have made a good an
nouncer in the days when everything we
said was extemporaneous. I believe he
likes microphones. He can go before
one utterly unprepared and talk as long
as you wish him to without a quiver.
His friend and police commissioner,
Grover Whalen, is always urbane, but j
he prefers to read a prepared speech.
Comdr. Byrd approaches the micro
phone as If it all came in the line of
duty. He acts and speaks with the sim
ple dignity that has characterized i
everything he has done. I have always
regretted that wc never had Theodore
Roosevelt on the air. Radio came too
late for him, but I'll bet he’d have ;
learned how to use it in short order.
Every now and then we broadcasters j
make mistakes and when we do we
usually hear about them. Some of our
worst mistakes, including the treacher
ous slips of the tongue, never are caught.
Profanity is barred on the air, but the
mike made a curse out of a perfectly
good sentence of mine once and no
body caught it. It was at a foot ball
game several years ago. and I guess I
can tell it now without getting called
on the carpet. Phil Carlin disagrees
me now as to which game it was,
but, anyway, the home team, ahead in
the final quarter by one point, was be
ing splattered all over the held in the
last drive of the visitors.
“Dam that flood if you want to win
this foot ball game," I started to say,
but just then the left half of the home
team intercepted a pass and I never
did finish that sentence. I didn't real
ize what I had said until I looked over
at Phil and saw him shaking with laugh
ter. When Monday came around I
hardly dared go to the studios, but I
have never heard a word about that
simple "damn" that got into the mike
to this day. The crowd noise must have
covered it, or I should have had hun
dreds of letters berating me.
Wary of Figures of Speech.
But I've been wary of figures of
speech ever since. An engineer I know
wasn't so fortunate. He was giving a
“test talk” over the wires before an
early-morning commercial program was
to go on the air. After burlesquing
some of the company’s advertising he
went on, “You all know our Mr. ,”
naming a prominent executive. “He’s
the reason for the nice new entrance to
our building. We had to widen it to
let him in.” The transmitter was on
the air warming up and it hadn't been
cut off from the line carrying the pro
gram from the studio. Every word went
out cn the air. To make it worse, the
wife of the official happened, by one
of those when-it-rains-it-pours coinci
dences, to be listening in. Today “test
talk" consists entirely of counting and
the enumeration of technical details.
McNAMEE'S QUESTIOxN
BOX
BY GRAHAM McNAMEE.
Q. What is Percy Hemus doing on
the air nowadays?—E. Miller, New York
City.
A. Percy Hemus has been off the air
for the past few months, but he is
scheduled to reappear in December or
January with a new’ series of programs.
At present it is called “The Jameses"
and is concerned with the doings of an
ordinary American family. Hemus is
not only author of the sketches, but
will play a dual role, appearing as the
father and the grandfather.
Q. What is Walter Damrosch's ad
dress. and would he answer fan mail
if any one wrote him?—R. C. C., Dor
chester, Mass.
A. Walter Damrosch lives at 146 East
Sixty-first street. New York City. Al
though he receives a huge amount of
mail in connection wdth his programs,
I am told that he answers all of it.
Broadcasters are always glad to receive
letters of appreciation, because, as you
know, their mail helps them to decide
how well or how badly they are doing
their work.
Q. Is it true that Rudy Vallee has
been married and divorced? Are you
in a real supper club during tan
Fleischmann hour?—Jean White, North
Adams, Mass.
A. Rudy has been married but not
divorced. The marriage was annulled.
No, we are not in a real supper club.
Rudy and his orchestra broadcast from
a special studio constructed in the
theater at which he may be playing
that w’eek, while the rest of us are at
the main studios.
Q. What effect has a broadcast of a
big sports event on you when there is
a great favorite of yours involved?—
Mickey Haggerty. New’ Haven, Conn.
A. In the first place, I try not to
have any favorites, but when I surper:
myself of a leaning one way I try to "
give the other fellow a little the better . -
of the breaks. Although I try to be so.
I imagine it is humanly impossible to
be absolutely impartial. However, when
I read over my mail after any big
sports broadcast I usually find that
complaints of partiality are pretty ‘
evenly divided between the adherents
of both sides. Actual partiality, of
course, would ruin the usefulness of a
radio reporter. His job is to give a
fair and interesting picture of what *
takes place, and if he fails to do either
he is lost. In my own case lam proud
to say I have the friendship of prac
tically all the fighters whose bouts I -
have announced and of the coaches and "
managers of the foot ball teams to ■
whose games I have taken a micro- '
phone.
Q. Can you tell me anything about
Charles W. Hamp?—Mrs. Eva Ingman,
Warren, Ohio.
A. He appeared as an entertainer on '
several radio stations, signed a vaude
ville contract, and filled several impor
tant engagements in New York last
season. He is now on tour, but he will
probably reappear on network programs
before the Winter is out. Although his
work is well known, he has dodged in- '
terviewers. and little is known about
him personally. Watch the newspapers
for announcements of his return to the
air.
Q. Who is the woman who takes * •
part in “Famous Loves of History”? "
Give me a short history of Jessica
Dragonette.—R. s. Wherry, Richmond, ‘'
Va.
A. Rosaline Greene, born in Hemp
slead. Long Island. After being grad
uated from the New York Teachers’
College, at Albany, she joined the WGY ' ’
Players in Schenectady in 1923. Her *
work there gave her a reputation even ’ '
in New York, and something more than
a year ago she made her debut as a *"
regular network actress. In 1923 she
was selected at the Radio World’s Pair “’■
in Madison Square Garden as the ■ '*
woman with the most perfect radio
voice. She is best known for her work
in Eveready and Radio Guild pro
grams. Jessica Dragonette was bom ’
in Calcutta, and was educated in Geor
gian Court Convent, in Lakewood. N. J " '
She sang the only solo part in the New ”
York production of “The Miracle," and
later was featured in "The Student -
Prince" and “The Grand Street Follies."
She is unmarried.
(Copyright, 1929.)
Cities' Noises Discussed.
Elimination of excessive noises in the
cities is being discussed in an afternoon . .
series of talks on WEAF. The next, '
talk will be December 31, followed by ' '
others on January 7, 14, 21 and 38.
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11

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