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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 05, 1932, Image 35

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1932-02-05/ed-1/seq-35/

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SHANGHAI BATTLE
New Health Series Will Begin
on WMAL at 10:15
This Evening.
Japan's attack on the native aettle
nient in Shanghai, the reign of terror
»t Nanking and the mobilization of
American and British fighting forces
in Chinese waters will be depicted in
the March of Time dramatization to
night over WMAL and associated Co
lumbia Broadcasting system stations
By way of contrast, scenes at the
opening of the World Disarmament
Conference in Geneva also will be
dramatized.
"Adventures in Health." a new pro
as am sene., featuring Dr. Herman N.
fiundesen. health commissioner of Chi
cago will make its debut at 10:15
o'clock Dr Bundesen will advise par
ents on the care of children. A por
tion of each broadcast will be presented
in dramatic form.
Hit Song« Featured.
The Bath Club program will have
ae its guest Ethel Borden Harrlman,
socially prominent daughter of Mrs. J.
Barden Harriman. 8he will be inter
viewed by Margaret Santry The musi
cal background, to be provided by
Frank ventrees Orchestra, includes
"Bells of fct M ryv and "Some One
to Watch Over Me "
Kit songs from stage and screen suc
cesses will be featured in the pneaht
program. Tuselra Seidel, violin soloist
on this program, will play the spiritual
"Deep Kiver
The Washington Musical Personali
ties program at 10 o'clock will present
Dorothy .Sherman Pierson, soprano.
She will sing "The Pilot,” "Under My
Heart 1 Cared for You" and "I Love
Life "
William O'Neill, who left the plains
of Texas to sing romantic ballads on
Broadway, will be the soloist with Deo
Reisman’s Orchestra in its weekly
broadcast tonight over WRC and other
National Broadcasting Co stations.
His contributions include "Softly as
In a Morning Sunrise." "One Alone"
and "Das Lied 1st Aus.”
Sukoenie to Play.
Sidney Sukoenig. pianist. Walter
Mill?*, baritone, and Ce^are Sodero's.
Orchestra will present the Artists'Serv
ice program at 10 o'clock, a "Mardi I
Gras broadcast will be the Theater cf i
the Air feature.
A portion of the recital of Arthur
Pointer, famous organist at Christ
Church in Alexandria Va. will be
broadcast tonight bv WJ8V. He will
play compositions of Bach. Handel.
Schubert and other famous composers.
The United States Army Band. Wal
ter Holt's Fretted Ensemble and Elmer
Calloway .mu has orchestra will pro
vide WJSV s other outstanding musical
fee lures
In its broadcast tonight over WOL
the Northern Dramatic Co. will pre
sent the second act of "Upward Shot."
a plat by C. M C >acb. A program by
tic Washington Police Post of the
American Legion and a concert by ti c
Maui Islanders are among WOL's other
»'tractions.
Folks Behind
Fhe Microphone
BY THE RADIO EDITOR
WHEN' Alice Joy sings 'Sine
Again That Sweet Refrain' i
o.er the N. B. C network I
Monday night, there will be I
more than a little sentiment
connected with it. She will sing It
especially to: Edward \V. Chadwick,
senior inspector ol ordnance at the
liasl gun factory at the Washington
Na\y Yard.
An admirer of Miss Joy's voice, Mr. |
Chadwick wrote her last November tell
ing her of an old-time song he liked i
and thought suited to her voice. She1
sent him a note at Christmas telling
him that she could not find the sotig.
Shortly afterward she received a
photostatic copy of the song which Mr.
Chadwick had procured from the Li
brary of Congress. The song was placed -
on the program a.s quickly as possible.
Mr Chadwick's comment on the . eng
Is interesting. "It was back in 1895"
h< wrote, "when Primrose and West's j
Minstrels were appearing at ihe old i
Academy of Music in Norfolk. Va that
I first heard this song which has al
ways remained green in my memory
Tlie minstrel troupe was at the height
of its career with such headliners as
George Primrose. George Wilson. Neil
O'Brien and other celebrities.
