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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 04, 1931, Image 55

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NORTH 1742
UPHOLSTERING
GET OUR ESTIMATES.
SEGAL BROS.
1232 1 4th ST. N. W.
"W» Liv Our Prof—tion"
"Take it
easy,"—
he says
1
Yes, easy’s the
word for a
Chipso washday.
Now I’m using
NEW CHIPSO FLAKES
my HUSBAND knows
I WON’T be GROUCHY
on WASHDAY NIGHT!
* * *
I’m GOOD COMPANY now
no more BACKACHES
from HARD RUBBING.
* * *
The NEW CHIPSO FLAKES
PILE UP the BIGGEST
and BEST SUDS that
I've ever SEEN I
* * *
They BUBBLE OUT
the meanest DIRT in a
QUICK SOAKING!
* * *
I do hope YOU’LL TRY
NEW CHIPSO FLAKES—
and get SPEED SUDS!
I
, - . t . 1
I
'
Every ingredient in FLAKO is
chosen for its quality. That is
why pie crusts made with
FLAKO will always be so light,
flaky and with that rare old fash
ioned flavor. Just add water to
FLAKO and your pie crust is
ready to roll and bake.
Ask your grocer for FLAKO.
Floko Products Copporetlon
Ntw Brunswick, N. J.
Endorsed by Qood Housekeeping
Strong
soaps? Not
for me!”
The new Chipso
flakes keep my
han !s so nice!
Now the CHILDREN
are RIG I have
TIME for SOCIETY.
* * *
I'd he ASHAMED
to PLAY at CARD PARTIES
if I used STRONG SOAP!
* * *
But I CHANGED to
NEW CHIPSO FLAKES
and my HANDS
have SMOOTHED OUT
and LOOK PRETTY!
* * *
Those BIG CHIPSO SUDS
cut DISHPAN GREASE—
they SOAK OUT dirt
vet they're MILD to
COLORED SILK UNDIES.
* * *
Do wash DISHES
with NEW CHIPSO FLAKES
—they make SPEED SUDS!
Enjoying Healthy Conditions
BT LTD1A LE BARON WALKER.
IT you would have health and hap
piness don't talk about sickness
and forget there is such a term
as financial depression. No one
ever got well as the result cf
dwelling on her suffering, nor became
wealthy contemplating how hard up
she was These are negative thoughts.
TALKING OF ONE'S AILMENTS
LEAVES A WOMAN MENTALLY AND
PHYSICALLY DEPRESSED.
destructive ideas The minute you stop
considering your physical ailments in
their misery-making form and start
to think of ways cf coping with them
and getting the better of them, then
you have faced recovery. Your ideas
are constructive The thought is
"What can I do to get well?" instead
of "How terribly I am suffering!"
This does not mean that the pain
stops with the thought, but it does
signify that, bad as it is. you Intend
that you shall succeed in grtting the
better of it. and not that it shall get
the better of you This d»t®rmined at
titude to get well Is one of the greatest
helps a doctor can have in his efforts
to cure you. Give him this aid and
note how much more effective the
medicines and the treatments will
prove, for you are working with them
and not in opposition. Stop talking
of yur aches and pains.
Talk about any smallest improve
ment, or good condition. If you try
to find these you will discover some
thing that will be cheering f r those
about you to hear and, incidentally,
something that will be cheerful for you
yourself to dwell upon
When you are in this happy frame
of mind you are actually fostering
g od health, since happiness is a fine
tonic. If you really want to g't well
and stay well you must steer clear of
sickness as a topic of conversation.
Strange as it may seem, there are per
sons who "enjoy po'r health.” They
delight in describing in detail all their
horrid symptoms and disagreeable feel
ings. Few of us are willing to be
classed with this group, but unless we
stop talking sickness w» show one dis
tinct sign of entering the e mpany.
As for talking cf depression, every
one really knows to do so keeps the
mind on the wrong side of the problem
THE STAR’S
DAILY PATTERN
SERVICE
Still another new and splendid model
for general day occasions.
And it's designed on the wrap-over
lines, that give the figure charming
slenderness The kilted plaited arrange
ment of the skirt is youthful. The
neckline is very smart.
Of course, a sheer woolen made the
original. It was black with almond
green woolen trim. The bone buttons
were in matching green shade.
Style No 34'7 is designed for size* 16.
