OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, June 14, 1930, Image 3

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1930-06-14/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-3

HOOVER IS FACING
KNOTTY PROBLEMS
. Swarm of “Touchy Issues”
Confront Him at Middle of
Presidential Term.
BY BYRON TRICE.
I Associated Press Staff Writer.
Just at the political half-way mark
of his four-year term, President Hoover (
finds his fortunes ringed about these
f* June days w ith a numerous and per- j
.ai‘.*istent swarm of touchy public issues. 1
As if by prearrangement, the whole
brood—-tariff, farm relief, prohibition, ]
foreign relations, internal party troubles j
—has come buzzing about the head of !
the man who. by virtue of being Presi- 1
dent, is also the leader of the Repub- j
lican party.
Two years ago tonight, amid the gay j
bunting and triumphant band music at
Kansas City, he was elevated to that
leadership by a single, one-sided roll
* call.
a Two years hence —unless history
'* breaks her well-established habit—sn
* *' other national convention will see his
' followers rallying to consummate his
denomination.
1932 Campaign Discussed.
Already the straws are bending to the
passing breeze and Washington is full
of talk of 1932. What Mr. Hoover him
self may be thinking—and what first -
term President ever has failed to think
of that subject—no one is undertaking
to say. His friends, however, are getting
ready, and so are his enemies within
the party.
Those who look to another term for
him rely heavily on the appeal they
Claim for him among the rank and file
of voters. They declare this hold is
stronger, rather than weaker, by virtue
of such defeats as he has suffered in
Congress and such open breaks as he
has arrived at with party politicians.
They see in the great number of major
projects he has planted in the national
fabric a promise of bountiful fruition in
the two years to come.
Third Party Gossip Persists.
Those within the party who have at
tacked him—for instance, Senator
Borah, Senator Norris and the whole
senatorial fraternity of discontent with
his policies—are not talking for publi
cation on the subject of 1932. They
are talking among themselves, however,
and the third party gossip, which has
been a part of every Republican pre
convention campaign for a generation,
persists. It persists, but no one is will
ing to sign his name to a prediction.
Two years is a moderately long time
* In presidential politics. Many a pollu
tes’. wind will blow before June, 1932,
s- and no man knows what sails w’ill be
* filled or what high ventures will break
on the rocks. Yet both friend and foe
of the President’s fortunes understand
fthat a great deal of real import may be
found later to have had its source in
this very cave of the winds which en
velops Mr. Hoover in the month of June.
1930.
Almost immediately he must decide,
for better or for worse, whether to sign
or veto a tariff bill, which has divided
opinion in his party and kept political
weathervanes whirling.
Farm Relief Arouses Contention.
The whole Hoover farm relief pro
gra m. with its multitude cf intra-party
complications, has become suddenly ex
posed to another Senate debate—than
which there is none deadlier—through
t renomination of the head of the farm
board.
If it can be said with no derogation
of the presidential dignity, his coattails
are being pulled this way and that by
advisers who think they know’ what he
should do and what he should refrain
from doing about unemployment and
the situation in the stock market.
A group of Senators, led by Repub
licans who show an increasing willing
ness to talk back to the White House,
has steered the Hoover naval treaty into
the doldrums and heroic relief measures
may be required.
Quarrel Rages Over Prohibition.
As the off-year elections approach,
the President finds not only Republicans,
but Hoover Republicans, quarreling all
•bout him over prohibition.
Finally, his own Republican national
- ‘ A organization is debating whether to drop
its pilot, under attack, and select a new
* national party chairman, and if so,
whom, and also7 how.
4 All of which are but a few of the
things that silver the hair and furrow
the faces of Presidents, and often spell
re-election or defeat. And opinions dif
fer whether the first two years are the
hardest.
PLANE TO BE MEMORIAL
SANTA MARIA, Calif.. June 14
The Southern Cross, noted transpacific
plane, now poised in Ireland for a trans
atlantic flight, upon completion of that
trip is to become a memorial to avi
ation at the Hancock Foundation Col
» lege of Aeronautics.
The college announced today that
Capt. Kingsford-Smith, w’ho is in Ire
land awaiting favorable weather, plans
* to give it the ship.