"An old darky, gray and bent with
age. was seated in the front row with
the stars when a young minstrel stepped
In the footlights and . ang the first verse
of the song. Then the old Negro arose
Irom his scat and tottering most rifee
tively. sang the refrain which I thought
was the most beautiful I had ever
heard. I have never heard it over the
radio and believe, as I told you before,
that you could sing it with as much
effectiveness a.s any one I knew "
* * sfc *
IF statisticians are to be believed, one
network broadcast of a play goes a
long way. By manipulating a few
figures, they say that when the chain
consists of 40 stations, a single produc
tion has an audiencp equivalent to th
attendance for a nine-year run in a
Broadway theater. 'T'hc total is 3.000,
000 listeners
* * * *
AMBITIOUS network broadcasters
have hopes of putting on a series
of programs direct from troubled
China. A tentative d8te for the initial
broadcast still is to be set but the
broadcasters believe the time is not far
cT whet they will have a direct con
nection with the Far East.
* * * * j
THE time now being devoted to the
Woman's Radio Review on N B C
is to be turned into a training
school for embryo radio artists. Start
ing Monday a series of weekly features
will be put on the air in which aspiring
entertainers who have shown real
talent in auditions will go before the
microphone The program on Mondavs
is to b. The Revolving Stage'1 and will
consist of fast-moving dramatie
ekdrhos inteispersed with vocal and
insminunui numbers. Cn Tuesdays
the Pour vvi'l belong to the 'out’!*
«f I.?' • op i" Tv* ronrtnd r j
of : ?;;’s layout lies trt turn fully
COP •> t '.
AROUSE r’EW !'.,TER'"C'TS
Radio lectures on economic subjects
ere having the effect of awakening a
new interest on the part of employes
in industrial concerns in "deep1' sub
jects long considered by many to be
outside the ken of the average worker.
Such is the report that comes from
Levering Tyson, director of the Na
tional Advisory Council on Radio in
Education, which is conducting a series
of Saturday evening broadcasts by
eminent economists and psychologists
over an N B C network.
Demands for thousands of conus of
the lectures have been received from I
workers, r ports Mr. Tvs.'il, who spy's ,
that inquiry has rr.vra'ed thrt many j
industrial concerns are posting the i
programs on their bulletin boards, and j
are having their office libr: iev j ; i ’
the workers with collateral reading mat
tei. Among the companies distributing
the programs to their employes are a 1
large telephone company, a soap manu- I
facturer. a sewing machine company, a
hotel chain, an oil company, a tea
company and a atilt manufacturer.
TARZAN THE TERRIBLE. By EDGAR RICE BURROUGHS
.. . i 1 .. u^ ■" """•|f■ - - L~ ■1 i n o.I
f imi to I«uu am ftucroattu. Inc ah nijf.u rc*er'.fl
ip.'
“The word of a slave against that of a god!" Like
a challenge came the cry. It was the voice of
Ja-dou, a mighty chief among the Hu-done, one
who feared not the high priest, and was his avowed
enemy. Lu-don frowned upon this interruption. “It
is but a step toward the truth," he said. “Possibly
the evidence of the only princess of the house of
Ko-tan will convince tire mighty Ja-don, whose son
fled into exile, refusing the holy offer of the eunuch
priesthood." It was air insulting answer and Ja
don's hand leaped to his knife.
A warrior restrained Ja-don's intention, whispered,
"You are in Jad*ben-Otho's temple," and, thus
cautioned, the great chieftain wa* forced to swallow
Lu-don's affront, though it but increased his hatred
for his powerful enemy. And now Ko-tan turned
toward the high priest. "What knoweth my daugh
ter of this matter?” he questioned, "You would not
bring a princess of my house to testify thus pub
licly? ' "Not in person," replied I-u-don, "but her
hand-maiden shall testify for her." He gave a
signal and an under priest stepped forward, dragging
the reluctant Pan-at-lee.