’8 years, 36, 38, 40, 42 and 44 Inches
bun.
Size 36 requires 2\ yards 54-in'h
material and l2 yard 39-inch contract
ing.
This jaunty model is stunning in
tweed mixtures, canton crepe and jer
cey.
For a pattern of this style, send 15
cents in stamps or coin directly to The
Washington Star's New York ‘ Fashion
Bureau, Fifth avenue and Twenty-ninth
•treet, New York.
f
A great step in the right direction
was made when in one community
where citizens worked for betterment
of financial conditions they decided to
to call the work of dispensing the
fund ‘ Improving employment orndi
tions,” rather than helping the un
employed.
(Oopyrliht, 1031.)
NATURE’S
CHILDREN
BY LILLIAN COX ATHEY.
Illustrations by Mary Foley.
LIFE OF A CATERPILLAR.
A CATE1RPILLAR may be the off
spring of a moth or a butterfly
Some of them are beautifully
marked. After you have be
come familiar with the butterflv
and the moth you can tell whose child
is eating your vegetable or tree.
They have beautiful coats of many
colors They have horns and warts and
tufts of hair. They have the ability to
imitate their surroundings, and some of
them are provided with atomizers. When
thus gifted, it is with a feeling of sad
ness you remember the caterpillar who
used you for a target.
Some are like little woolly bears and
curl up in a small ball if molested
Others have spines that break off if
touched. They burn like fury, and that
involves another caterpillar you can re
member easily.
Th° silkworm is the offspring of a
creamy white moth. H° eats the leaf
Of the mulberry and turns his spittle
into a thread of strong silk about 1.000
feet long It is very curable and can
be unwound on to a specially- made
shuttle. His product is worth about
$500,000,000 a year.
There are caterpillars which dine
upon our cabbage, bean, celerv and
nearly every vegetable we plant. There
are others which wait in the egg state
through freezing weather until our
fruit trees have tender leaves on them
The tent caterpillar builds a huge cir
cuslike tent and eats every leaf the
tree puts forth.
Some caterpillars crawl about, others
drop from silken ropes to the food near
by. Rarely do their parents partake of
food. But their children surely don't
take after them
The days of the caterpillar are spent
eating and outgrowing their clothes
When ready to Chang* a garment, they
fast for a day or two. While they are
standing still upon a rug of silk or
hanging tightly to a twig, the old gar
ment splits down the back, and the
newly clad specimen steps out of his
oast-off suit, which Is left hanging to
the boughs in a most untidy fashion.
The new suit is a loose-fitting one
Soon It is a little too snug for comfort
and is discarded. Several suits are ex
changed in the lifetime of a fat cater
pillar He lives to ear. Some of these
fellows get to be very la*g» The
hickory horn d»vll grows to the length
of 5 inches. He Is a very handsome
crea*ur® Hts great horns and warts
make him a fearsome looking fellow,
who depends upon his size and looks to
keep his enemies away.
When ready to exchange this form
and stage of existence for that of the
gay and free moth or butterfly, the
caterpillar spins a shelter of silk If he
is the offspring of the moth, and if of
the butterfly he Is likely to weave a
strong rop- of silk, fasten the ends to
a silken button and swing from this
halter.
Each spe-ies has a special type of
covering. Some line leaves with silk 1
and draw the edges about them O h’rs
weave blankets and other snug, tight
homes. They always provide for their
entrance Into the world again by leav
ing a flap or exit handy.
They are often made the babv car
riage of parasitic flies. Their soft body I
is easily punctured by the clever fly
mother The days of these victimized
caterpillars are numbered and are fi'led
with a gnawing, empty feeling. The
little enem'es are consuming hts body
end his life is the price of their exist
ence.
__ (Copyright. 13"! >
Juniors
sweet on
a girl—’
But Chipso makes
extra washes
so easy!
NOTHING like a
GIRL-CRAZY BOY
for piling EXTRAS
into the WASHTUB!
* * *
But I'm through RUBBING!
CHIPSO Suds BUBBLE
OUT the DIRT—
and my CLOTHES
are as CLEAN
as a NEW WHISTLE!
* * *
NO other soap
can touch CHIPSO for
HONEST-TO-GOODNESS
SUDS!
They’re FINE for COLORS,
and they CERTAINLY
AGREE with my HANDS.
