OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 10, 1930, Image 35

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1930-01-10/ed-1/seq-35/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for C—3

Bowling Winners of Three Cities Meet
WASHINGTON, BALTIMORE,
BOSTON STARS MATCHED
Evening Star, Baltimore Sun and Boston Herald
Champions, Survivors of Field Totaling
3,500, Will Shoot It Out February 1.
BY R. D. THOMAS.
TONY DE FINO and Bess Ackman, who won the championships
of The Washington Star’s singles tournament, have another
big scrap to go through.
They will battle the champions of two other large city
tournaments.
George L. Isemann. secretary of the National Duck Pm Bowling
Congress, today completed arrangements for a meeting of the win
ners of The Washington Star, Baltimore Sun and Boston Herald
tournaments. , . „ , _ ...
Thev will shoot five games in Washington and five in Baltimore,
total pins to determine the winners. The Saturday following the
Howard Campbell sweepstakes, February 1, is the date. An afternoon
k set will be rolled in Baltimore, and at night they shoot at Conven
tion Hall. , , . t .. . ,
The Baltimore Sun event is not ended, but the present leaders
likely will stay on top—Charles A. Heim, in the men’s class, with
665. and Lotta Janowitz, in the women’s, with 547.
Manuel Silveira won the Boston
Herald event, with a total of 662,
and Janett Killgren led the girls,
with 354.
Washington’s champions were
well below the figures of the
others, De Fino’s 632 and Mrs.
Ackman’s 344 being unusually
small scores to win from so large
a field.
The six to take part in th? intercity
contest will have vanquished a total of
3,500 bowlers.
Star's Prizes Awarded.
Prizes won in The Star's ef*ent are
now available at Convention Hall, there
being no formal presentation. Mast of
them were turned over to the skilled
and fortunate last night by Earle Stock
ing, chairman of the tournament com
mittee.
Heim is a surprise leader in Balti
more. He is a policeman and physically
a mighty man.
Says Ed Sparrow, Baltimore Sun
scribe:
"Heim was cut out to smash the
maples, both large and small. He
stands 6 feet 1% inches, weighs 200
pounds and is ail muscle and bone.
What probably makes him an extraordi
nary bowler at duckpins is that he owns
a hand span of nearly 10 Vi inches. Few
bowlers can boast such a span.
"The fact that Heim always has been
a base ball pitcher undoubtedly has been
of assistance to him in bowling. He
won four games and lost one for Lieut.
James C. Downs’ police team last year.
Until he hurt his arm late in the season
he pitched an overhand ball that had
a hop to it. After the injury he used
an underhand delivery, a delivery that
' is required on the alleys.
Has Never Won Medal.
"Expert judges of bowling form de
clare that Heim’s ci;oss-fire alley ball
is just about the best in Baltimore. His
consistent rolling proves that assertion
; Heim has been rolling both duck and
ten pins for about 10 years, never hak
'won an individual meaal, but has per
formed on several teams that have won
championships.
"His official score in the Evening Sun
, tourney is 665, and was made on game
scores ot 152. 142, 135, 132 and 104.
His unofficial high total is 677 for
1 five games, made on the Arcade alleys,
and nis best one game is 177. These
,scores were made without a foul judge.
"Speaking ot his poor score in tne
last, game, Heinrsaid:
"’i went into that last game with
more confidence than in any of the
preceding four games. I had fine con
trol, hit the bails perfectly, but I had
, 6 splits in the 10 frames. That ruined
me.'
258 Best Tenpin Score.
"Heim’s best work at tenpins is a
to.al of 258 for one game and 645 for
three. These games also were rolled
at the Arcade. When Heim was em
ployed by the American Ice Co. he was
i on its championship intercity team, and
he also was a members of the champiou
fhip Armstrong Cork team.
• During part of the 1924 season
Helm was a member of the Hagers
;town (Blue Ridge League) club. Later
■he pitched for the Yellow Cab Co. nine,
and March 8, 1929, he joined the Balti
more Police Department.”
It is assured that at least 36 will go
to post tomorrow night at the Coliseum
In the first set of the Howard Camp
bell sweepstakes. This many would
make a purse of S9OO to be split four
•ways besides a diamond-studded medal
lor the champion. Arville Ebersble,
secretary of the Washington City Duck-,
pin Association, who has charge of the
tournament, ha-, communicated with
every’ prospect and has rounded up
jinany sweepstakes neophytes.
Charles G. Morgan looks like the
.winner of the tournament at Harry
’Heils Boulevard alley, in Bethesda.
Fourteen patrons of this place posted
! two bucks each wlth the one rolling
' high score for three games this week
jto drag down the S2B as an entry fee
for the stakes. Morgan has a set of
423 and only tonight and tomorrow aft
itmoon remains for somebody to beat it.
Ebersole is busy on another sweep
stakes, too. He will direct the Masonic
Bowling Associations tournament, to be
held at Convention Hall February 8 and
15, with entries closing February 1.
.This will be the first handicap ’stakes
•ver held here.
Master Masons of Washington,
Hyattsville, Silver Spring and Claren
• don will be eligible. Each entrant will
b? taxed $3, the prize morty to be split
45 per cent to the winner, 25 per cent
to the runnerup, 15 per cent to third
place winner, 10 per cent to fourth and
£ per cent to fifth. Two sets of five
games each will be shot.
The handicaps will be two-thirds of
the difference between the bowlers' av
erages and 115, which is scratch. En
tries should be turned in at Convention
• Hall.
Washington Gas Light Co. and Pub
lic Utilities Commission will finish a
30-game series tonight at Mount Rainier,
at 8 o’clock. The Gasmen picked up a
large lead in the opening set rolled at
the Arcadia.