Then Lu-dan sketched dramatically the scene that
hi* spies had told him concerning Tarzan’s en
trance into the Forbidden Garden. "She says.”
he ended, "that when her maiden saw this creature
suddenly appear, she cried aloud in startled recog
nition—‘Tarzan-jad-guru.’ the same name this slave,
alio from Kor-ul-lul, says their warrior* gave him.
It 1* now plain he is no god—did he tell you he
was a god'* *on?" Lu-don suddenly shot the ques
tion at peer Pan-at-lee. who shrank back, terrified.
"Answer, slave!" thundered the high priest.
"No,” admitted Pan-at-lee in a low voice, casting
an appealing look at Tarzan, who smiled hia en
couragement and friendship to her. "That is no
proof" said Ja-don. “Dost think Jad-ben-Otho
goeth about crying 'I ant god’? Hast ever heard
him, Lu-don?" "Enough,” cried the high priest.
"The evidence is clear; the creature is an impostor
...I. high priest of A-lur, condemn him to die!"
Lu-don paused for the dramatic effect of hia climax.
"If I am wrong." he shouted: "may Jad-ben-Otho
pierce my heart with lightning.” With upturned
face and arms outstretched, he stood as though
awaiting the god’s answer.
POST OFFICE BIS
K! LOTTERIES
Fraud Orders Issued Against
Stations in Mexico
and Cuba.
BY ROBERT MACK.
Fraud orders against a high-power
broadcasting station in Mexico and an
other in Cuba which have been sat
urating areas of the United States with
radio advertisements of illegal lottery
sweepstakes have been issued by the
Post Office Department.
Eh race J. Donnelly, solicitor of the
Post Office Department, disclosed to
day that, in accord with the require
ments of the postal laws, the depart
ment has branded these lottery broad
casts illegal and is refusing delivery of
mail to the enterprises.
Cited as “Outlaw.”
The first fraud aider is against Sta
tion XED. at Beynosa. Mex.. just
across the border from McAllen, Tex. It
Co., and on Tuesday a second order
the stations cited as an "outlaw.” It is
causing interference with certain Amer
ican and Canadian stations.
In the Cuban case tire action is
against the group advertising the lottery
over the station rather than the station
Itself The station is CMK. at Havana,
of 3,110 watts. The largest station on
the island, it is being operated by the
Plaza Hotel and makes Us announce
ment both in English and Spanish.
Like tile Mexican station, it is received
with good signal strength over a wide
sweep of the United States.
Mail Returned.
Mr Donnelly explained that tie fraud
orders were issued because of "adver
tising over the air to people of this
eountrv soliciting money for lottery
tickets.” He said the department has
full authority to ban such practices
by refusing delivery of mail to the en
terprise1. and also refusing to certify
money orders consigned to them. Such
mail is stamped by the department as
"fraudulent,'1 with the additional nota
tion that mail to the particular address
is "returned bv order of the Postmaster
General."
In the Cuban incident postal inspec
tors found that the lottery was being
conducted over Station CMK by an or
ganization styling itself the "National
Brokerage Co” A fraud order was
issued and mail destined for that com
pany immediately stopped. The enter
prise. however, subsequently changed
its name to the "Havana Brokerage
Co..” and on Tusday a second order
went out citing that company.
Mr. Donnelly said there have never
been causes of action against domestic
stations for such practices and the
cases involving XED and CMK are the
oniy radio citations of record. While
no definite information is available, it
is believed in informed radio circles
that both the Mexican and Cuban sta
tions are backed by American capital.
iCopyrulit. 1932 1
FLYER TO RUN HACK
SEATTLE. February 5 -TV-Bob
Wark. an air pilot, planked down a $5
fee here today and asked for a hack
driver's license.