SPECIAL NOTICE
CHAIRS FOR RENT—SUITABLE FOR BAN
ouets. rereptlons. parties or meetings. From
10c to 20c per day each New chairs
UNITED STATES STORAGE CO.. 418 10th
at. nw. Metropolitan 1843
THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE 'BTOCK
holders of the American Fire Insurance
Company of D. C. and the election of nine
<9i trustee' of ihe company for the ensu
ing year will be held at the office of the
company. 511 7th st. n.w., Thursday. June
39 1930. at 11 o'clock am. Poll* open from
II a m. *o t p m
GEORGE M. EMMERICH.
- Secretary.
105 V DISCOUNT ON SUPREME AUTO SEAT
cover*, all next week. Pl.one Lin. 5276-J. •
‘ IjWCb "NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY
’ dews other than those contracted by myself.
GEORGE W. SCHAEFFER. 45 M st. n.w. •
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY
0 <iebt' contacted by any other *han mys'-lf.
' e/CRvrLLF L. HEMP. Blue Plains. D C. 16*
S " MACHINERY FOR “SALE—
• Electric stitcher and finishing machine, com-
motor, ready to use. Also Landis
bufflrlial finisher: cost *1.200: sell for Jl5O
cast* rVCITED STATES STORAGE CO., 420
10th sT._n.w.
HOI BE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY
vFfW LtlNg than those contracted by mv-
BLASIF.. 218 12th pi. nr. 15*
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR DEBTS
contracted by any other than myself. PAUL
B PANHQLZER. 1328 4'? fit. *w.
Vs!9n WANTED—RETURN LOADS
From NEW YORK CITY JUNE 18
Fnim NEW YORK CITY JUNE 20
Tft>m ROCHESTER. N. Y JUNE 27
From SYRACUSE JUNE 28
From BUFFALO JUNE 30
Prom NEW YORK CITY JULY 2
To NEW YORK CITY JUNE 23
TO JACKSONVILLE. FLA JUNE 22-25
.■UNITS© STATES STORAGE CO. INC.
41g jo; (i St,. N.W. Metropolitan 1845
jTH* Sengstack, Tinner,
Ferniet4v fn business at 737 11th st. a e.. Is
Now Located at is 7th Si. N.E. Ph. ATI. 3334.
u-tu *** —
• SAVE YOUR FURNACE!
■° HAVE IT
CLEANED and PAINTED
$3.50
KILLIAN E* KENDRICK
1341 Harvard St N.W. Phone Col. 8572.
P-.piia4ing Craftsmen . . .
MH *sft. . . ,
v are at your service lor
result-getting publicity
The National Capital Press
1210-1212 D St. N.W Phone National 0850
WHEN ROOFS LEAK
—don t crawl around with pots and
pans trying to catch the drip. Send
y for ur-. We ll stop the leaks prompt
♦ ly. It's our nusiness We know bow!
VFVYMC Roofing 119 3rd St SW.
Company District 0933.
Wanted—Load
—from New York. Philadelphia. Richmond.
Va.; Chicago, 111 ; Pittsburgh. Pa., and At
lanta City
To Pittsburgh, N. Y., Cumberland. Md..
and Harrisburg. Pa.
% Smith’s Transfer & Storage Co.,
1818 You St. North 1848.
A GRIM MONUMENT OF DEATH
- |L
This great column of smoke was seen rising from the sea 24 hours after the
wreck of the tanker Pinthis, with a gasoline cargo and the loss of 47 lives. A
roaring and hissing was heard by the photographer, who, on board a small fish
ing sloop, braved injury or possible death to get this photo. The tanker is at
the bottom of the ocean, 18 fathoms deep, 8 miles off Scituate, Mass.
—Wide World Photo.
FLAG ANNIVERSARY
WILL BE OBSERVED
Capital Is Leading Nation in
153 d Brrthday Programs
Today.
Flag bedecked, the National Capital
is leading the Nation today in the ob
servance of the 153 d anniversary of the
birth of the American Flag, to be fea
tured by a huge Flag-day demonstra
tion on the east steps of the Capitol
tonight at 8 o’clock.