Bernle Frye took first honors in the
first elimination round of the five-back
tournament at the King Pin No. 2, with
a sec of 979. Competition will be re
sumed tonight. The first round scores
follow:
CHAMPIONSHIP PLIGHT.
»r>e 184 ISO 235 174-979
IJ Poulo* 125 212 220 211 179 -947
•-'Hundley 200 163 160 130 223—940
Pucci 167 156 235 150 188 -696
Alsoo 186 165 166 219 135—881
£ Poulos 228 169 140 171 162—870
CONSOLATION PLIGHT.
iColvin 140 146 137 182 #8—703
Grove ............... 107 153 101 142 181-664
fitickel . .. 126 120 180 112 116—604
I Smith 144 188 163 100 68—583
8 Sffl•« 18=58
MANDELL IS WILLING
TO BATTLE QUINTERO
i MIAMI BEACH. Fla., January 10
f/Pi. —Lightweight champion Sammy
Mandell today said he was ready to re
pulse the left handed thrusts of Young
l Manuel Quintero. Cuban boxer. In the
first major ring engagement of the Flor
ida season.
Mandell meets Quintero tonight in a
10-round non-title bout at the Miami
feeach Kennel Club.
The champion is favored, although
Quintero will be one of the few left
banders Mandell has encountered.
SPORTS.
i
FINE FIELD STARTS
: LOS ANGELES GOLF
129 Play for SIO,OOO Prize
Money in 72-Hole Event
on West Coast.
By the Associated Press.
LOS ANGELES, January 10. —The
rain-soaked course of the Riviera
Country Club today failed to
dampen the ardor of 129 tried
and proven golfers as they prepared
to start their three-day Journey through
72 holes of medal play in the fifth an
nual Los Angeles SIO,OOO open tourna
ment.
The select field of the country’s lead
ing performers of the fairways face the
prospect of starting their campaign for
the championship now in the possession
of MacDonald Smith, Long Island, N.
Y.. professional, in a downpour of rain.
This, coupled with the stubborn 71-par
course, with its nigged terrain and
changeable ocean winds, presents a for
midable obstacle to .the contenders.
The somber clouds are not without
their silver linings to others of the
links stylists. Among these are Walter
Hagen, whose record in foreign tourna
ments under adverse weather condi
tions has marked him as a strong
favorite, should the rain continue.
Joe Kirkwood, the Australian trick
shot artist, and Olin Dutra, Santa
Monica professional, who finished in a
tie for the first-place money at Long
Beach, are conceded an advantage be
cause of ability displayed as "mudders.”
Certain victory Is in prospect for Mr.
Par, for under ideal climatic conditions
in last year’s tournament, Smith was
able to finish with no better than even
perfect figures, when he turned in a
284 for the classic.
Smith will tee off today with two of
hLs prominent opponents—the leading
money winner of the Nation, Horton
Smith of Joplin, Mo., and Henry Cuici,
a rising young professional from Bridge
port, Conn.
Some Leading Threesomes.
Some of today's leading threesomes
are:
MacDonald Smith. Horton Smith. Henry
C i>o Diesel. Atua Callente: Bobby Cruick
shank. New York: A1 Espinosa. Chicago.
Walter Hasen. Detroit. John Golden. Pat
erson. N. J.: Fred Morrison. Los Ameles.
Craig Wood. Bloom Held. N J.: A1 Watrous. !
Detroit: Tommy Armour. Detroit.
Johnny Farrell. St. Augustine. Fla.: Joe
Tumesa. New York: Olin Dutra, Santa Mo
nica. Calif. , ,
Ed Dudley. Wilmington. Del.; Willard
Hutchison. Chicago: Abe Espinosa. Chicago.
Leonard Schulte. Lima. Ohio: Billy
Burke. New York: Tony Manero. New York.
W. H. Cox. Brooklyn: Joe Kirkwood. Phil
adelphia: Harry Cooper. Buffalo.
George von Elm. Detroit; Denny Bhute,
Columbus. Ohio: Willie Hunter. Los Angeles.
Tom Kerrigan. New York; Neal Mclntyre.
Indianspolis; Ray Mangrum. Los Angeles.
laytoiTandreiselt
PLAY FOR CUE TITLE
By the Associated Press.
NEW YORK. January 10.—Johnny
Layton of St. Louis and Otto Reiselt of
Philadelphia will meet tonight for the
national three-cushion billiard cham
pionship. now in Layton’s possession.
The defeat last night of Augle Kieck
hefer. Chicago southpaw, by Tiff Den
ton, Kansas City veteran, automatically
eliminated Kieckhefer and left Layton
and Reiselt free to fight It out in the
final.
Denton, who lost his first three starts
in the tournament, conquered Kieck
hefer, 50 to 26. In 38 Innings for his
fourth successive triumph. Earlier In
the dav Denton had beaten Gus Co
pulos of Detroit, 50 to 41, in 41 innings.
Copulos also lost to Allan Hall, youth
ful St. Louis star, 50 to 31, In 53 in
nings. In the other match of the day.
Charles Jordan of Los Angeles recorded
his first triumph of the tournament
when he defeated Harry Schuler of
New York, 50 to 38. in 65 Innings.
Only two matches remained to be
played today—the Reiselt-Layton cham-
I pionship game and an encounter be
; tween Kieckhefer and Hall, with sec
,! ond-place honors at stake.
Denton, Copulos, Jordan and Schuler
have completed their schedule of seven
games. The other four each have play
ed six matches.
The standing:
Player. W. L. Player. W. L.
