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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 14, 1931, Image 27

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1931-10-14/ed-1/seq-27/

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RECLUSE TO SEEK"
“REST OF MONEY”
Mrs. Ida Wood Says She Will
Continue Search as Soon
as Ankles Get Better.
By the Associated Pres*.
NEW YORK, October 14—Just as
soon as her ankles get better, Mrs. Ida
Wood intends to “go out and look for ,
the rest of my money.”
The folds of her old-fashioned gowns :
and hiding places in her hotel room al- t
ready have yielded a fortune in cur
rency and bonds —nearly a million dol
lars. The 70-pound, 93-year-old lady
insists, however, that there is more.
Her ankle weakness, physicians said.
Is due to lack of nutrition during the
months she lived frugally in her sim
ple quarters with bundles of SIO,OOO
banknotes, diamonds and other costly
jewels within arm's reach.
Mrs. Wood, after years of living on
such a slender budget as to call for
the purchase of a single egg at a time,
would be dismayed at the amount al
ready expended in her behalf since the
court has taken over her affairs.
Bills filed with the court and ap
proved. it was reported today, include
a physician's fee of $3,800, and $7,900
to a detective agency which has main- j
tained guards at the hotel since last
March.
The bond of Mrs. Woods guardian,
Otis Wood, was raised from $225,000 to
$1,000,000 yesterday, after other claim
ants to relationship had filed protests.
Wood is a nephew. The opposing fac
tion is headed by Mrs. William C.
Shields, a step-granddaughter.
Five trunks belonging to Mrs. Wood
were opened yesterday, and another
small fortune in gems was found. There
were watches set with rose diamonds,
xare necklaces and heavy bracelets.
The most valuable jewelry of all—
the diamond necklace Mrs. Wood wore
at the Infanta Eulalia ball in Madison
Square Garden in 1893 —has not been
found. Other trunks remain to be
opened, and it may be in one of them;
or it may be that it Is concealed in
some unsound cache which Mrs. Wood
had in mind when she said she would
“go out and look for the rest of my
money as soon as my ankles get well.”
RAIL HEAD SAYS UNITY
TO CUT WAGE LACKING
Southern Line President Tells
Stockholders Pay Slash
Untimely.
Bv the Associated Press.
RICHMOND, Va„ October 14.—Fair
fax Harrison, president of the Southern
Railway Co., announced to stockholders
yesterday at their annual meeting that
there is a lack of necessary unanimity
imong executives of the railway to effect
a wage reduction among employes of
the company.
Mr. Harrison said a group of seven
executives, of w’hich he is a member,
had considered the wage question for
several months, and that some members
are of the opinion that the present is
not the time to bring on a congressional
discussion of the matter.
“The railroads can be operated on a
paying basis if given a free hand, Mr.
Harrison said. He added that one road
cannot initiate wage reduction nego
tiations, but that such a movement must
come from all.
Guy Gary, Walter S. Case and
Richard S. Reynolds, all of New York,
and Henry W Miller of the District
of Columbia were re-elected to the di
rectorate for three-year terms.
Mr. Harrison declined to discuss the ;
dividend question, asking the stockhold
ers to continue to have confidence in
their directors. He said the company ;
will not earn Its fixed charges In 1931.
.
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I RUINS OF FOUR TOWNS FOUND
ON SAME SITE IN ARIZONA,
*
Distinct Civilizations Indicated by Tim
bers and Relics Wbicb Smithsonian Ex
pert, Dr. Roberts, Has Uneartbed.
BY THOMAS R. HENRY.
Ruins of four ancient towns on top of ■
each other, representing four distinct j
! “civilizations” extending about 2,000
I years into the past, were discovered this i
Summer by Dr. F. H. H. Roberts. jr„ of j
i the Smithsonian Institution, who has i
| just returned to Washington after four j
; months in the field.
, This site was found on top of a low
mesa in Eastern Arizona to which the
Smithsonian archeologist was attracted
by the standing ruins of two large stone
i buildings, about 1.000 years old, ad
! jacent to a small village of Navajo In
dians.
The ruined buildings, he found, were
pueblos built during the so-called
“pueblo three” period in the pre-his
toric Southwest when the Indians
reached their highest civilization, a few'
centuries before the coming of the
j Spaniards. These in themselves were
: imposing structures. The largest was
120 leet long and 90 feet wide, with
parts of the third story still standing.
Tite other was 100 feet long and about
50 feet wide, with a great ceremonial
chamber, 60 feet in diameter, in the
j center.
Dr. Roberts found that thesa great
buildings, all that were left of a large
settlement, were built on about 14 feet
of ruins and debris left by still earlier
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THE EVENING STAB. WASHINGTON. P. C„ WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 19.11.