Some 54 organizations also will join
a flag ritualistic service under the aus
pice., of Washington Lodge. No. 15. B
P. O. Elks, in the Central High School j
auditorium tomorrow afternoon at 3
o’clock.
The ceremony at the Capitol tonight
will be under the auspices of the Grand
Army of the Republic and the Woman's
Relief Corps. One of its features will
be the presentation of a pageant depict
ing the "Birth of the Flag.”
Crosby and Holaday to Speak.
Another important part of the pro
gram at the Capitol will be a march
down the steps of the Defenders of Old
Glory, the service men, who saw ac
tion in the Civil and Spanish-American
Wars respectively. Addresses will be
delivered by Gen. Herbert B. Crosby,
District Commissioner and Representa
tive William P. Holaday, Republican
of Illinois.
Flag day exercises were held today
at the Bureau of Engraving and Print
ing. under the auspices of the Bureau
of Engraving and Printing Post of the
American Legion.
The occasion was observed at Busi
ness High School yesterday.
The general public is invited to at
tend the exercises under the auspices of
the Washington Lodge of Elks in Cen
tral High School tomorrow afternoon.
Among the organizations to be repre
sented at the services will be the Grand
Army of the Republic, the Confederate
War Veterans, Spanish War Veterans,
American Legion, Veterans of Foreign
Wars, Loyal Legion, American War
Mothers’ Club, American Red Cross,
Daughters of 1812, Boy Scouts, Girl
Scouts, the Mystic Shrine, Kallipolis
Grotto. Masonic lodges. Knights of Co
lumbus. .Daughters of the American
Revolution. Reserve Officers’ Associa
tion. the Eagles, Moose and Gold Star
Mothers.
The exercises at the school will in
clude vocal and instrumental music,
brief devotional services, the reading of
the history of the flag by John Dillon
F.tzgerald, past exalted ruler of Elks:
the Elks’ ritual ceremony, and a short
patriotic address by Past Exalted Ruler
of Elks Edwin S. Puller.
Three parades will be held as a pre
liminary to the exercises in the school
and will combine at the school for the
ceremony.
The first parade will start at Six
teenth and Columbia road, headed by
the Veterans of Foreign Wars, led by
the 116-piece band and drum corps, un
der command of Capt. Harvey L. Mil
ler; the second will start from Eleventh !
and Columbia road, with the posts of :
the American Legion headed by the
Costello Post Drum and Bugle Corps, j
and the third will start from Fourteenth
and Park road with the members of the
lodge, headed by their 55-piece boys’ 1
band, under command of Lieut. George
Chapman. Special members of the ;
drill team of the lodge will act as mar- t
shals, under command of Maj. C. Eu- I
gene Edwards. The Boy Scouts, in
charge of Col E. L. Mattice, will assist !
in the lines of march.
Choral Club on Program.
The Lovette Choral Club, under the j
personal direction of Mrs. Eta White
ford Lovette, will render vocal music, j
Mrs. Lorena M. Gawler. will give sev- i
eral vocal selections. She will be ac
companied by Julien Edwards at the 1
piano.
Invocation will be given by Rev.
Luther S. Frank, pastor of the Em
manual Episcopal Church of Anacostia,
D. C., and the benediction by Rev.
Eugene T. Kennedy. S. J.
The 1.565 Elk Lodges throughout the
Nation, with a membership of 875.000
will hold similar services to thosp to be
held under the auspices of the Wash
ington Lodge tomorrow.
STUDENT OUTING HELD
Business High School Group Has
Chesapeake Beach. Program.
The annual outing of the Business
High School students, faculty members
and alumni is being held today at Sea
side Park, Chesapeake Beach, with an
all-day program.
The committee in charge is headed bv
Robert B. Riley, jr„ chairman, and
Margaret McCloskey, vice chairman, and
includes also Paul J. Sedgwich, Israel
Silverman and Catherine Passin.
LIBRARY TO CLOSE
Building to Shut Doors Saturday
Afternoons Through Summer.
The Library of Congress will be closed
at 1 o’clock Saturday afternoons, begin
ning today and through the Summer up
to September 27, it was announced to
day by Allen R. Boyd, executive assist
-1 ant.
1 This is in line with the President’s
order giving half holiday Saturdays
[ during the Summer.