Reiselt 5 1 Denton 4 3
Layton S 1 Copulos 3 4
’ Kieckhefer 4 2 Jordan 1 6
i Hall 4 2 Schuler 0 7
i
With the Bowlers
Merchants’ League.
s Barber & Rass won two games for
j Thompson Brothers’ Furniture. Houck,
i with a 136 game and 351 set, was high
t : for the winners.
J j E. W. Minte won two from Skinless
s Fianks. while Penn Electric Co., with
' the aid of Harvey’s 335 effort, took all
three from the Stern Co.
Southern Dairies picked up a game
J on the leaders with a clean sweep of
* their set with Hugh Reilly. Jacobs
3 shot 343 for the winners.
“ Thompson’s Dairy took three from
Sunshine Yeast, Curtis of the milkmen
shooting a 326 set.
W. R. Winslow took two from Na
tional Biscuit Co. Snee shot a 341 set
} for the winners.
Tcaai Standing*.
) W. L. W. L.
,• Barber A Roaf. 34 8 Hugh Reilly 30 22
South. Datrlea. 31 11 Nat. Biscuit Co. 16 26
Skinless Franka 26 16 Sunshine Yeast 15 27
5 Penn Elect. Co. 26 16 Thomp. Bros. F 14 28
; Thompson's D’y 24 18 E. W. Minte.. 14 28
W. R. Winslow. 22 20 Stern Co 10 32
Record*.
I High team game—Barber A Ross. 5*2.
i High team set —Southern Dairies, 1.679.
High individual game—Russell (B. A R ),
156.
1 High Individual set—F. Velhmeyer <Skln
. less Franks'. 365.
1 High average—Jacobs (Southern Dairies),
109-11. >■
THE EVENING STAR, WASHINGTON, D. C„ FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1930. •
Norse Men and Women. —By Feg Murray
•ewto's' champion / J%S / ' i
. riGuPe 6KATSR. / m fg j/Fy
fomtciK Ot-VATPiO
HEAVYWEIGHT -HOLPeJ?
chmmhkpn in. i
dMrottftML (Imm Inks
SIX years ago this Summer a
young Norwegian heavyweight
named Von Porat brought the
Olympic title back to the
Land of the Midnight Sun and not
long afterward, as is the way of
amateur champions, turned profes
sional and came to America.
Now he is a member of that not
too-exclusive set, the T. F. H. (Top
Flight Heavyweights), and if he
j gets by Uzcudun tonight should be
in line for some big battles this
Spring and Summer. Otto lost no
prestige in his fight with Phil Scott,
which he lost on a foul last De
cember: Instead It was "Fainting
Philip" who lost the prestige, if any.
Otto von Porat showed great im
i provement in 1929. He used to
be a right-hand slugger only, but
gradually improved his boxing and
now can sock with either mitt and
hold his own with almost any man
in the world. No one would ever
Concentration Most Valuable
Asset in Golf , Says Turnesa
BY JOE TURNESA,
Winner of 1.000 Guineas Yorkshire Tourna
ment. 15.000 Lannin Memorial and other
tamous tournaments. Runner-up In 1925
national open and 1938 professional cham
pionship.
(This Is the fifht of a series of articles
written hy famous amateur and profes
sional golfers, telling how they overcame
outstanding faults in their play.)
I’M not going to talk about the cor
recting of any one type of shot.
Every player has difficulty with
some phase of golf, I suppose. It
may be his drive or his irons, his short
pitches or his putting. I’ve had my
share of trouble and smoothed it out,
but I want to discuss one subject—the
most important, it
seem to me, hi all
golf.
That is concen
i tratlon!
f I went through
the usual long
apprenticeship the
1 successful profes
sional has to face.
After I had my
bag of tricks and
had mastered all
shots from driving
to putting I still
wasn't much of a
[figure in tourna
ment play. Some
thing always hap
pened. A bad shot,
or two or three,
,Q
L^£j
Joe Turnesa.
I
cropped up where they would do the
most damage.
What was the trouble? It didn't seem
to me I had a particular weakness. I
couldn’t put my finger on anything
definite.
After a careful study I found that I
lacked concentration. I was worrying
too much about what the other fellow
was doing, and in consequence wasn’t
paying enough attention to my own
job. Instead of concentrating on the
shot immediately before me I was
planning how to make, the next one.
So, with my mind a couple of hundred
Master Putting
During Winter
BY SOL METZGER.
As the clip shot is merely a long
putt played with a lofted club in
order to jump your ball over the
longer grass of a fairway, It stands
to reason that a mastery of putting
principles gives one control over two
radically different lies during a
round.
So, master putting. You can do it
this Wintertime at odd times at
home with one of the many devices
that can be set up on a carpet or
i rug. Practice of this nature now
! will greatly improve your play next
i season. Putting Itself is an art that
JOHhTtOM
FOLLOW
"THROUGH
s demands rather lengthy explanation.
So, if you want to understand Its
1 principles, write me, care of this
> paper, for my putting leaflet, and
Inclose stamped, self-addressed en
• velope. I’ll send It along.
[ The main idea in these shots is
the low follow through, according to
Bobby Jones. This means your club
i; head closely hugs the ground as it
, follows after the ball. That is the
1 dominant Idea, too, when Harrison
5 Johnston, United States amateur
2 champ, putts, as the sketch shows.
Sol Metzger has prepared a com
plete analysis of the pivot with 11-
; lustrations, w-hich will aid any
golfer. He will gladly send It to
any reader requesting it. Inclose
, a stamped, address'd -nvel'pe.