peoples. The site, commanding a wide
l view of the surrounding country, had
i been favorable for human occupancy
| from the time the country first was ln
i habited. He confined his work to ex
cavating the bottom two layers.
At the bottom of the debris he found
! ruins of pit houses, essentially cellars
! covered with a timber roof, and skeletal
| remains of a small-boned, . narrow
beaded people. These were the ancient
basketmakers who flouished In the
Southwest before the coming of the
apartment house dwellers. These pit
houses were built at about the begin
ning of the Christian era. Dr. Roberts
believes that it will be possible to date
them exactly because in two cases the
timber roofs of the excavations had
been caved in by fire, which did not
entirely destroy the wood. The old
Umbers are still so well preserved that
experts can determine the exact year
they were cut from the forest by the
“rings” denoting the annual growth of
the trees. Dr. Roberta and his aides
dug out 15 of these pit. houses. The
basket maker layer of debris, because
of the peculiar nature of the houses,
was very thin.
Quite Different Race.
The second oldest layer revealed
skeletons of a big-boned, round-headed
people, racially quite different from the
basketmakera. whose skull* frequently
were flattened in the back because of
the pracUce of attaching babies to
cradle board*. Usually there is a sharp
, differentiation between the basket
makers, and these sturdier invaders
who began to build large structures.
Here, however, the two peoples seem to
have succeeded each other without any
Interval, and may actually have lived
in the ancient town at the same time.
Roberts found several Instances where
the Invaders had simply settled down
in the abandoned pit houses, altering
them slightly in accordance with their
own architectural idea*.
On top of this were the “pueblo
two” and “pueblo three” ruins, exca
vation of which was reserved for an
other year. The site 1* of special im
portance because of its exceptional size
—SOO yards long by 200 yards wide,
strung along the top of the ridge—and
because of the continuous chronologi
cal sequence. It represents a contin
uously ascending civilization from the
crude beginnings to the “golden age”
of ancient North America.
At the peak of its culture the vil
lage apparently was abandoned sud
, denly. There is no trace of the “pueblo
four” culture, a considerably degener
ated form which was flourishing when
the Spanish explorers came to the
Southwest.
Inlaid Tobacco Pipe.
Besides the skeletons recovered from
the 45 graves that were opened—ln
many cases only small bits of bone— I
,= =^g= : '
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and a Booklet on coffee making. RICH AND FULL-BODIED
Dr. Robert* found numerous bone and
atone Implements, arrowheads, axes,
pottery, knives, etc. The most prized
specimen was a clay tobacco pipe in
laid with turquoise, evidently the pos
session of some great chief of the first
invasion of the Pueblo peoples. From
the same period came a delicately
carved stone effigy of a small bird, pre
sumably of a religious nature. Four
strings of beads were recovered, about
2,000 beads in all, together with the
ancient clay pots whose designs are
of great value to archeologists in de
termining culture sequences.
Because of the large size of the an
cient town it is estimated that about
three years will be required to excavate
it completely and the Smithsonian In
stitution plans to follow up this work.
Roberts this Summer located the cor
ners and angles of the buildings so that
work can be started without delay next
year.
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THE SCULL SALES CO^P.
Conduit Rd. and Elliot PI. N.W. Cleve. 5810
Washington, D. C.
ACTRESS IS THREATENED
Patay O’Day’a Mate H V Gun Duel
With Prowler—Home Guarded.
HOLLYWOOD. Calif.. October 14 OP).
—The home of Patsy O’Day, screen
actress, was guarded by police yesterday
after her husband. C. J. Joynt, reported
exchanging pistol shots with two prowl
ers at the residence Sunday.
Joynt said numerous threatening
(PILE-FOE acts like made for blind,
bl(ed In i. protruding er itehlnc
FILER. Relief come* euirkly. Sooth
ing, healing, proms goes on several
dan—then PILE agony will leave yen
or money refunded. SI at good drug
atom.
telephone calls had been received by the
actress during the last two weeks, and
on one occasion she drove a prowler
from the back door at the point of >
Burt's I
1343 F Street :
, Specials in f
Ladies' f
Evening Slippers f
iv Moire and satin— £
black and white; pop- s
\ N. ular shapes*
L !v I v A Were Up to sl2£o
i • r s 6 :Bs i i
> Gleaming cut steel *
I) buckles for adom-
Hment of these slippers* :
j s3.°° j
I Reduced from much higher ;
prices.
For three days—Thursday,
Friday and Saturday. •
Remember caring for feet v *
is better than curing them.
Park at the Capital Garage at Our Expense
- - ■
pistol. On one occasion they returned
home to And some one had broken Into
the house. •
No explanation was made by Jqynt. -„
B-11

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