Parent-Teacher Election.
CLINTON, Md„ June 14 (Special).—
Henry Witt has been elected president
of the Parent-Teacher Association of
, Surrattsville High School, with W E.
■ Penn, vice president; T. S. Penn, sec
, retary, and Allen Penn, treMurer. Much
good work has been done my the asso
. elation during the schoor year now
closing.
THE EVENING STAR, WASHINGTON, D. C., SATURDAY, JUNE 14. 1930,
ID BRICK CAPITOL;
GAVE 0. S. IIS FLAG
Place Where Congress Met to
Make Over National Em
blem to Be Razed.
BY' FRANK W. HUTCHINS.
Os course it was in Philadelphia that
our national flag was first designed and
created. All honor to the Quaker City
and (for the story is too pretty to
doubt) the nimble fingers of Betsy Ros?.
But Washingtonians should not forget
that later the little Capital on the
Potomac had to do the job all over.
It was this way. That first legally
established flag of 1777 consisted of 13
stripes, alternately red and white, and
13 white stars in a canton of blue. A
beautifully appropriate emblem while
the number of States remained 13. But
soon other States were added to the
Union. Now what to do? Congress
enacted that a new star and a new
stripe should be added to the flag upon
the admission of each new State.
That proved impracticable. It soon
led to more stripes than the flag could
effectively carry. And. no telling how
many more yet to crowd on. The nat
ural result was that the law was little
observed. Flags of varying numbers
of stripes were floating everywhere—
even over Government buildings. The
national banner had come to be almost
anything that was red, white and blue.
Nation's Flag Reshaped.
Such was the situation when Uncle
Sam moved from Philadelphia to his new
seat of Government on the Potomac.
It was there, in little Washington City,
that he faced the difficulty and re
shaped the flag.
That was in 1818. The act of Con
gress declared that thereafter the num
ber of stripes should be the original
13, but the number of stars always to
equal the number of States. That is
the flag law under which we live today.
But all that does not half tell the
story for this particular Flag day in
Washington. This one has peculiar
significance.
On the corner of First and A streets
northeast stands a great gray building
of out-of-date dignity in the midst
of tree-grown gardens. We all know
it as the "Old Brick Capitol.” Its
genuineness as the one time home of
Congress, though at times questioned,
has recently been thoroughly estab
lished. Greatly changed in the pass
ing of a century, it still rightly wears
its honors and its bronze tablet. But
it stands today condemned, empty,
awaiting destruction to make room for
the new Supreme Court Building. This
is the last Flag day that will see any
vestige of the old structure left. What
of all that?
Well, it was in this "Old Brick Cap
itol” that Congress was sitting when
it made over our national flag.
Banner Is Unfurled.
Tired of flying all sorts of banners —
13 stripe'. 15 stripes, 19 stripes—this
little Capitol on the corner ended the
confusion. A flag was at once made in
accordance with the new law. It was
! the work of a Revolutionary soldier’s
daughter. So, all unheralded and un
, sung, a new Betsy Ross! The flag was
i at once unfurled from the peak of the
j roof over Congress
At last a national embiem symbolizing
; simply and beautifully our origin and
I our growth. Those changeless few
stripes, the little commonwealths that
, won our independence; thvwe ever T
; mounting stars, the growing galaxy of
i States united to preserve it.
j And, peculiarly significant today, that
this perfected flag of our country was
designed, declared and first flung to the
, world by that doomed "Old Brick
; Capitol.”
STOCK TRANSFER ORDER
IS REQUESTED IN SUIT
Sharon Executors and Trustees of
Lady Hesketh's Estate Seek
$181,400 Certificate.
Suit to compel the Chevy Chase Land
Co. to transfer stock in the company
belonging to the estate of Dame Flor
ence Emily Fermor-Hesketh (Lady Hes
keth) of London, who died September
25, 1924, to the estate of her deceased
cousin, William Evan Sharon of San
Francisco, who died February 25, 1926,
and who had been named fesiduary leg
atee under the will of Lady Hesketh,
was filed yesterday In the District Su
preme Court by the Sharon executors
and trustees, his widow, Mrs. Lillian
Sharon, and his sons, Robert A. and
Burford C. Sharon. The original face
value of the stock certificate was
$181,400.