{Copyright,
claim that the big Norseman had
the fastest - working gray matter
among the heavies, but he will learn
with more experience, and he has
a smart manager in Ed Stevenson,
wealthy Chicago plumbing contrac
tor. They should get along finely
unless the plumber’s influence gets
to w’ork and Stevenson shows up at
the arena some night without his
fighter, having forgotten little Otto
and having to go back for him. Von
Porat's knockout of K. O. Christner
last Summer is probably his chief
fistic achievement to date.
The two other Norse athletes in
cluded In the accompanying car
toon are also well known and are
certainly more graceful than the
big Chicago heavyweight. Seven
teen-year-old Sonja Henie created
a sensation in her New York debut,
and so did Charley Hoff when he
came over here as world pole vault
champion and all - around star.
Let’s hope Sonja doesn’t get In a
row with the A. A. U. as Charley
Hoff did. Otto is out of their juris
diction anyway.
yards away, something was bound to go
wrong.
This wasn’t a fault peculiar to me.
I have heard others express themselves
along similar lines. Keep your mind on
the job immediately in hand. Oolf de
mands the utmost In concentration.
You can't be thinking about something
else and bring off a good shot without
extraordinary luck. And that sort of
luck won't keep up indefinitely.
Just saying you’re going to concen
trate doesn’t solve the problem. It is
as much of a job as mastering mathe
matics. You have to keep working at
■ it. I’d go out on the course deter
mined to keep my mind on each shot
as I played it. Before I knew it, I
found myself thinking of other things—
what kind of a pitch would I have to
, play on the next shot: would I get that
1 putt down if I didn’t? Bit by bit I
mastered myself, but it was a real
struggle.
So it seems to me that the one thing
i above all others the golfer should mas
: ter is concentration. Don’t think about
' getting pars or a good score. Good
■ scores are built up by individual shots,
. and each shot to be worked out is a
- problem in Itself. Don’t bother about
1 what your opponent is doing. Your
1 thoughts are not going to help or hinder
- him. They will help or hinder you,
i though.
, Learn to concentrate. You have to
. do it in your business to be successful,
and you can’t be a good golfer wlth
. out it.
Next—Al duel.
(Copyright, 19S0. by North American News
pape- Alliance.)
POWER EXCEEDED
BY CAPITAL STATIONS
■ Power of broadcasting stations in the
' District of Columbia is in excess of that
alloted to the Federal Capital under the
Davis amendment to the radio law,
under which radio is operated, accord
ing to a revised summary of broad
casters by power, time and frequencies,
sent to the Senate today by the Federal
Radio Commission. The summary
supersedes a similar compilation sent
to the Senate December 10.
Washington has three broadcasting
stations, WRC, WMAL and WOL, all
operating day and night, with total
power at night of #SO watts. WRC and
WMAL are on regional channels with
total night power of 750 watts, while
WOL is on a local channel with power
of 100 watts. The power ratios were
said to be as of the date of November
27, 1929. Power used in the District of
Columbia is eight-hundredths of 1 per
cent of that allotted to the entire na
tional broadcasting network.
The Davis amendment specifies that
the District of Columbia is allotted four
tenths of 1 per cent in power rating,
whereas the summary shows power used
to be .56 per cent. The December 10
report showed power used in the District
of Columbia to be .51.
The first radio zone, in which Wash
ington is located, was using, on Novem
ber 27. last, only 18.46 per cent of its
rated 20 per cent of power.
wrestling" IS PLACED
UNDER GOVERNING BODY
CINCINNATI, Ohio, January 10 (/P). —
Wrestling, a profession which never rec
ognized any national affiliation and fre
quently witnessed many muddled cham
pionship situations, was placed today by
the National Boxing Association on the
same organized basis as all governed
sports.
Stanley M. Isaacs, president of the
National Boxing Association, which last
year included the mat game in its juris
diction, announced that effective imme
diately all wrestlers are subject to the
benefits, championship awards, suspen
sions and discipline of the national or
ganization. About 3,500 wrestlers are
affected.
High spots of the National Boxing As
sociation wrestling requirements call for
defense of championships three times a
year, posting of title appearance forfeits
ranging from $2,500 to $5,000, public
bidding by promoters for the privilege of
staging championship bouts, wrestlers
to accept terms of the highest bidder,
national champions to be decided in
recognized classes by April 20, 1930, and
championship entries to be matched by
public drawing.
*;* - *.'V • ,
SPEECH REPLACES
WRC MELODRAMA
Senator Wheeler to Tell What
Progressives Are
Fighting For.
“Mystery House,” the popular melo- ;
dramatic radio serial, gives way on the |
program of WRC tonight to Senator j
Wheeler of Montana, who will speak on >
“What the Progressive Democrats and j
Republicans Are Fighting for in Con- |
gress.”
WRC drops the sketch at one of the
most thrilling episodes. Washington j
listeners who have been following the
series can pick it up. however, through i
stations WEAF, WTAG, WWJ, WOC,
WGR, WCAE and WDAF.
Two of WRC's major musical sea- ,
turcs will be provided by the Cities ;
Service Orchestra and Cavaliers and J
Planters’ Pickers, which consist of Billy
Artz's Orchestra and the Songsters, a
Negro quartet. Rosario Bourdon has
arranged a varied program for the
Cities Service hour, while the Pickers
will present a group of Southern melo
dies. The specialty will be an orches
tral version of "Away Down South in
Heaven.”
Selections by Arthur Pryor’s Band also
will be woven into the Schradertown
broadcast between the dialogue of Gus
and Louie, the garage partners. The
band will play two of Pryor s composi
tions, "The Victor March” and “In
Lover's Lane,” in addition to Mussi’s
“Echoes of the Metropolitan Opera
House,” the "Grasshopper Dance” of
Bucalossi, and Laigini’s "Voice of the
Chimes.”