"Business in my line has been slack ”
he explained. "It occurred to me a
hack might mak ■ money
There'll be a high seal up flw for
the driver, he sa'id. and a seat behind
.or two passengers.
Today on the Radio
(Alt programs scheduled /or Eastern Standard Time.)
Will' 315-8 Meter*.
" l\*-. .,50 Kilocyi'le*.
3 Oft—Woman's Radi.* Bcvitv.
4 00—"Decorating Notes," by Betty
Moore.
4 15- "Milestones," by the Radio
Guild
5:15—"Skippy."
5 30—Correct time,
5:31—Novelty Orchestra and Dolly
Connelly.
5 45—Russ Columbo's Orchestra.
8 00—Automotive Trade Association
program.
6 15—Ai Ramons’ Orchestra.
8:45—The (Stebbins Boys.
v 00—Amos ’n’ Andy
7:15—Lanin’s Orchestra.
7:30—Alice Joy and Raul Van Loan's
Orchestra.
7:46—Radiotone Qu. t . I
8 00—Service hour, with Bourdon Or
chestra and Caralurs' Quartet,
9:00—Eskimo club
9:30—Leo Reismai.'s Orchestra.
10:00—Artists' Service Hour.
10:30—Theater of th*' Air.
I 11:00—Last-minute N w •
11:02—Emory Duusheny s Orchestra.
11:30—Weather forecast
11:31—Jack Dennys Orchestra.
12:00— Jack Kirbery. b.irito:.
12:05?- Coon-Sar.d Orchestra.
12:30 to 1 00?. Waldorf Astoria Dance
Orchettra
Early Program Tomorrow.
6:45a—Tower Health Exercises.
8:00a—Gene and Glenn
8:15a—Morning Devotions.
8:30a—Cheerio.
I 9:00a—Ballad Singers
9:15a—Sparkling music
| 9:30a—Tom Waring's Song Recital.
: 9:46a—F ed program
j 10:00a—Mrs. Blake’s Radio Column.
10.15a—Breen and De R „se
10:30a—Hawaiian Serenade™.
10:45a—Two Seats in the Balcony.
1 11:15a—Radio Household Institute.
11:30a—Keys of Happiness.
12:00m—Black and Gold Orchestra.
12 15—"The Real George Washington."
bv Charles Colfa:; Long.
12:30—National Farm and II me Hour.
1:30—Palais d Or Orchestra.
2:00—National Republican Club Sat
urday Discussion
2:45—“Simon Boccaneera," from the
stage of Metropolitan Opera Co.
w r\l 228.9 Meters.
" 1,310 Kilocycles.
3:00—Variety hour.
4:00—Tea Time Tunes.
4:30—Festival of Music.
4 45—Theater Miniatures.
5:00—Paul Gabie. organist.
5:30—The Clothes Men.
5 45—The Dream Gir'..
6:00—Sportorial. bv B* van Morse
6:15—Program bv the W; - ington Po
lice Post of the American
Legion.
6:45—Varieties.
7:00—Dinner Music.
7:20—News flashes. I
7 30—Northern Dramatic Co.
8:00— Maui I-landers.
8 15—Black-Outs.
8 30 to 9:00—The Community Chest
Girl and Her Guests.
Earlv Program Tomorrow.
7:00a—Musical Clock.
8:00a—Chimes and Birthdays.
8:05a—Musical Clock (continued).
9:55a—Police Bulletins.
10:00a—Edith Reed's Kiddies.
11:00a—Red Cros. program.
11:15a—Walter Rccd program.
11:45a—Program by the Tuberculosis
Association
12:00m—Road conditions in Virginia.
12:05—Luncheon Music.
12:15—A! :n Tit-am. entertainer.
12:30 to 1:00—Dance Music.
\YM U 4*5-9
' 1 630 Kilocycle*.
•1 00—United State* Marine Band.