The Sharon executors and trustees
made demand on the executors of the
' estate of Lady Hesketh for the sur
| render of the American property of the
I wealthy English woman, and the trans
fer has been agreed on, it is stated, but
the land company has declined to issue
a stock certificate to the Sharon trus
tees until certain tax matters can be
arranged or unless ordered by the court.
Attorneys McKenney. Flannery & Cralg
hill appear for the Sharon estate.
i
WILL OPEN CAMPAIGN
. Senator Ball Starts Speaking; Pro
gram Tonight at Leesburg.
By a Staff Correspondent of The Star
ARLINGTON COUNTY COURT
HOUSE, Va., June 14.—State Senator
Frank L. Ball will open his speaking
1 campaign for the Democratic nomina
, tion for the House of Representatives
tonight at Leesburg.
i He plans to speak at least twice in
each of the counties in the eighth con
> gressional district between now and the
time of the primary in August .
LOBBY COMMITTEE
WORK IS NEAR END
Cannon Examination Report
to Senate to Be Made
Next Week.
By the Associated Fress.
The spectacular career of the Senate
lobby committee is believed to be ended, j
except for a few formalities.
Committee members, who have been :
I laboring for eight months to expose the
! activities of lobbyists to public gaze, j
I have not definitely decided to suspend
operations, but they consider it unlikely
i that any further witnesses will be called, i
| The next move by the committee will
be a report to the Senate on the ex
amination of Bishop James Cannon,
jr., who defiantly refused to answer
questions about his 1928 anti-Smith ac
tivities. It will be made early next
week.
No further action against the Bishop
is planned by the committee, but Sena
tor Blaine, Republican, Wisconsin,
contends that when the report is
transmitted to the Senate, Vice Presi
dent Curtis is required by law to present
it to the district attorney for possible
contempt proceedings.
Chairman Caraway, however, main
tains the bishop did not legally refuse
to answer questions, because the com
mittee ruled it did not have authority
to question him about his political ac
tivities.
A general report on the prohibition
investigation and one on the entire
| lobby inquiry will be made later, and 1
that is expected to terminate the com- i
mittec's activity.
It began operation last October 15. un
der a resolution Introduced by Senator 1
Caraway, Democrat, Arkansas, who was j
named chairman of the committee.
Since that time approximately 100 wit
nesses have paraded before the five in
vestigators for questioning about polit
ical activities. The record consists of
approximately 2,500,000 words.
The examination of Cannon wound
up an investigation into prohibition ac
tivities of the Association Against the
Prohibition Amendment, the Anti-Sa
loon League and the Board of Temper
ance. Prohibition and Public Morals of
the Methodist Episcopal Church.
URGE BILL ENFORCING
LOCAL WAGE SCALE
Builders of Government Works
Must Pay Washington Salaries
Under New Measure.
A bill to provide that all contractors !
doing building w’ork for the District
government would have to pay laborers
and mechancis the prevailing wage
scale in Washington was recommended
to members of the Senate yesterday bv
John B. Colpovs and E. J. Murphy,
representing the buy-in-Washington
committee.
• They had in' mind the possibility of
inserting a provision in the appro
priation bill, but were advised it should
be handled as a separate piece of legis
lation. They conferred with Chairman
Capper of the Senate District commit
tee and Chairman Bingham of the Dis
trict subcommittee on appropriations.
The bill would require that the fol
lowing clause be inserted in all propo
sals for estimates on municipal proj
ects: “Provided that all wages paid me
chanics and laborers working on con
struction projects as provided for in this
bill shall be one prevailing scale as es
tablished and paid in the District of
Columbia.”
Mr. Colpovs and Mr. Murphy explain
ed that this would put all bidders on an
equal competitive basis, and also would
tend to prevent impairment of the
standards of employment of all build
ing trades, mechanics and laborers.
They said that placing this clause in
the proposals would give notice to out
of-town bidders of the wages to be paid
on District work.
■ ♦
$328,760 IS LOW OFFER
TO RESURFACE STREETS
Corson * Gruman Submit Small
est Figure in Bid for
District Work.
