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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 13, 1932, Image 15

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1932-02-13/ed-1/seq-15/

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CURB SHARES RISE
IN HEAVY MARKET
Gains of Fractions to Six
Points Scored in Strong
Market.
BY JOHN A. CRONE.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
NEW YORK, February 13.—A brisk
opening on the Curb Exchange today,
which was featured by gains ranging
from fractions to six points, was main
tained throughout the session.
Market leaders like Electric Bond
Share, Middle West Utilities, United
Light & Power A, and Cities Service
moved up fractionally as Nation-wide
investment buying orders and short
covering orders were received in in
creasing amounts.
Foreign shares, chiefly British and
Canadian, featured early dealings. They
were replaced by pipe line stocks, which
in turn were overshadowed by the
movements in motors. While the latter
were moving forward the oils started
upward and were trailed by the aviation
Issues. Then buying became more gen
eral ji public utilities and spread to
metals, specialties and investment
trusts.
Approval of American steps taken to
end the world-wide depression was
mirrored in London Friday and was re
flected in opening quotations there to
day. Advances were scored at the open
ing here in such overseas Issues as
Brazilian Traction. Woolworth. Ltd.,
and Ford Motor, Ltd. The Ford stock
was aided by the announcement of the
new Ford models and the recall of
workers to plants making parts for Ford.
These developments mole than offset
the omission of Ford Motor of Ger
many's dividend.
Crude oil pipe line deliveries by 10
rompanies formerly in the Standard
Oil group totaled 9.894.236 barrels in
January, against 10.656.207 in Decem
ber, but these statistics were set against
some favorable earning reports of indi
vidual oil carriers. National Transit
opened up fractionally in response to its
1931 income statement showing earn
ings of $1.16 a share, against $1.20 In
1930. which was better than anticipated.
Eureka Pipe Line reported $4 23 a share,
against 34 cents in 1930. Net profit of
Southwest Pennsylvania Pipe in 1931
tras $155,498. against $113,684 in 1930.
On the heels of the move in pipe
lines came an advance in the oils which
lifted Gulf Oil up 2 points.
Cord Corporation moved up more
than a half point in sympathy with
to* rise of Auburn Auto. Meanwhile
Pnrfi Motor of Canada A and B shares
rose about a half point and Durart
Motors showed signs of activity.
Aviation issues such as E. W Bliss.
General Aviation and Transcontinental
Air Transport were up slightly. Metals
moved forward with Aluminum Co of
America in the lead. Active silver
dealings lifted Bunker Hill-Sullivan a
shade. Coppers displayed increased de
mand at higher quotations, despite the
fact that the red metal was not on the
proposed British free list.
BONDS ON THE CURB
MARKET.
Bales DOMESTIC BONDS
In thousands High Low. Close.