3 45—Educational feature.
4:00—Light Opera Gems.
4 30 "Tiie Stage and Screen," by An
drew R Kelly.
4 4a—Curtis Institute of Music.
5:30—Herr Louie and the Hungry Five.
5:45—Flashes from The Evening Star,
by Doug Warrenfels.
fi 00—Time and program resume.
6:01—John Kelvin, tenor.
6:15—Automotive Trade Association
program
6 30—Golden Trail of Melody.
6 45—Jimmy and Jane.
7 00—Myrt and Marge
7 T5—Bing Crosby, baritone.
7 30—Southern Orchestra.
7 45—Morton Downey, tenor.
8:00—The Bath Club.
8.15—"SingilV Sam.”
8:30—March of Time.
9 00—The Pageant.
9:30—Leon Belasco* Orchestra
9:45—"Aviation New*." by Casey
Jones
1C :00— Dorothy Sherman Pierson, so- 1
prano, and Henry Schmidt j
Gregor, pianist.
10 15- Adventures in Health." featur-,
tng Dr Herman N Bundeson,
president of the Chicago Board
of Health
10:30—Nat Shilkret's Orchestra.
10 45—Vivian Ruth and Freddie Rich's
Orchestra.
11 00—Wardman Park Orchestra.
11:30—George Olsen's Orchestra.
13:00—Weather report.
13 01 Ben Bernie's Orchestra.
12:30 to 1,00a—Kruger's Orchestra.
Early Program Tomorrow.
8 00a—Salon Music.
8 30a--Morning Devotion*.
8:45?.—Vocal Art Trio.
9:00a—The Commuter*.
9:30a—Olympic Skating Race.
10:00a—United States Army Band. j
10:30a—Adventures of Helen and Mary !
11:00a—New York Philharmonic Sym
phony Society Concert.
12 30—Radio Guide.
12 35—Charles Boulanger’s Orchestra.
1 00—George Hall s Orchestra.
1:30—Rltz-Carltnn Orchestra,
3 no—Olympic DogslegKR*e».
2 30—Democratic Club TTO-utn.
3 00—The Four Clubmen.
IC V 205-4 Meters.
j^go Kiiocvcles.
3.00—United States Marine Band.
4 00—Walter Doe, entertainer.
4 30—Wilhelmina Andrews, pl&nist.
4 45—Studio feature.
5 00—Graffer Gray.
5:10—Joe and Henry.
5:30—Naval Hospital program
6:00—The Adventure Club,
fi. 20—News Flashes,
t 30—Mariorie Webster.
7 00—Market RetJort.
7:15—Sunday School Reporter.
7:30—United States Army Band.
8 no—Shoreham Concert Orchestra.
8 30—Minstrel Memories.
9:00—Organ recital by Arthur Poister. :
broadcast from Christ Church. '
in Alexandria. Va.
9-30—Halt's Fretted Ensemble.
10:00—News flashes.
10:15—'The Saving Parson,” by Rev.
Glen B. Faucett.
11:00- Studio feature.
11:30 to 12:00—Calloway's Orchestra.
Early Program Tomorrow.
8 00a—The Breakfast Club.
9:00a—The Treasure Chest.
9:30a—For Your Information.
10 00a—Peggy Clarke.
Do this for
Your Child in
TWO WEEKS
How to rid any boy or girl of
sluggishness or constipation and
build a big appetite.
The trouble with children who will not
eat is usually stasis. The symptoms are
a tongue that’s always c,oated, bad
breath, poor color, dull eyes that are
often a bilious yellow. No appetite, no
ambition—even for play. Hard to get
to sleep, hard to wake in the morning.
There’s an absolute remedy for this
condition. It gives listless youngsters the
appetite and energies of a young animal!
They eat! They gain! They keep well!