Corson <fc Gruman submitted the low
bid for the work of resurfacing streets
listed in the 1931 District bill. Their
bids was $328,760. W. R. Brenizer put
in the low’ bid for laying concrete road
ways, his bid being $160,384.50.
These bids carried a clause stating
that no contract would be awarded
until after enactment of the appropria
tion bill. They were filed with a iatch
of other bids for District highway work,
which must be delayed until the bill is
signed. About $2,000,000 in new con
struction of streets and roads is tied
up by failure of the conferees on the
District bill to agree on its terms.
A TTENTION!
SPECIAL HOME BARGAINS
The following houses have been traded in to us
for larger homes so we can offer them at special
bargain prices and terms.
1222 Hemlock St. N.W.
A beautiful semi-detached. four-bed-room colonial house, closed-in
porches, also fireplace and built-in garage. Drive out 16th street
and turn right to Alaska ave. to Hemlock street and then 100 feet
east to sample. Only $14,500.
3021 24th St. N.E.
A beautiful home, on lot 45x120, with stone wall in front. Entirely ,
detached with wonderful trees, vines, bushes and grape arbor, large
porches and attic. Just the home you want. Open daily, why not
drive out today? Terms easy. Drive out R. I. ave. to 24th street
and turn south one square. Only $8,950.
1621 Monroe St. N.E.
Very attractive semi-detached home with large lot and unusually large
porches. Can be used for two families if desired. Take bus to 17th
and Monroe streets N.E. or cars to 17th and R. I. ave. N.E., and walk
north to Monroe street. Only $8,950.
1218 Owen* St. N.E.
A very attractive new six-room house suitable for tw'o families, with
glassed-in porches and built-in garage. Just north of 12th and
Fla. ave. N.E., or call us for auto to inspect. Only $7,450.
765 Princeton St. N.W.
Nearly new eight-room, light brick front with built-in garage, three j
porches and Just a few steps east of Ga. ave. cars or N. H. ave. bus.
Regular price, $11,500; ours only $8,950.
If any of these locations suit you come out to
night and look them over and get a real bargain and
on terms about the same as rent. Don’t delay as
they are offered for a short time only to close out the
accounts.
H.RHOWBNSTEINfI)
$TR$$T NOHTHWE*T
________________________ i
Will Rogers
Says:

BOSTON. Mass.. June 14.—Every
body says. “Why don’t we get more
fine, high typed men In the Sen
ate?” Well, New Jersey goes on
t national exhibi
•with my own
eyes In Mexico
the way Morrow
pulled us out of
a terrible situa
tion by replac
ing politics with
• national honor
and diplomacy
with common
estly believe he
is the most competent man I ever
met, and awfully human. Few’ States
ever have such a chance. If New
Jersey turns him down they just
revert back t-o their usual oblivion.
Any man to run against him would
have to have more egotism than
State pride.
P. S. —I guess this German boy
is a fin? young man. but the con
dition the boxing game is in. it
does seem rather appropriate that
its champion should be named
Smelling, we know of no sport with
a greater odor.
SHIP FIRE PROBERS
TOLD POMP IDLE
Fairfax’s Second Assistant
Engineer Describes Finding
Main Water Not On.
Bt the Associated Press.
BOSTON. June 14. —Second Assist
ant Engineer John T. French of the
steamer Fairfax, testified today that
15 minutes after the collision Tuesday
night with the Fall River tanker Pin
this and the subsequent fire, he found
that the main fire pump had not yet
been started.
French answered questions of Chief
Inspector Dickerson N. Hoover of the
United States Steamboat Service, and
his assistants just after the opening j
of today's hearing in the Federal In- j
vestigation into the disaster, which cost
47 lives.
Low Pressure of Hose.
The engineer ..aid the two deck pumps
were working fore and aft, but that
while handling a deck hose, he said he
called the chief engineer's attention to
the low pressure. French went, to the j
engine room and found the main pump
had not been turned on.
French explained the fact by saying
that the engine room was full of smoke
and conditions w’ere bad down there.
HLs questioners then brought out that
previously the third engineer had testi
fied that the engine room was compara
tively clear of smoke, although the fire
room was full.
Couple Warned in Vain.
While on the deck with the hose.
French said, a man and w’oman with
life preservers asked him about jump
ing overboard.