“Volcano Island,” a Tale.
“Volcano Island,” a dramatic tale of
an old sea captain, will be narrated in
the Harbor Lights period, scheduled by
WRC from 9 to 0:30 o’clock. The story
deals with a fabulous treasure hunt,
with a picturesque and tragic back
ground.
The Brownbilt Footlites, which has
been combing the concert and theatri
cal world for new talent, introduces to
night over WMAL and associated Co
lumbia Broadcasting System stations
two prominent artists —Louise Richard
son, formerly prlma donna of the Amer
ican Opera Co., and Joe Santly, a sing
ing comedian. Miss Richardson will
contribute several bayou songs, while
Santly, who wrote "Hawaiian Butter
fly,” “Tamlami Trail" and several other
popular numbers, will sing a group of
his outstanding successes.
The Curtis Institute of Music pro
gram, which returns to WMAL’s pro
gram after an absence of several weeks,
will feature William Cameron, harpist;
Benjamlno Grobani, baritone; George
Pepper, violinist, and Theodore Saiden
berg. pianist. The program is made up
of classical numbers exclusively.
True Story Hour.
The True Story hour dramatization,
to be broadcast by WMAL at flu o’clock,
will be based on the story “Stronger
Than Love.” It is a romantic tale, its
scenes shifting from the blossom
scented mountains of Japan to the
Latin Quarter of Paris.
WMAL will close its program with an
hour of dance music by Sleepy Hall and
his orchestra, now playing at Wardman
Park Hotel.
The District of Columbia Chapter of
the Izaak Walton League of America
will present a special program over
WOL at 6:45 o’clock. It will consist
chiefly of humorous dialogue between
"Rufus and Rastus,” Negro characters.
The Alexandria Hawaiians and James
Chamberlain, tenor, are featured to
night by WJSV, which has arranged a
diversified program, starting at 6:30
o'clock and continuing to 11 o'clock.
WALKER CUP TEAM
SELECTIONS TODAY
Jones Is Slated to Captain
Golf Squad Again—G. U.
Star May Be Picked.
BY BRIAN BELL,
Associated Press Sports Writer.
NEW YORK, January 10.—After
the meeting of the executive
committee of the United States
Golf Association this afternoon
the big Spring Invasion of British golf
shores will not seem so far away.
The men who say where, when and
how national golf competitions in the
United States are to be decided plan
ned to name a captain for the Walker
Cup team, and the players who will sail
for England In April to compete against
Britain's best amateurs will be selected
soon after the leader.
Bobby Jones, open champion and
captain of the 1928 Walker Cup team,
is slated to succeed himself. Jimmy
Johnston is the amateur champion, but
the St. Paul star has always declared
that where Bobby Jones sits is the head
of the golf table. He was among the
first executive committeemen to insist
that the Atlanta lawyer serve another
term. , , .
Five ol the eight players who repulsed
the last British challenge for the Walk
er Cup probably will be asked to play
again—Jones, Johnston, George von
Elm. Francis Ouimet and Jess Sweetser.
George Voight appeared certain to get
a place for the first time and Dr. O.
F. Willing, the Oregonian who was
runner-up in the amateur champion
ship, has earned a nomination after
an absence since 1924.
McCarthy May Go.
If Don Moe, another great Portland
golfer, can get away from his studies
he may be named. Maurice McCarthy,
another collegian, possibly will have to
be passed by on the same ground. Eu
gene Homans, who tied with Jones for
the medal at Pebble Beach, was an
other candidate, but H. Chandler Egan,
amateur champion 25 years ago and a
semi-finalist in the last championship,
probably will stand aside for some of
the dozen youngsters who can readily
qualify for a place as principal or
alternate on the international team.
Ouimet and Sweetser have played on
all five of the teams representing the'
United States in Walker Cup competi
tion. Jones has been a member of
four, Johnston three and Willing and
Von Elm two. McCarthy and Homans
were alternates In 1928, but did not
play.
While the executive committee was in
session at one hotel, the greens section
talked of turf problems In another.
Tomorrow the annual meeting of the
U. S. G. A. will be held, with most of
the present officers, Including Presi
dent Findlay s. Douglas, being re
elected for another term.
PAT RAEDY IN CORNER
OF MANDELL’S ENEMY
TAMPA, Fla., January 10.—Pat Raedy
of Washington, D. C., welterweight bat
tler of the 90s, will be chief second in
Manuel Quintero’s corner at the Miami
Beach Kennel Club tonight when Quin
tero meets Sammy Mandell, world light
weight champion, In a 10-round, non
title bout.
Raedy will be In complete charge
during the bout.
«o*u »«''•*** - * v --rs*.
Today on the Radio
PROGRAM FOR FRIDAY, JANUARY 10, 1930.
(Meters on left of call letters, kilocycles on right. All lime p.m unless
otherwise indicated.)
LOCAL STATIONS.
315.6—WRC—958.
(National Broadcasting Co.)
2 45—Band of a thousand melodies.
3:ls— Rochester Philharmonic Or
chestra.
4:ls—Pacific feature hour.
! s:oo—Studio feature.
! s:ls—“Wise Giving,” by Homer Folks,
j s:3o—“The Lady Next Door.”
I 5:55 —Summary of programs,
i *6:oo—Black and Gold Orchestra,
i 6:4s—"The World in Music,” by Pierre
! V. Key.
! 7:00 —“Amos ’n’ Andy.”
i 7:15 May Singhi Breen and Peter de
Rose.