The California Tre'iirr.cnt
conquers Sluggishness
It’s not the stomach, but the bowel
condition that keeps children from eat
ing. But the trouble is in the lower bowel
—the colon. California fig syrup is the
only “medicine” needed to stimulate the
colon muscles. The very next day, your
child is eating better and feeling better.
Keep on with the fig syrup a few days
and you will see amazing improvement
in appetite, color, weight and spirits.
Any drugstore has the real California
fig syrup, all bottled, with directions.
Nature never made a nicer acting or
nicer tasting laxative. (It is purely
vegetable,) R mei . r California fig
syrup • c'.P' s, a' dd or any upset
has eloggeu a child's bowels.
WARNING
Even when it's something to give children,
some stores will try to substv '>e.
So be sure the bottle '
CALIFORNIA Fig Syrup.
10:4&a—Sacred Hour.
11:10a—Oeapel Choir.
11:30a—Luneheon Muaic.
13 00m—Salon MuMe
1:00—Schramm’s Trio.
1:30—Modern Melodic*.
2:00—Shoreham Orchestra
T\r A A 431.5 Meters.
690 Kilocycles.
7:45 to 8:00—Public Health Service
Broadcast. No. 403 — "Public
Health Nursing.”
9'55—Time signals.
10:00—Weather report
Major Radio Feature!
SPEECHES.
"Adventures in Health,” by Dr Herman
N. Bundeson, WMAL, 10:15.
DRAMA.
Norlhem Dramatic Co WOL. 7:30;
March of Tune, WMAL, 8:30.
VARIETY.
Bing Crosby, WMAL. 7:15; Alice Joy
and Van Loan’s Orchestra WRC,
7:30; Morton Downey, WMAL, 7:4o
Service Hour. WRC, 8 00; The Bath
Club. WMAL. 8:00; organ recital by
Arthur Poister. WJSV. 9 00; Eskimo
Club WRC. 9:00; Leo Reiaman's Or
chestra. WRC 9 30 Theater of the
Air. WRC, 10:30; Vivian Ruth and
Rich's Orchestra. WMAL, 10:45.
DANCE MUSIC.
George Olsen’s Orchestra. WMAL,
1130: Ben Benue's Orchestra,
WMAL, 12:01a: Coon-Sanders Or
chestra, WRC, 12 05a.
HIGH LIGHTS*ELSEWHERE
6:00—Raising Junior, domestic skit—
WJZ, WBAL, WHAM. KYW and
WTMJ.
6:30—The Vagabonds: "Hack” Wilson
and Billy Artzt's Orchestra—
WJZ, WBAL, WHAM, W'LW and
WMAQ
7:45—Elsie Janis and Harrv Salty's
Orchestra—WJZ. WBZ WEAL,
WKVA, KDKA and WHAM
8:00—Victor Moore, stage star, and
Leonard Joy's Orchestra—WJZ,
WBZA, WHAM, WREN, WBAL
and WLW
8:30—Billy Hlllpot and "Scrappy”
Lambert—WJZ, WBAL, WHAM,
WBZ ar.d WJR
9 00—Friendship Town, dramatic
sketch, and music — WJZ,
WHAM KDKA, WREN. WBAL,
WBZ. WHAS and WJAX
9 30—Roy Shield's Orchestra and Irvin
S Cobb—WJZ. WHAM. WMC,
KDKA, WBAL, WJAX and
WREN.
10:00—Paul Whiteman and His Orches
tra—WJZ, KDKA. WBZ. WSM.
WBAL, WH'AM and WJR
10:30—Clara, Lu and Em. humorous
sketch—WJZ. WHAM WBAL.
KDKA, WLW and WREN
10:45—Waves of Melody: Victor Arden's
Orchestra—WJZ. WBZ, WBAL,
WHAM and WJR.
11:00—Slumber Music: Ludwig Lau
rier's String Ensemble—WJZ,
WBAL and WBZ
12:15—William atoess and his orches-i
tra, dance music—WJZ. WLW.
