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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, September 10, 1931, Image 3

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J BETTER TIMES SEEN
BY SILAS STRAWN
Tells Radio Audience More
‘Faith and Fewer Nostrums’
Is Need of Day.
By the Associated Press.
Encouraging signs, in the expressed
opinion of Silas Strawn, president of
the United States Chamber of Com
merce, are appearing on the business
horizon.
He expressed this belief last night in
a radio address in which he said “more
faith and fewer nostrums” was the need
of the day.
“Let us quit talking about our troubles
end regard the present as an oppor
tunity to demonstrate our capacity for
accomplishment," he told his radio
listeners. “The whole world looks to
America for leadership. Let us justify
their expectations.
“I cannot predict when we shall
evolve out of our present economic con
dition. but when we look backward and
see that in the past we have always
come out of depressions and gone on to
greater prosperity, I am confident that
we silSll repeat our past experience.
When that recovery' will come, no one
will have the hardihood, definitely, to
forecast. Certain it is that it can only
be brought about by co-operating indi
vidual effort and not by Government
action.
Urges Courage and Optimism
“Meanwhile, let us be courageous and
optimistic. Let us have an abiding con
fidence in the fundamental soundness |
of American institutions, in the endur
ing principles of our Government. Let
us have faith in our financial institu
tions and in the securities of our in
dustries and utilities and let us be
patient and frugal.”
On the matter of wages, the former
president of the American Bar Associa
tion expressed belief that the situation;
would receive co-operation from capital
and labor.
“By reason of the lack of continuous
employment,” he said, “th? difficulties
of our wage-earners would be increased
if obliged to take a reduction in wages.
On the other hand, the wage-earners
must come to a realization that some
manufacturers cannot resume produc
tion at a cost too high for the consumer
to nay.
“Certainly no sensible American citl
ren would contemplate for a moment
precipitating this country into the dole
and unemployment insurance systems
now obtaining in Great Britain and
Germany, and which have necessitated
the appeal by those countries for out
side aid to carry the monstrous burdens
upon their treasuries. * * * The work
ers of this country don’t want doles—
they want jobs.”
1* Major Depressions.
Reviewing briefly the economic con
ditions during the last 120 years, the
speaker asserted that there had been
no less than 17 major depressions dur
ing that period, and added:
“In 1837 conditions in business and
finance were infinitely worse than they
are now, but we came out of that de
pression. as well as those of 1857, 1873.
1893. 1907. 1914, 1920 and 1921. and
went on to enjoy greater prosperity and
a higher standard of living than ever
before.”
Approval cf President Hoover’s un
employment relief organization was
linked by Strawn with the assertion
that business men are better able than
politicians to deal with conditions.
“We must come to a realization of
the patent fact that we cannot expect
to climb back immediately to the era
of unprecedented prosperity which
ended with the stock market debacle in
the Fall of 1929, but we can, by the
exercise of courage and determination,
begin now to work our way back to the
level of prosperity which obtained, say,
in 1925 ”
He predicted that the chamber’s
Continuity of Business Committee in
its forthcoming report would “point
out the peril of the dole” and indorsed
President Hoover's selection of a gen
eral committee to encourage local com
mittees to take care of their own
unemployed.
WHEAT ESTIMATES CUT
Canada Expecting Much Smaller
Crop Than Last Year.
OTTAWA. Ontario, September 10 OP).
•—The wheat crop in the three prairie
provinces was estimated at 246,400.000
bushels in a crop report issued yester
day by the Dominion Bureau of Sta
tistics.
This is substantially below the crop
of 374,500.000 bushels in 1930. While
there are bumper crops in Central Al
berta, there is a complete failure in
Southern regions. Higher wheat produc
tion is forecast in Alberta than in Sas
katchewan. although the seeded acreage
in Alberta was only about half that in
other provinces.