I 7:29 —Correct time,
i 7:30 —Raybestos Twins.
| B:oo—Cities Service hour.
! 9:00 —Harbor Lights.
! 9:3o—Schradertown Band.
! 10:00 —Planters’ Pickers,
i 10:30—"What the Progressive Demo
crats and Republicans arc Fight
ing for in Congress.” by Senator
Wheeler of Montana.
11:00 —Weather forecast.
11:01 to 12:00—Lotus Orchestra.
Early Program Tomorrow.
6:4sa—Tower health exercises.
8:00a —The Aunt Jemima Man.
B:lsa—Morning devotions.
8:30a —Cheerio.
9:00a —Morning Melodies.
1 10:00a —Hits and Bits.
11:00a—Three Little Maids.
11:15a—Radio Household Institute.
11:30a —Studio program.
12:00—Organ recital from Kitt Studios.
I:oo—National Farm and Home hour.
I:4s—Luncheon of the League for
Industrial Democracy.
3:00 —The Marionettes.
4:oo—Studio program.
4:30 to s:oo—Whyte’s Orchestra.
228.9—W0L—1,318.
(American Broadcasting Co.)
3:00 —William Samayoa, pianist.
3:3o—"Browsing Among Books,” by
Harriette Spaulding.
4:oo—lmpersonations, by Helen Webb
Zeller.
4:ls—Katherine Dunning, pianist.
4:30 —Philip Notes’ Troopers.
s:oo—Mullane’s Merrymakers.
s:3o—Racing results.
5:45 —The Town Crier.
6:oo—Public Service Man.
6:o3—Pauline Loria, “blues” singer.
6:ls—Musical program.
6:3o—Talks by Miss Jack Martin.
6:4s—“Let’s Go Fishin’.”
7:oo—Dinner music.
7:20 to 7:3o—News flashes.
Early Program Tomorrow.
7:3oa—Re veUle.
7:35a —The musical clock.
B:ooa—Birthdays—A thought for the
day.
B:lsa—Breakfast brevities.
B:2sa—Music.
9:3oa—"The Family Market Basket.”
10:00a —Talk under auspices of Amer
ican Red Cross.
10:15a—Something for everybody.
11:30a—Half hour with great com
posers.
12:00—Luncheon music.
3:oo—Mary D. Junkin, soprano.
4:oo—Kathrine Dunning, pianist.
OUT-OF-TOWN STATIONS.
Programs prepared by the Associated Press. Scheduled for Eastern standard time.
454.3—WEAF New York— #6s.
6:oo—Black and Gold Room Dinner
Orchestra—Also WCAE, WRC.
6:4s—World in music by Pierre Key—
Also WWJ, WTAG.
7:oo—The Jameses, comic sketch—
Also WWJ.
7:30—T0 be announced—WEAF.
8:00—-Rosarie Bourdon Concert Or
chestra and Cavaliers—Also
WEEI, WTIC, WLIT, WRC,
WGR, WTAM. WJAR. WCSH,
WWJ, WSAI, WTAG, CKGW.
9:oo—Harbor Lights—Also WEEI,
WTIC, WJAR, WRC, WGR,
WWJ, WSAI.
9:3o—Gus and Louie with the Town
Band—Also WEEI, WTIC,
WJAR, WTAG, WCSH, WGY,
WGR, WCAE. WWJ, WBAI,
WRC, WLIT, WFJC.
10:00—The Songsters, Negro Quartet —
Also WTIC, WJAR, WTAG,
WCSH, WLIT, WRC, WGY,
WGR, WCAE, WFJC, WWJ,
WSAI, CKGW.
10:30—Mystery House, sketch—Also
WTAG, WRC, WWJ, WGR,
WCAE.
11:00 —Vincent Lopez* Dance Orches
tra hour—Also WWJ, WFJC,
WGY, CKGW.
348.6—WA8C New Yerk— Bßß.
6:3o—Orchestra and vocal—WAßC;
Specht’s orchestra Only to
WBRC, WWNC, WLBW, WJAS,
WHP, WKBN, WDBJ, WCAO,
WFBL, WKRC.
7:00 —Entertainers—WAßC; hotel or
chestra—Only to WCAO, WHP,
WLBW, WDBJ, WFBL, WBRC,
WWNC, WJAS.
7:3o—Fashion Plates Orchestra —Also
WCAU, WEAN, WFBL, WJAS.
B:oo—Footlights—Also WADC. WCAO,
WNAC, WMAK, WKRC, WHK,
WGHP, WLBW, WCAU, WJAS,
WEAN, WFBL, WMAL, WHEC,
WWNC, WTAR, WDBJ, WBRC,
WDOD, WLAC, WCAH.
B:3o—Penmen—Also WFBL, WHK,
WMAK. WJAS, WKRC. WNAC.
WEAN, WADC. WLBW, WCAU,
WCAO, WGHP, WSPD, WMAL.
9:oo—Story hour—Also WADC, WCAO,
WNAC, WMAK, WMAQ, WKRC,
WHK. WGHP, WLBW, WCAU,
WJAS. WEAN, WFBL, WSPD,
WMAL, WHEC. WWNC, WTAR,
WDBJ. WBRC, WDOD. WLAC.
10:00—Court of Appeals—Also WCAU,
WNAC, WEAN, WFBL, WMAK,
WCAO, WJAS, WADC. WKRC,
WGHP, WMAQ, WSPD, WHK,
WLBW WMAL.
10:30—Institute of Music—Also WMAL,
WDBJ. WKBN. WKRC, WLAC,
WEAN, WADC. WBRC, WLBW,
WWNC, WNAC, WHK, WSPD,
WCAU, WGHP.