* * *
You ought to try
the NEW CHIPSO FLAKES.
They make SPEED SUDS
IN LUKEWARM WATER!
i —--—.
MODES
.--BE the moment
Oc~ieL giAAs ujLi/u 6SI &Zr~
Cr ‘-rrir7_t^ri_rcAcc. Arcnrt_ uJ AAir's
A-cnJ^ rr A£^uC t^c^scrrUs.
A ‘-cAuy-eA a^c a_ /rnD'i, *u*A»
uJlAA g°~£A. s£i£eA<Aa,
f<r&L n^ALu^L, CU.A /ZaAa
ctx. Srentirt, su+rU pusnp, 4_nA iu)0
*'-+**- Stfs UJLUL
A
LSL*
“BONERS”
Humorous Tid-Bits From
School Papers.
Caesar was a good guy. but he got
kinda high hat. Cassius was a low
down politician who wanted Caesars
job and so he did him dirt.
The Spanish Main was a boat which
played an imp rtant part in history.
It was sunk in the harbor of Havana
Ostriches and kangaroos are closely
related because they both have long
necks.
What is a seminary? A place where
they bury the dead
An important bill passed in 1854 was
the “Buffalo Bill."
(CoByrisht, 1931 1
Special Cole Slaw. ,
Combine one egg yolk with one-fourth
cupful of prepared mustard, salt, sugar
and pepper to taste and half a cupful of
rour cream. Pour ever three cupfu’s
of shredded cabbage one chopped green
pepper and one cupful of ground car
: rots, mixing well, then add half a cup
ful of lemon juice.
LITTLE BENNY I
BT LEE PAPE.
Me and Puds Simkins was sitting on
my frunt steps Just sitting there, and
I said. Our cook is going to leave to
day, she’s up in her room packing rite
now.
Shall we sneek up and peek In at
her? Fuds said, and I said. No. I got
a better ideer than that, lets go back
in our kitchin and celebrate tty mak-1
mg a fearse noise and everything, and
Nora wont be able to say a werd be
cause she dont belong here any more,:
0 boy tank about revendge
Well how about your mother? Puds
said, and I said, She aint home, she’sJ
downtown.
Wich she was. and me and Puds went
back to the kichtn and nobody wasent '
back there, and I took a frying pan
and a big spoon, making a drum, and
Puds took 2 alluminum pots, making
simbols and we started to march
around making a fearse noise with
them, yelling Here we come, there she
goes, boom diddy boom boom, bang
bang.
Keeping it up for a while till it start
ed to get monotoniss, and I yelled. For
ward charge, over the top.
Frend or foe, Puds yelled. And we
started to pretend we was attacking the
enemy, nocking over the 2 kitchin
chairs and pushing the table all crook
ed and making the most noise yet, and
just then who came in mad with 2 suit
cases and her hat on but Nora, saying, ,
Now wats all this, look at me cleen
kitchin, git out of here before I skin
the 2 of ye alive.
You dont live here any more, youve
left, I said feeling half scared and" half
brave, and Nora said, O its left I have, '
is it? Well 111 just stay here and get the
supper started till your mother comes
home. 111 prove Im still boss in this
kitchin for a little while anyways, and 1
If theres a boy in me site by the time
1 get my coat off let heaven have pity
on him. she said.
Making me feel all a ways scared .
and none brave, and me and Puds quirk i
ran out dropping the pots and things i:
like a small but retreeting army, and : i
Nora started tc get supper reddy for j
ma. i
Proving lots of things get did for spite !1
that would never of got did for good
nature. i
Grated Beets.
Cook five good-sized beets until i
tender, then plunge them in cold water
and remove the skins. When cold ; :
grate them. Then add two tablespoon- ’
nils of vinegar, three-fourths teaspoon- i
ful of salt, one tablespoon ful of sugar,
and let stand. Put one tablespoonfui ]
of lard or bacon fat In a skillet and i
melt slowly. Add one small onicn i
minced very fine and cook in the fat, i
but. do not brown, Then add one table- I
spoonful of flour end blend well. Add
the beets and cook for ab:ut 15 minutes.
The ^ oman Who Makes Good
BY HELEN WOODWARD,
Whose uniquely successful career, both in business and private Ufa,
enables her to speak with authority on problems
of the modern woman.
Insuring Her Friends.