The tdtal estimated yield of all the
small grain crops, except Fall wheat,
is lower in 1931 than in 1930. In the
maritime provinces, conditions and
yields are very similar to 1930.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
LOCAL NO. 96. O. P. C. F. T. A., WILL
hold a primary election lor business agent
Thursday. September 10. 10*
AUTOMATIC REFHIGERATOR SERVICE,
specializing on Frieidaire: honesty and
guaranteed work. Met, 7967. 10*
PAPERHANGING —Rooms papered. $2 and
up if you have the paper; painting and
plastering. Call Col. 3588. 11*
FURNACES
—cleaned (including smoke pipe) and paint
ed for J 3.50; repairs, parts for every furnace,
steam and hot-water heating. Robey Heat
ing Co.. Isc., Lin. 1440. 1395 Fla. ave. n.e.
■WANT TO HAUL FULL O# PART LOAD
to or from New York. Richmond. Boston,
Pittsburgh and all way points; special rates.
NATIONAL DELIVERY ASSN.. INC.. 1317
N. Y. avc. Nat. 1460. Local moving also.
CHAIRS FOR RENT, SUITABLE FOR
BRIDGE PARTIES, banquets, weddings and
meetings. 10c up per day each; new chairs.
Also invalid rolling chairrf for rent or sale.
UNITED STATES STORAGE CO., 418 10th
at. n.w. Metropolitan 1844
WANTED—LOADS
FROM NEW YORK SEPT. 20
TO PHILADELPHIA SEPT. 25
TO PITTSBURGH Sept. 15
And all points North and West. aGENT
ALLIED VAN LINES We also pack and
ehip by STEEL LIFT VANS anywhere.
SMITH S TRANSFER & STORAGE CO.,
3313 You St. N.W. Phone North 3342-3348.
,With Va of Your Life in Bed
—the bed should be comfortable.
LET US RENOVATE
Your Mattresses, Box Springs and Pillows.
Real Service, at the Price You Would Pay
for the MAKE-BELIEVE Kind.
Bedell’s Factory
610 E St. Nat. 3621.
ELBERT A PEACHES
Hundreds of bushels, excellent quality, at
low prices. Drive to Rockville. Md„ 2 blocks
beyond Court House, then one mile out
Potomac rd
Rockville Fruit Farm
Concord & Niagara Grapes
at Quaint Acres
Quality Unusually Fine
• Drive out througli Silver Spring,
'v, turn right on Colesville Pike
I* (Route 27) Miles From
; l tjie District
' 1 peaches—Reaches
Chain Bridge road between Vienna and
Fairfax, Va. Chilcott Bros., tel. Vienna 18-F-3.
ROOF~WORK ~
—of any nature promptly and capably looked
after by practical roofers. Call us up.
VOOKIQ Roofing 119 3rd St. B.W
JVV/v/lsO Company District 0933
Get Acquainted
With our new location and greater
facilities for PRINTING service.
afThe National Capital Press
j# PM. Are., 3rd and N N.B. Un. MIO.
I
Appointment
CORNELL MAN HONORED BY
SCIENCE BODY.
DR. HENRY A. BARTON,
Os Cornell University, whose appoint
ment as executive secretary of the new
ly organized American institute of phy
sics was announced at a national meet
ing of the Society in Schenectady, N. Y.,
yesterday. His appointment is effective
October 1, when the new institute will
begin its work uniting several of the
large scientific societies of the United
States for the purpose of increasing co
operation between scientists and keep
ing the public informed about discov
eries of importance. —A. P. Photo.
FARM BOARD RETIREMENT
REQUESTED BY GRAIN MEN
Western Association Also Asks Re
peal of Agricultural Mar
keting Act.
I By the Associated Press.
HANLEY FALLS, Minn., September
10.—Repeal of the agricultural market
ing act and “complete retirement of the
Federal Farm Board” was asked in a
resolution adopted yesterday by the
Western Grain Men’s Association here.
The organization, with 125 members
in Western Minnesota and Eastern
South Dakota, asserted results of the
act and Farm Board operations “have
proved a distressing failure” in aiding
agriculture.