11:00—Weede-Myers Orchestra Only
WCAU, WBRC. WWNC, WDBJ,
WFBL, WLBW, WJAS. WEAN.
WNAC, WCAO, WGHP, WKBN,
WMAL. WSPD.
11:30—Ben Pollack's Orchestra—Also
WBRC, WWNC, WKRC, WKBN,
WFBL, WKBW, WCAO, WDBJ.
WGHP, WMAL, WSPD, WLBW,
WEAN.
894.5 — WJZ New York—7Bß.
6:oo—Smith Ballew’s Orchestra; books;
Pauline Haggard—WJZ.
7:oo—Amos ’n’ Andy—Also WBZ,
WHAM, KDKA, WJAR, WRC,
CKGW.
7:ls—May Singhl Breen and Peter
de Rose—WJZ.
7:3o—Circus—Also WBZ. KDKA,
KYW, WHAS, WSM, WSB,
WBT, WLW.
B:oo—The Choristers, male octet and
orchestra—WJZ.
B:Bo—Personalities at 711 —WJZ; Fa
mous Loves. “Marie Welewski”
—Also WBZ, WHAM, KDKA,
WLW, WRVA, WBT, WJAX.
WIOD.
9:00—Billy Jones and Ernie Hare —Also
WBZ, WHAM. KDKA, KYW.
WHAS, WSM, WSB. WBT.
> WJAX, WRVA, WAPI, WIOD,
WLW, WJR, CKGW.
9:3o—Orchestra and mixed chorus,
Johnny Marvin Also WBZ,
WHAM, KDKA, WJR, KYW,
WRVA, WSB, WBM, WBT,
WHAS. WJAX, WIOD.
10:00 —Quakers —Also WBZ, KDKA,
WHAM, WJR, WHAS, WSM.
WSB WBT.
10:30—To be’ announced—WJZ and Sta
tions.
11:00—Hour of Slumber Music—Also
WHAM, KDKA.
475.9—WMAL—620.
(Washington Radio Forum.)
3:oo—Columbia Ensemble.
3:3o—Today in history.
3:32—Fashion talk, by Margaret Oel
richs.
3:4s—“Psychologyby Elizabeth Fel
lows.
4:oo—United States Navy Band.
s:oo—"Browsing Among Books," by
Mary Weston Seaman.
s:ls—Piano syncopations.
s:3o—“Radio Topics,” discussed by
James E. Chinn.
s:4s—Ambassador tea dance.
6:oo—Correct time.
6:ol—Flashes from The Evening Star.
6:15 —Yeomans and McClure, novelty,
entertainers.
6:3O—A. A. A. radiologue, by George
E. Keneipp.
6:45 —Alice B. Harvey, pianist.
7:15 —Jimmy and Jane.
7:30 —A1 Dinsmore, tenor.
7:45 —Saks’ Fur* Entertainers.
B:oo—Correct time.
8:01 —Brown-Bilt Footlights.
8:30 —Wahl Penman.
9:00 —True Story hour.
10:00 —Brunswick program.
10:30 —Program by Curtis Institute of
Music. *
11:00 to 12:00—Sleepy Hall and his
orchestra.
Early Program Tomorrow.
9:30a —Morning on Broadway.
10:00a—Saturday Syncopators.
10:30a —Columbia Male Trio.
11:00a—United States Army Band.
12:00—Children’s drama.
12:30—Yoeng’s Orchestra.
1:30 —Barclay’s Orchestra.
2:oo—Eddie Worth and his Country
Fair Orchestra. .
2:3o—Patterns in print.
3:oo—Columbia Ensemble.
3:3o—For your information.
4:00 to 4:30 —The Aztecs.
434.5—NAA—69*.
(Washington Navy Yard.)
3:4s—Weather Bureau reports.
9:ss—Arlington time signals.
10:00—Weather Bureau reports.
*95.4—WJ5V—1.469.
(Independent Publishing Co.)
3:00 to s:3o—Midafternoon musicale.
6:3o—Dinner music.
7:30—Bill Thompson, old-time fiddler.
6:oo—Kerlin Sunshine program.
B:ls—James Chamberlain, tenor.
B:3o—Alexandria Hawaiians.
9:00 —Impersonations by Howard R.
Green. •
9:ls—The Mystery Girl.
9:3o—The Gondoliers.
9:so—Song stories.
10:05 to 11:00—The Washington Trio.
Early Program Tomorrow.
8:00 to 10:00a —Hints to housewives.
11:30 to I:oo—Farm news, music and
current events.
< 3:00 to s:3o—Midafternoon musicale.
272.6—WPG Atlantic City—l,l66.
s:3o—Organ recital; news (30 min.).
8:00—Hotel dinner music.
B:3o—Health talk; song shop.
9:ls—Dance; Oriole Glee Club.
10:15—Tenor; organ recital.
11:30—Dance music (30 m.).
282.8 WTIC Hartford 1,666.
7:oo—East Steppers; sports; news.
7:3O—WEAF programs (3 hrs.).
10:30—Orchestra hour.
11:30—News; organist (30 m.).
422.3—W0K Newark—7l6.
6:lo—Baritone; sports; Uncle Don.
7:oo—Hour of orchestras.
B:oo—Angela and Jazzette; orchestra.
9:oo—League of Nations dinner.
9:4s—Vlgnet.
10:60—Tuneful Tales; Minute Men.
11:00—News; dance; moonbeams.
256.3—WCAU Philadelphia—l,l76.
6:00 —Feature; news; Ismak.