“Don’t do that,” French replied,
“stay here. You’re safe here. If it
comes to going overboard, we’ll all go
together.”
Nevertheless, French testified, the
couple leaped into the sea.
Capt. Fred Gower, port captain for
the Lake Tankers’ Corporation, owners
of the Pinthis, read into the record the
nanus of the 19 members of the Pin
this crew who were lost. He was fol
lowed by A. J. Powell, Fairfax third of
ficer, whose third appearance on the
witness stand revealed that Hoover had
made another inspection of the Fairfax
last night.
Questioned About Rope.
Powell was questioned about the tes
timony of James Boggs, second steward,
who had said a Marine cut a fall rope
on lifeboat No. 7, while Boggs and Pow
ell were attempting to lower it. Powell
said the rope certainly appeared to have
been cut w’hen they examined it last
night.
Dickerson N. Hoover, inspector general
of the United States Steamboat Service,
announced that he would go to Norfolk.
Va., to hear the testimony of survivors
now in that vicinity. The hearings in
that city will begin Monday.
Hoover said there were about 15 sur
vivors, mostly service men, who will
testify at Norfolk. Among them are
Chief Petty Officer Edward Cullen.
Signalman C. D. Farrell and First
Sergt. A. E. Abbott, U. S. M. C„ who
were passengers on the Fairfax.
Brandywine High Play Last Night.
BRANDYWINE. Md.. June 14 (Spe
cial).—The senior class of Brandywine
High School presented the- three-act
comedy “Sunshine" tonight in the
school auditorium. The offering was
directed by Mrs. W. B. Early.
ST. JOHN’S CUSS
OF 61 HONORED
U. S. Attorney Rover Speaks
on Respect for Law at Pres
entation of Diplomas.
Declaring that responsibilities of good
citizenship entail respect for both civil
and divine law. United States Attorney
Leo A. Rover for the District besought ;
the 61 graduates of St. John’s College,
who received their diplomas last night,
to abide by the precept*, of their school.
Success, he added, must be “ardently
pursued if it is to be attained.”
Mgr. P. C. Gavan, pastor of the j
Shrine of the Sacred Heart, presented :
the graduates with their diplomas in j
exercises held in St. Patrick's Hall, j
George Mayon Mill, member of the
graduating class, delivered the valedic
tory and the exercises were ended with
the singing of “The Star Spangled
Banner.”
Those Given Diplomas.
Diplomas were presented to the fol- J
lowing:
Andrew Carl Auth, Ralph Francis
Butch, Edward Oscar Barnes, Francis
Ennas Beal, Charles Joseph Buettner,
James Joseph Bergin, Joseph Anton
Bogan. William Vincent Borger, Mau
rice Selby Brady. William Henry
Clarke. Edward Samuel Coffey, Roger
Charles Cooper, Charles Henry Cullen, i
Donal Martin Daley, Hugh Francis
Davies. Edward Kukri Dougherty,
Barry Francis Fox. Ralph William j
Freund, Thomas Hugh Gallagher, j
William Stanley Gamble. Walter Ber- j
nard Golden, Thomas Francis Healy,
Harry Anthony Herbert, Paul La Mar
Jones. John Anthony Judge, John j
Francis Kershaw. John James Kuhn,
Edward Thomas Lannon, William
FTancis Loughrey.
Others Given Diplomas.
John Covington Mackall, John Leo
Madden. Robert Joseph Mawhinney,
John Vincent McCarthy, George May
lon Miller, Edward James Mooney,
Charles Francis Monninger, Marshall
Henry Montrose, Andrew Joseph Mor
ris, Lawrence Key Mulvihill, Hanlon
Joseph O'Donnell, Thomas Jerome
Offutt, John Rocca O’Hanlon. John
Alexander Richards, Dominic Ricucci,
i Bruce St. John Rogerson.
I Harry Joseph Scharnikow, Lawrence
Edward Schlanser, John Dominic
Springman, Brooks John Henry Stock,
Patrick Harley Sullivan, Albert Charles
Tayman. Henry Aloysius Tolson. Vin
cent Leroy Tooemy, Roger Aloysius
Vaughan. Stanley Charles Walters.