The resolution urged that Congress
appropriate no money for the Farm
Board’s revovling fund. It said “piling
up of surplus stocks of wheat and cot
ton has depressed our markets beyond
endurance.”
- ■■■ -
BEBE DANIELS MOTHER;
GIRL NAMED BARBARA
Screen Star and Daughter “Getting
Along Fine,” Says Happy
Father, Ben Lyon.
By the Associated Press.
HOLLYWOOD, September 10. —Bar-
bara Bebe Daniels Lyon, weight, 5 ,
pounds 14 ounces, was born yesterday 1
to Ben Lyon and his wife, Bebe
Daniels, featured film players.
“We are very happy and proud.” said
Lyon. “Both Bebe and Barbara are
getting along fine.”
Miss Daniels was given an extension
in her motion picture contract to pre
pare for Barbara’s arrival.
-
SEEK COUNTERFEIT PLANT
Agents Search for Source of Fake
Money in Juarez, Mexico.
EL PASO, Tex., September 10 UP). —
American secret service agents and
Mexican authorities yesterday sought
to locate a counterfeiting plant in
Juarez, opposite El Paso In Mexico.
One of seven men under arrest in
Dallas, Tex., charged with possession
and conspiracy to circulate counterfeit
money, said $lO counterfeit bills had
been purchased in Juarez for 10 cents
on the dollar, the agents reported.
The agents said the bills, some of
which had been passed In North Texas,
were counterfeits of the 1908 issue
from San Frrru.sco. They were
printed on good paper, but from a
poorly etched engraving.
GROSNER’S 132 5 F STREET
Friday Only'.
Specials,
Regular $1 and $1.50 Pure Silk
Full-Fashioned Hose
Pure silk full-fashioned hose with m
buffer heel and toe. Included are the P I
popular shades for the season. Also
clocked hose in plain colors with con-
trasting clocks.
Regular $3.50 to $5 New Fall
HATS
Snappy new models for the well V W •*JO
dressed man. All the popular shades and X.
shapes that are in vogue.
Also —Special Group of
Kuppenheimer & Grosner
SUITS $-. Q 95
A fine selection of suits suit- I
able for Fall wear. Full-weight I
and 3-piece suits that will catch ■ M
the eye of the well dressed man.
No alterations, no C. O. D.’s, no
deliveries. /
Formerly $45
All Sales Final
©RCJ'NEIBJ' I
1325 F STREET
V ' ■*
a
THE EVENING STAR. WASHINGTON. 1). «•.. . ~SJ)AY, BKI.-J*,:. i.ER 10, 19S1.
READS BIOGRAPHY
OF FRANK HARRIS
Kate Stephens Reviews Life
of Writer Who Maligned
Her Sweetheart.
/
By the Associated Press.
NEW YORK, September 10.—Kat-s
Stephens, now a silvered spinster of 78,
is busy reading the final chapters of
a biography of Frank Harris, the ec
centiic writer, who once made dispar
aging references to her sweetheart,
Prof. Byron Caldwell Smith.
Miss Stephens is perusing Dr. A. I.
Tobin’s life of Harris. She is the sur
viving figure in a romance and tragedy
of post Civil War days in Kansas and
is probably the last person alive in this
country who knew Harris continuously
from his boyhood days in the Univer
sity of Kansas.
Harris had projected himself into
Kate Stephens’ life by making his ref
erences to her dead lover, Prof. Smith,
in his suppressed “Life and Loves,"
which won him the title of “bad boy
of American letters.”
Harris attended the university at
Lawrence in 1875 and studied under
Prof. Smith. So did Kate Stephens.
The Kansas girl managed her father’s
1,000 acres from girlhood and after
young Smith’s death in 1877 became the
first to attain a professorship In Greek
and Latin in an American university.
Later she wrote many books and was
an editor in the house of Macmilan.
Today, in an obscure flat on the lower
West Side of Manhattan, she is going
over the Tobin book, which will appear
next month. Her gray-blue eyes are
clear and twinkling. She wears her
White hair in a boyish bob. She appears
60 and works with the vigor of even
fewer years at her writings and the
management of the company which
publishes them.