WGAR. WENR and WREN.
_
'anytime SB
anyouhere. ’■
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Opai* Evening*
SEEKS TO ENJOIN
HURLEY AND BROWN
Miami Beach Jockey Club Files
Plea to Prevent U. S. Action
Against Reclamation Project.
The Miami Beach Jockey Club yes
terday filed suit in the District of
Columbia Supreme Court for an
injunction against Patrick J. Hurley,
Secretary of War. and Lytle Brown,
chief of Engineers, U. 8 A , to
prevent Government interference with
the work of the club to reclaim and fill
in an island at Hiscayne Bay, Miami
Beach, Fla. The proposed interference,
the court is advised, is without author
ity of law and will prevent the club
from expending $2,000,000 and relieving
unemployment to that extent.
Through Attorney Wilton J. Lambert
and Rudolph Yeatman. the claim is
made that there is no merit in the con
tention of the War Department tnat the
filling in of the island would interfere
with navigation, as the adjacent waters
have never been used except oy small
: pleasure craft and by barges of shallow
drait in purely local transfers and that
| owners of similar submerged islands
have universally been allowed to fill
them The War Department, it is
claimed exhausted its rights in the
matter last June when the Secretary
ruled that the island did not and would
not interfere seriously with navigation
and he is now powerless to review that
decision. Irreparable loss will occur to
the plaintiff, it is asserted, unless the
court ties the hands of the department
and prevents its interference.
BEGGAR BITES EAR
Victim Attacked When He Refuses
to Give Money.
NIAGARA FAI.LS. N Y.—When
George Bratehe'.l appeared at a doctor’s
office with part of his ear missing, police
investigated.
A panhandler.'' said Rratchell. ‘‘ap
proached me and said he was hungrv
and needed a dime. I refused. He bit
my ear.'’
PLANS TO BREAK NOSES
Chicagoan, Fined $25 for Assault,
Considers Sum Bargain.
After paying a fine of $25 for break
ing George Foster's nose. Patrick Mc
Gurn of Chicago said that at that
price he was "going to get square with
two other troublesome neighbors."
You can do anything with money.
ir/\ in.
in a\ id iko
(fewuim
hrtiiDiE^
UX 201 A
UX I 71 A
UX 226
UX 2 27
UX 2 80
I FREE 1
Brine in your old lubes
and we will test them
with the most modern
equipment in the city.
STAIR
IRAYDII'O
4.00-11St.N.W
i 1350-F Jt.N.W
j52!8-l4»jrt.N.W
Ill 1 —1-H
NEW POLICY
We Will
REPAIR
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III* -<- III ii 1
PLANE NEARS 'SLAVIK
IN HUNT FOR TRAPPER
Demented Sla-yer of -Mounted Po
liceman Expected to Be At
tacked by Posee.
By the Associated Press.
EDMONTON, Alberta, February 5.—
Capt. W. R. Wop’ May, prominent flyer,
who is racing north to aid a Royal
Northwest Mounted Police posse in the
capture of Albert Johnson, a demented
trapper encamped near Aklavik, North
western Territory, reached Fort Simp
son. Northwestern Territory, yesterday,
a message received here said. He was
expected to reach Aklavik. 1,700 miles
north of here, by Saturday.
The trapper has slain one constable
of the "mounted" and wounded another.
Bombs are to be dropped on his strong
hold from the plane.
WRC Unable to Take Series.
Unable to take the “America at
Work" radio series, an N. B C “blue"
network weekly feature, WRC an
nounced today that this program can
be h, aid regularly every' Saturday after
noo 1 from 5:15 to 5:45 over WJZ,
WCAL and KDKA
_
I We teat any radio brought I
to our service department 1
DVENTURES
IN HEALTH
By America's Famous Health Officer
DR. HERMAN N. BUNDESEN
Preside!*, Chicogo Board of HeaWh
WMAL—10:15 p.m.
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