Frank Harlow Weller, Francis Lloyd
Williamson, Richard Carlton Wills.
I Robert Lee Wilson. George Matthew
Woods and Frederick August Wildt. :
: r 11 . . . V-•'"V- ■ *■<" :• 1
• •' ■ * : -•-
1-^.
__ .■ .'Tlftilrawt
■•■•■■ ■■! 'v") S Hi
bggtilt ■’■
MKggjjL :• ■ ■ 4 ,/J
(Our Latest Creation)
Though Lower m Price
In Some Degree
Even, More Startling Than The
Sh annon ‘S Luchs
1930 Star Vlodel Home
It Is Here In The
Forest Section
i
of
Chevy Chase
Between the Chevy Chase and Columbia Country Cluhs
That we are doing really extraordinary things in the
I production of distinctive Homes along entirely new
lines both in Architecture, Construction and Price
The fact that these Homes are meet
ing with unprecedented success is
evidence that it will pay you to
INVESTIGATE
To I nspect
Drive out Conn. Ave. to Bradley Lane, turn left along the
grounds of the Chevy Chase Club, two squares to Maple Avenue,
and follow direction signs.
Shannon :&ujqflj
1435 K St. N.W.
i
'ggaagaaa 1 ===b=ssbxHear ■' ■■ ■ aßaa - aaaBMMB I
Experienced Advertisers Prefer The Star
DR. PRESTES PAYS
CURTIS RESPECTS
Hoover to Visit Brazilian
President-Elect Tomor
row Before Departure.
Dr. Julio Prestes. President-elect of
Brazil, today paid his respects to Vice
President Curtis in a call at the latter's
office in the Senate wing of the Capitol. ;
The Vice President already had met
the distinguished South American visi
tor at previous functions, so today's ex
change of courtesies was merely a
pleasant formality. Mr. Curtis immedi
ately repaid the call at the Crescent
! place residence where Dr. Prestes is
staying during his visit here,
j Dr. Prestes also shook hands with a
I number of Senators during his brief
j call at the Capitol. He expressed to
! his aides admiration for the beauty of
I the Capitol.
This evening he will share honors
i with President Hoover at a banquet in
i the Pan-American Union Building, ten- ,
dered by Senhor S. Gurgel do Amaral, j
j Brazilian Ambassador. Addresses to be,
j delivered by Mr. Hoover and Dr. Prestes
I will be broadcast in this country and ,
i Brazil by a notable radio hook-up. ;
j Both WMAL and WRC will carry the
i program locally. A special directional
I antenna at Schenectady will send the
| addresses to South America.
Dr. Prestes will take leave of Wash
ington tomorrow morning, following a
final farewell ceremony at the Crescent |
place residence. President Hoover will
j call at the house at 10:30 o'clock to
j say good-by.
Dr Prestes will pay a visit to West |
Point beforp returning to New York
j City. He will spend two weeks in Lon
don and Paris and then will return to
| his homeland.
Last year the United States was the
j greatest supplier of German imports.
FOR SALE
Attractive residence with
6 acres on edge of Rock
ville, in beautiful Montgomery
County, Md., 15 miles from
Washington, near electric cars,
bus, and R. R. Cultivated com
munity. churches, schools, stores,
etc. House hollow tile. 10
rooms. 2 baths, electric lights,
open fireplaces, delightful views.
! Garage and fine barn. Prompt
possession.
For price and inspection address
H. LATANE LEWIS
Realtor
A-3
AVOID RISK!
Sent! silver anti valuables
to our safe deposit vaults.
Jfrruritß #forag?
1140 FIFTEENTH ST
AStFE DEPOSITORY FORM YEARS
CA.ASPINWALL. PRESIDENT
{ML
. •£****2 7 75
Sansbury s
Engl Homes
In
Woodley Park
Undoubtedly Are the
Most
Remarkable Values
in the City
9 SOLD
3 Nearing Completion
Come out today and in
spect the sample house.
2924 Cortland PI.
To Reach: West on Cathedral
Ave. from Conn. Ave. to 29th St.,
then north to Cortland FI.
Open 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. Daily
COMPANY INC.
1418 Eye St. N.W. Natl. 5904

xml | txt