“Dr. Tobin’s book will give the first
really faithful picture of Frank’s strange
personality,” Miss Stephens asserted.
"So many impressions of Harris need
correcting; so many things he said and
wrote gave the public a distorted picture
of him. He seemed to strive for unreal
and gross effects about himself.
“Frank Harris probably lied more
cruelly about himself in his ‘Life and
Loves’ than he did about Prof. Smith.”
In 1929 Kate Stephens published
“Lies and Libels of Frank Harris.” It
was her answer to Harris’ calumnies
of the long-dead Kansas educator. Their
romance had been set forth twice pre
viously in book form, the latest volume
bearing the title "The Love Life of
Byron Caldwell Smith" and giving the
full texts of love letters they exchanged.
After the Tobin biography of Harris
I has been made ready for the presses
Kate Stephens will turn to the WTitlng
of another book.
“I must work." she explained. “It
enables me to forget.”
LONE VOYAGER IN PORT
Tennesseean Reaches Honolulu
From Japan on World Cruise.
HONOLULU, September 10 (fP). —
Sailing alone around the world In a
37-foot boat, Edward Miles, 52-year- I
old Memphis. Tenn., contractor, ar- j
rived here safely yesterday from Yoko-
I hama, which port he left July 14.
The vessel Is equipped with a 20-
horsepower auxiliary oil engine which,
however, is seldom used. j
Will Rogers
Says:
BEVERLY HILLS. Calif. —Mexico
just joined the League of Nations.
Since we went
broke we have
never been In
vited in. If the
South don’t raise
any cotton next
year it will just
be their luck to
have the Boll
weevil change its
diet and switch
over to some
thing else, with
no cotton in the
P
South next year they can devote all
their time to politics instead of just
two-thirds of it. Wilkins is bringing
the Nautilus home to get a new tow
rope.
MURIEL McCORMICK IS BRIDE
OF WEALTHY NEW ENGLANDER
Granddaughter of Rockefeller
Married to Elisha D.
Hubbard Today.
Ceremony at Bar Harbor
Takes Place 24 Hours After
Engagement Made Known.
By the Associated Press.
BAH HARBOR. Me., September 10.—
Muriel McCormick, granddaughter of
John D. Rockefeller, and Elisha D.
Hubbard, wealthy bachelor of Middle
town. Conn., were married at noon to
day at the Summer home here of Mr.
and Mrs. George A. McKinlock of Chi
cago. The ceremony was performed by
Rev. William E. Patterson of Bar
Harbor.
No guests were present.
The wedding of the daughter of Mrs.
Edith Rockefeller McCormick of Chi
cago and the 52-year-old Middletown
banker took place barely 24 hours after
the announcement of their engagement
in a Jetter sent to the bride's mother.
Bride Is 29.
Mrs. Hubbard, who Is 29, is the
eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mc-
Cormick, who were divorced in 1921 .
The announcement of her engage
ment added another chapter to her
many activities which frequently have
figured in the news. She was es
tranged from her father when he mar
ried Mme. Ganna Walska, the singer.
On another occasion she announced she
had "met” George McKinlock, Jr., the
dead son of Mrs. Georg- A. McKinlock,
her chaperon, at a spiritualistic seance,
and she proclaimed him as her "spir
itualistic bridegroom.” She had never
met George, jr„ who was killed in the
World War, but after the proclamation
She wore a wedding ring.
Interested in Stage.
In recent years Mrs. Hubbard has
spent much of her time with Mr. and
Mrs. McKinlock in Chicago, Palm
Beach, Fla., and B ( ar Harbor. She has
been a leading figure in Red Cross
and other charity drives in Chicago,
and was the first woman guarantor of
the Chicago Civic Opera.
After her social debut Mrs. Hub
bard became actice in theatricals, and
reports were current at one time that
she was considering a motion picture
career. However, she devoted her en
ergies to the legitimate st3ge, appearing
in as well as supporting a number of
amateur theaters. Last Winter she
financed and organized the playhouse
at Palm Beach. At times her aim was
toward the opera, although net profes
sionally. She has devoted much time
to voice culture.