"Dear Miss Woodward: I am a col
lege graduate, 26 years old, but un
a-ained in any practical field. Circum
stances now force me to earn my living.
I have decid'd to
inter the insurance
Business as an
agent, as I have
taken a few courses
In that field while
it college and have
tnany friends on
svhcm I could de
pend as customers.
(Vculd you please
tell me what re
tirements are
lecessary and what
steps I should take
Helen Woodward.
n order to obtain a license to sell in
surance. ANXIOUS.”
The best thing you can do is to get
n touch with a man who already has 1
in insurance agency cf his own, or the
read of the branch office of some big
nsurance company.
If you have good prospects, you would
lave no trouble getting a connection
cith such an office. And these practi- j
•al people would give you any informa
ton you need about licenses (if you1
leed them in your State) and would
fenerally clear the way fcr you.
Getting insurance from your friends
could give you a start, but you couldn't
jase a career on that. You have to be a
rood saleswoman, you have to be a
tuent talker, and you have to have
■normous energy’ to sell insurance.
It is a job that means working from
■he time you wake in the morning
intil 10 o'clock at night. It means
oining clubs; It means endless social
activity. But not for its own sake. You
nust think insurance constantly, no
natter what you do or where you go.
You should have some talent for flg
tres and you should study the business
horoughly before you try to sell policies,
rhe office you join would give you
ill the material you need to study.
Newspaper Work.
"Dear Miss Woodward; I am working
is a stenographer, but am much dis
atisfled. I am interested in newspaper
cork and wonder if you could tell me
tow to go about preparing for this I
cork. I have been graduated from high ,
chocl. but have no college training.
“I could not afford to give up my
iresent position and take a college
■curse. What could I study to fit my
;elf for such a Job as well as continue
ny Job until I could get something along
he line in which I am interested.
"M. E. B.”
There are hundreds of thousands of'
-...— — - - -- -- ’
girls and boys who want to become
newspaper workers. In that enormous
competition you have almost no chance
There are plenty of books you could
read, but they will not help you to get
a jcb.
Since you live in such a small town,
you may have this one chance—tiy to
get a job as a stenographer on your
local paper or on the local paper of
some nearby small town. While thera
you can keep your eyes open and learn
about newspapers. And then you can
work your way to a bigger paper and
finally to a big city newspaper
It is your only possibility. But it Is a
real one Most successful big city news
paper people started on small-town
papers. And stenography is the bat
tool a beginner can have.
Shnmp Gumbo.
Pan-fry two slices of minced bacon
and two small onions minced until
lightly browned, or for about 4 minute*.
Add two cupfuls of halved shrimps, two
cupfuls of tomato pulp, two cupfuls of
diced ckra, two cupfuls of water, half
a teaspoonful of salt, and a pinch of
pepper. Cook slowly until thick and
ropy, or for about 30 minutes It may
be necessary to add more water. Serve
with boiled rice.
A REAL BARGAIN IN
BUS TRANSPORTATION
Special KAn
Week Dec. 6
The Shopper-Theater Weekly Pas* it
good for aii unlimited number of ridet
from Sunday to Saturday at any time
2 A M ®*cspt between 4 and
6,30 P. M. Good all day Saturday
after 9 A. M . with no time restric
tions on Sunday. Transferable to any- A*
one.
WASHINGTON RAPID
UMAX SIT COMPANY
Buy the Pass on the Bus
!
“TJARGAIN” claims mean nothing
iJ to your toaster. Quality counts!
And nothing else. Time after time it
sends cheapened bread on its way.
Time after time it picks the best,
scraps the rest. Never fails! Perfect
bread makes perfect toast. Poor bread
makes po<?r toast.
Let your toaster show what it can
do! Let it protect your table from
4
poor bread! Toast a slice of Wonder
Cut Bread. A slice of any other bread.
For the same length of time. Here is
the result every time: Wonder-Cut
makes the best toast, because it is
the best bread baked. _
MAKERS AL.'J OF HOSTESS CAKE f
Your toaster can’t lie! Take its word
for bread quality! Stick to the bread
it chooses. Put Wonder-Cut Bread
on your shopping list permanently.
At your grocer’s. Oven-fresh, daily.
Best bread baked!
V°NDER-C«/ BREAD
IT'S SLO.BAKED AND SLICED
■ \ ' . *
i '

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