6:4s —Financiers; presentation.
7:3O—WABC programs (4 hrs.).
11:30—Hotel Orchestra (30 m.).
365.9 KDKA Pittsburgh—6B6.
6:oo—Trio; Harmonlzers.
7:OO—WJZ (15 minutes); Travelers.
7:3O—WJZ (30 m.); concert.
B:3o—Buster (15 m.); WJZ (3% hrs.).
266.7—WHAM Rochester—l,ls6.
6:3o—Royal Purple Players.
7:OO—WJZ (15 minutes); studio pro
gram.
7:3o—Minstrel show.
B:oo—Recital; two pianos.
B:4S—WJZ programs (3*4 hours).
379.5—WGT Schenectady—794.
6:oo—Dinner music; musical.
7:oo—Speaker; pianist.
7:3o—Minstrel show.
B:oo—Concert orchestra.
9:oo—Ghost story, WGY Players.
9:3o—Hour from WEAF.
10:30—Did You Know?
11:00—Hour from WEAF.
1 torl Haiti* I
Electric Console
™ EY ig.jH QUANTITY
LAST LIMITED/
ORDER I | QUICKLY I
s fi Q SO $lO
\j %J Down
COMPLETE
NOTHING MORE TO BUY
OKAY RADIO CO.
jj 41511th St. N.W. 1760 Pa. Ave. N.W.
I' - v
LggBBgHBM —— , - || |i| jjm ||| |
Major “Chain” Features
TONIGHT.
7:30 —Dixi" 6ircu~.: r irrur, s‘o If«
»ni h-ni—Wi",
WBZ. TVTZV KDK*.
KYW, *7HA" V
W.'F \V ;T, WIIO .- n 1
WT AY.
3:C3—Cllirs Service hour; ir-.le
quartet and Bourdon Or
chesirr.—’WRC and N. B.
C. network.
B:oo—Brov.nbilt Foodi es; Louise
Richardson, former prima
donna of American Opera
Company, and Jo” Santly.
singing comedian
WMAL and C. B. S. net
. work.
B:4s—Famous loves, “Marie
Welcwska”; dramatic
sketch with musical back
ground—WJZ. WHAM.
KDKA, WBZ. WJR. WLW.
WRVA and others.
9:oo—Tnterwoven Pair; Ernie
Hare. Billy Jones and
orchestra WJZ, WBZ,
WBZA. WHAM. KDKA.
WMC. WHAS, WSM, WSB
p.nd others.
10:00 —Planters’ Pickers; Negro
quartet and Billy Artz’s
Orchestra—WßC and N.
B. C. network.
10:30—Talk by Senator Wheeler
of Montana—WßC and N.
B. C. network.
11:00—Sleepy Hall and his or
chestra : dance music—
WMAL and C. B. S. net
work.
302.8—W8Z Springfield—999.
6:oo—Markets: musical interlude.
6:3o—Singing the blues; piano.
7:OO—WJZ (15 minutes); banjoist.
7:3o—Same as WJZ <3O minutes).
B:oo—Feature: Corn Poppers.
B:4s—Same as WJZ (1% hrs.).
10:30—To be announced; news.
. CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN
STATIONS.
428.3—WLW Cincinnati—799.
6:oo—Hour of orchestras.
7:oo—Orchestra; scrap book.
7:3O—WJZ <3O min.); footlights.
B:3o—Ask Me <3O m.); WJZ <45 m).
9:3o—Band (30 minutes); WJZ (1
hour).
11:00 —Jack Little; Trio.
11:30—Burnt Corkers; dance.
12:30a—Sweet and Low Down.
1:00a—All night party (3 hours).
398.8—WJR~~Detroit—759.
6:oo—Dinner music; pie time.
7:OO—WJZ (15 minutes); orchestras.
8:00 —Feature; orchestra; grocers.
9:OO—WJZ feature (2 hrs.).
11:00—News; dance music.
12:00—Easy Chair; dance (1 hour).
495.2—WSB~Atianta—740.
7:oo—Rudy Brown’s Orchestra.
7:3O—WJZ (30 minutes); finance.
B:3o—Concert program.
9:OO—WJZ and feature (2 hours).
11:00—Peanut Pickers.
11:45—Hawaiian Ensemble.
12:15—The Chotae Family.
365.6—WHAS Lewisville—B29.
7:3O—WJZ (30 m.); orchestra.
B:3o—Voice of the Bank.
9:OO—WJZ feature (2 hrs.).
11:00—Reporters; Hawaiian.
11:30—Homing program.
12:00—Dance music hour.
461.3—WSM Nashville—669.
7:oo—Vocal and orchestra.
7:3O—WJZ (30 minutes); vocal and
orchestra.
B:3o—Francis Craig’s Orchestra.
9:OO—WJZ and studio (2 hours).
11:00—The Shield Men.
279.1—WRVA Richmond—l,llß.
6:oo—William Byrd Trio; sports.
7:oo—Movie news; Frank and Ernest.
B:oo—String ensemble.
B:4S—WJZ programs (1% hours). *
10:00—Quartet (30 m.); feature.
11:00—Hotel orchestra hour.
gwumMimmimimmwmmmimiw
Trade In
Your Battery Set
or Old Electric Set
On a NEW /
Atwater Kent j
Majestic 4/
Brunswick or f
Zenith
All Sold on EASY TERMS
A Liberal Allowance for
Your Old Sot
Phone NORTH 0790
Ask for Our Representative te
Call and Give Yew Estimate
MONARCH
RADIO SHOP
IMI L St. N.W.
“iiiniitnintimiiimiirnmimiHiiiml
C—3

xml | txt