In 1922 Mrs. Hubbard appeared be-
Enjoy a Delightful Breakfast,
Luncheon, Dinner or Supper at
gs 7*th Year
cUamm^
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Connecticut Avc.
Telegraph
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EVERY ROACH
Hiding Won’t
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rpHE Dettael mist penetrates every
A hiding place behind cracks and
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Detbal doesn’t stun or chase them
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Works equally well on ants, bedbugs,
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Buy Datbol today and have a delight
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Dethol
TOMORROW
ISfP
Look on Page B 8 & 9
For An Important
Announcement
Os a Great
One-Day-Sale!
Worthwhile Saying*
In AD Departments
W |j|
P jfl
■Lgvp
Hi .. . m i
'• yysißs
MRS. ELISHA P. HUBBARD.
hind the footlights under the name of
“Nawanna Micor” and last April she
was Mona Lisa In “The Face” at the
Palm Beach playhouse.
She has also found time fer yachting
and is regarded as an accomplished
yachtswoman.
MORE CASH CIRCULATED
Treasury Show’s $1.60 Per Cnpita
Increase for August.
The per capita circulation of money !
in the United States increased $1.66
during August, the Treasury announced
yesterday. Money circulated during the
month totaled $5,051,333,592.
The latter figure showed an increase
of approximately $214,000,000, as com
pared with the $4,837,084,512 In cir
culation on July 31. The per capita in
creased from $38.65 in July to $40.31 at'
the end of August.
Total money in the country increased 1
$206,873,061 to $9,360,175,387. Os this
amount $4,993,937,887 was in gold.
ADVERTISING
MAN
Must Be Expert
For Part-Time Work
Replies Confidential
Address Box 47-D, Star Office
rich flavor
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GULDEN'S
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Less handicapped nowadays
If
(i Neio ideas on personal likely to be upset and thrown
' hygiene responsible,” ° ff balan ?> ,he >’ take s P ecial
JO , measures.
says doctor - , -. . ..
What doctors advise girls to use
" on such occasions is Nujol—a
THE DOCTOR in a leading spoonful every night for several
women's college was com- days beforehand helps to keep
paring this generation of girls everything normal even under
with those of 25 years ago. abnormal conditions. For it con
... , tains absolutely no drugs or
“We don t have nearly so many medic ; nc> Per f e cted by the fa
illness excuses from girls nowa- mous N * oI Laboratories, 2 Park
days, he said. Not even at Avenuc> New Yor k City. Try
0 those times when there is per- treatment f or the next three
fectly good reason for their feel- months> and see j f Jt doesn ’ t
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girls have learned how important Yo u’ll wonder how you eve r did
it is to keep their systems func- without k . ,
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And at times when they are most Be sure you get the genuine*
— Advtrtlgemcat.
POWERS’ PAST TRAIL
LEADS TO PITTSBURGH
Search for “Charles Kodgers” Men
tioned by “Bluebeard'’ Slayer
Is Begun.
By the Associated Press.
PITTSBURGH. September 10.—
Efforts to trace the past of Harry F.
Powers, 42, matrimonial'- agent who
recently confessed the murder of five
persons whose bodies were found in a
ditch near Clarksburg, W. Va„ shifted
to Pittsburgh today.
Deputy Simeon Bond and City De
tective Carl Southern of Clarksburg
came here early today and conferred
with George Murrcn, chief of Allegheny
County detectives, before searching for
a man named “Charles Rodgers,” fre
quently mentioned by Powers since his
incarceration.
When Powers was arrested shortly
after Mrs. Asta Eicher's disappearance
was revealed, the matrimonial agent
told police in Clarksburg that Mrs.
Eichor had gone to Denver, Colo., In
company of "a man named Rodgers.”
Later, after the bodies were found.
Powers said he had taken Mrs. Eicher
and her three children to Clarksburg
at the request of a "Mr. Rodgers.”
Bond and Southern refused to discuss
their mission upon their arrival, but
Murren came to the Detective Bureau
i before daybreak and went into confer
ence with the West Virginia officers.
Ask Dry Modification.
BRIDGEPORT, Conn., September 10
UP).— The Connecticut Federation of
Labor yesterday adopted resolutions fa
voring the moderation of the Volstead
act and favoring the release of Thomas
‘J. Mooney from prison In California.
WANTED
REAL ESTATE
We have buyers for well located
| Northwest homes atjair prices, also
investment properties showing good
I return. List with
ISkANNONALUCHSI
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) ~
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To Inspect: Call or Phone
■CBEBEZafiM
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION I
TENOR SOLOIST and director wanted. Epis
copal church; directing experience neces
sary: snlary. S3O month; state experience I
and age. Address Box 28-D, Star office. * I
EDUCATIONAL. ~
MORNING
[Accountancy
Fall Term Begins Sept. 14
7:00 to K:4O
Also Evening. 5:30 and 7:30 '
2 Southeastern University
I 1730 G SI. N.W, (Y.M.C.A.) Na. 0250
i A SELECT SCHOOL •
A Bull sen School with University at
mosphorc, rsguiring high tchotl gradui
-1 luwl tl.n and character reference*. Cultural
and eeclal advantage*. Secretarial train.
lag as callage grade. Employment lerviee.
;; WASHINGTON SCHOOL FOR
! | wash"^H n c c cAcritawii |
The Temple School, Inc.
Meets Individual Requirements
in
Business and Secretarial
Training
Classes Now Forming
Day—Late Afternoon—Evening
Felix Mahony’s
National Art School
Our Eight Months Professional
Courses Fit You to Accept a
Position in Color, Interior Decora
tion, Costume Design, Commercial
Art, Posters. Children's Satur
day Class Work.
1747 R. I. Ave. North 1114
(aa ne- EVEn7nG^‘
|SCHOOL r ,U^|
■ SOt'THEASTERN I'NIVERSITY
■ Fall Term begins Sevt. 21
5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Also Mornlnc. 7:00 to 3 40
g 1730 G St. N.W. (Y.M.C.A.) Nn. *750 ■
THE WOMANS COLLEGE ~
OF WASHINGTON. D. C.
S.E. Cor. 12th A F Ste. N.W., Met. «337
Very low tuition rates by enrolling now.
Gregg and Pitman Shorthand. Speed Dicta
tion. Typewriting. English. Mathematics. I
Piling. Statistics. Prepare lor next sten. &
type exam. Instruction 5 days A 5 nights
each week. Complete Secretarial Course. ♦ ‘
- EVENING*^.
(High schoou
I . Fully Aeeredited
Washington Preparatory School I
■ Opens Sept. 9—Coeducational
I 1738 G St. N.W. <Y. M. C. A.) I
g National 8230 g |
@ Tivoli Theater
Building
Telephone Columbia 3000
W Vh *KS?"O
A Leading Preparatory School for Boys I
Arrredlted—Exceptional Athletic Facilities
Men Teachers Only—Sixth Grade Thru
High School
Opens Sept. 21—Send for Catalog
1736 G St. N.W. (Y. M. C. A.)
Nat. 8250
DICTATION CLASSES
Slow, medium, last dictation. Review of i
last half of the manual: typing, evening I
classes; all for J 2 per month; tuition re- 1
funded If dissatisfied: courses given as an
advertising feature. For information, apply
In person only. <No leters. no phone calls).
Entire fifth fioor. National Press Bldg.
M. S. GINN & CO.
school**#
LK Jf UNIVERSITY ATMOSPHERE
DAY OR
EVENING FOR DETAILS
See
I CLASSIFIED
PHONE BOOK
PAGE 337
“COLUMBIA COLLEGE ]
Secretarial and Accountancy Course*
Day and Evening
New Classes Now Beginning
P. O. Bldg., 1413 Park Rd. Col. 7078
National University
Fall Term Begins September 2*. 1931
SCHOOL OF LAW
School of Economic*
and Government
Registrar's Office
Open for Registration 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
818 13th STREET N.W.
Tel. Na. 8617
> 'll ■■ ' ■ ■ *
The
GEORGE WASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY
One Hundred and Eleventh Year
All Classes Resume
September 23, 1931
The Junior College
Columbian College (Letters and Sciences)
The Graduate Council of the University
The School of Medicine
The School of Nursing
* The School of Law
The School of Engineering
The School of Pharmacy
The School of Education
The School of Government
The Division of Library Science
The Division of Fine Arts
The Division of University and Extension Students
The Summer Sessions
REGISTRATION September 19,21,22
For Catalogues and Information Apply
THE REGISTRAR 2033 G Street N.W.
WASHINGTON, D. C.
1,1 ' n
A-3
EDUCATIONAL.
Federal Income Taxation !
I Beginning Sept. IK. at 7:.Vi n.m.. and
meeting every Frit's*- until Janusry 15.
Frederick L. Pearce, LL.B.
C.P.A.
Instrnetor
; SOUTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY
1738 G St. N.W. IV.M. C. A.) Na. *250
r —MORNING
fSC"OOL”IAvI
I SOUTHEASTERN I'NIVERSITY I
Fall Term begins Sept. 21
.. TOO to 8:40 a.m.
Also Evening. 5:39 to 7:30
I WOOD’S SCHOOL
311 E. Capitol St Line. 0038
46th Year
A SECRETARIAL SCHOOL
MICH PERSONAL HELP
Day and Evening Session*
F ®!<f Week*—Dav. *18; Evening-. *9.68
COLRT F. WOOD, LL. M.. Prin.
EVENING-Vt
lOUNTANCV
Term Begins Sept. 14
5:30 and 7:30
■o Morning, 7:00 to X:!0
heastern University
St. N.W. (Y.M.C.A.) Na.K2.50
ACCOUNTANCY
Pace Courses: B. C. S and M. C. S
degrees: day and evening classes: CPA
preparation; co-educational. Send for 25th
year book.
Benjamin Franklin University
302 Transportation Bldg. Met. 2515
Art—Advertising
Interior Decoration
Costume Design—Life Class
Children’s Saturday Gass
1333 F St. N.W. ME. 2883
Washington
COLLEGE of MUSIC
The 28th year opens
Sept. Bth. Courses in all
yH'jtjr'fJjXsubjects leading to diplo
|9l yjj\ Jr) mas and degrees which
reiTHIT/*/ are issued by authority of
yfSfipQf a charter granted by the
State of Virginia and cer
tified to by the Board of Education of
the District of Columbia.
2107-09 S St. Potomac 1846
GEORGETOWN
LAW SCHOOL
' 1931-1932
SESSIONS COMMENCE
Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1931
For Late Afternoon Classes
Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1931
For Morning Classes
Derreet of LL. 8.. LL. M.. J. D.
Granted
Hath J. Fegan. M. A.. LL. M., Fh. D.
Assistant Dean
Georgetown Law School
506 E Street N.W.
Telephone National 7293
M Sound, sincere, practical
Msmnmunr commercial art training in
1C all Its phases. Individual
ÜBiSH ■■■■■ Instruction and guidance
ÜBU|EI4.!AL by a nationally known
—gg-vmnaß artist. Constructive criti
elsm. no flattery of stu
ilkßnO dents’work. No extrava
4.MUHLBL. gant promises. You are
niitriet A ixn cordially invited to visit
fEEHBIHDHIEXKEEEIDhfi'
[the American!
UNIVERSITY |
Co-educational n
GRADUATE SCHOOL |
SCHOOL OF THE
POLITICAL SCIENCES |
1901-1909-1907 r Street N.W. g
: First Semester Registration Open Now g
For information call
Metropolitan 2300
College of Liberal Arts |
Mass, and Nebr. Axes. N.W. |
■ First Semester Resistratlon Open Now a
For Information Call Cleve. 0798 H

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