5 Alabama Pw 4'jR 'S7 78’# 75 76’»
18 Aluminum Co 5s '52 93'2 93 93
1 Aluminum Ltd 5s 48 66 66 66
3 Am Cmslh Pw 6s '40 3’* 3‘, 3
11 Amer El Pow 6s A 57 30 29‘2 29'2
8 Amer C. A E 5s 2028 81'.- 80'z 81 j
2 Amer G A' Pow 5s 53 27'4 27'« 27’,
40 Am P * L fa 2016 74 7J»2 74
1 Ampr Rad 4'jS 47 821 a 82’2 82 ^
3 Am*»r Roll M 4>2s '33 M 63 64
12 Amer Roll Mill 5s 48 51 50 51
5 App*lach Gas 6s 48 15'a 15 15‘a
6 Appalac Gas 6s B 45 12 12 1*
20 Appalach Pow 5s '55 82 81'2 82
20 Arkans PAL 5s 56 80 79s. 80
15 Asso El Ind 4'2s '53 55'2 53>2 55>z
12 Asso GftE 4'2s ’48 40'z 35 4011
120 ASSO GftE 4'2s 49 C 39'2 34 38
31 Asso Gas A El 5s '50 41 36s, 41
59 Asso Gas ft El 5a '68 39 34‘a 39
52 As GftE 5>as 38 in cl 38'2 35 381 z
5 Asso GftE 5'2s '77 42 39’ z 42
6 Asso TiTS'ilA '55 70 66'i 70
16 As Tel UtU *>2S '44 C 44 42 43'a
1 Baldwin Loco 5'2s *3.3 90 90 90
2 Bell Tel Can 5s A '55 88’a 88's 88'a
3 Bell Tel Can 5s B '57 88 87’, 88
1 Bost A Me 6s m '33 92' z 92' z 92' z
3 Boston Con G 5s 47 94'z 94'z 94'a
2 BufI Gen El 5s A '56 100 100 100
3 Cap Adm 5s '53 xw 70 70 70
16 Carolina P ft L 5s *56 75 74-, 75’z
10 Caterpillar Tr 5s '35 90 90 90
2Cen 111 P 8 4'jS F '67 69'a 68’, 88’,
11 Cent Pow ft Lt 5s '56 69'a 69', 69^,
35 Cen Pub Ser 5>a* '49 21 20 20 a
13 Cent Stat Elec 5s '48 35 34', 35
. SCent St Elec 5'2s '54 37 35 37
6 Cent St PAL 5'2S 53 58 56 58
2 Chi Dts El 4>2s 70 A 72 ‘ a 72 ' z 72' z
SChl Ry cod 5s 2027. 47 46 4i
S23 Cities Service 5s 50. 47'2 44', 47 z
16 Cities Service 5s '66 44 42 44
10 Cit Serv Gas 5'zs 42 53’4 52', 53’4
10 Cit Serv Gas P 6s 43 62 60 62
18 Cit Serv Pw 5'2s '52 54’, 52’s 54 ;,
1 Cleve Elec Ulu 5s '39 100’* 100’, 100’,
34 Comwlh Ed 4',s '60 82’. 81', 82',
23 Comw h Ed 4',s D '57 82’, 81’, 82’,
27 Comwh Edis 4s F 81 77', 76‘s 77’,
5 Com nity PAL 5s '57 60', 60', 60'2
3 Con Gas Balto 4s '81 S4'4i 84’, 84».
4 Cons G Ut 6'zS A 43 17 16', 17
7 Con Gas Ut 6s A 43 28 27’, 28
4 Consum Pow 4’2s '58 88', 88 88
12 Cont GftE 5s A '58 61'z 58 60’,
2 Contmen Oil 5',s '37 78 78 78
7 Crane Co 5s 40 . . . 80 80 80
7 Dix CrG 6',s A 37 ww 70', 69 69
10 East Ut Inv 5s A '54 30 28'2 30
12 Edis El Boston 5s 33 100', 100', 100',
40 Elec P ft L 5s A 2030 551 z 54'a 55'Z
1 Empire Dist El 5s 52 62’, 62’, 62’,
5 Empire OAR 5'zs 42 44'z 44 44 2
9 Federal Wat 5'2S '54. 33’* 32’, 33’,
2 Firestone C M 5s '48. 70 69'2 70
6 Firestone Tire Ss '42. 71 71 <1
4 Fisk Rubber 5'jf 31 . 17 17 17
9 Fisk Rub 5'2s 31 cod. 13’, 13', 13’,
13 Florida P ft L 5s 54. 76 74’, '6
49 Gatineau Pow 5s 56. 67', 66'z 61
1 Gatineau Pow 6s '41. 58’, 58’, 58’,
2 Gatineau Pw 6s B 41 58’z 58 z 58 z
3 Gen Bronze 6s '40, .. .30', 3(U, 30',
5 Gen Mot Acc 5s '32.. 99’, 99’, 99,
1 Gen Pub Serv 5s '53 68 ’ a 68', 68 a
16 Gen Pb Ut 6',s A '56 30 29 , 30
2 Gen Wa Wks Ss B _44 17’. IS', 17',
15 Gillette S Ra? 5s '4(1. 86 8M< 86
11 Gulf Oil P« 5s 37 95 94 95
8 Hood Rubber .V2s 36 37'j 36 37 2
4 Hou*t Gulf G 6s A 43 4? 39 42
1 Hvgrade Fd 6s A 49 43 4.1 43
St HI Pew A LI 6s A '53 87 84 85 *
Bill Pow A- Lt Ss C SS .s'* .4 .5 2
18 Illinois P A- L 5'.,J 57 86 62 a 6S
4 Tllln P A- L S' iS B 64 tl , .9’ . •
71 Insull unfit 56s b :4n 28'* 2sjl 2’s«
SIntPwSerfMC 7 w>, w,
I Intfr P*' Sff 7s E 57 76 '* <6
1 Int Pow See 7s F 52 64 64 64
11 Inrerr Ser Am .55 47 49 48 48
7 Imersta Power 5s 57 64*+ 64'* 64*
13 >rs C PA:I, 4'^s C 61 81 1 a * ** 2
1 Jer Cen PM. 5s R 47 90 90 90
2 Kimberly Cla 5s A 43 84'a 84 2 2
1 KOPPfrS G A C 5* 47 '2" <2 n *2 »
6 Knpper G6C 5':s'50 JJ3, 76 76 4
SK51rhI»Sn?5«?“« g 90 90
5 La P * L 5s 57 .... 85 83’, 85
5 Manitoba Pw 5'as 51 48 a 4. a 48 a
18 Massacl)'! Gas 5s 55 82N 82 82 ,
2 Mass Gas 5'aS .44. 9L , 91 a 91 ,
10 Mid West Ut 5s 32 cv 81'a "0 8
13 Mid West Ut 5s 33 cv 52 50>* 51 a
1 Mid West Ut 5s 34 cv 45 45 45
43 Mid West, Ut 5s 35 cv 43'a 42 43 ,
2 Miss Pew A Lt 5s.n7 .5 .5 .*
3 Miss River FI xw 44 80 80 80
4 Miss River Pw Ss 51 91 91 91
5 Mont L HAP Ss A 51 83’, 83 4 83 ,
15 Na rracansrt t 5s 5... 94 93 .4
18 Nat Electric 5’aS .A. 31, 29' , 31,
1 Nat P A L 6s A 2026. (3 . 73 4 73 «
5 Nat PAL 5s B 2030 67’, 65 66 a
20 Nat P S 5 s 78. ... 34’ a 32 « 34 a
2 Nevada Calif 5s 56.. 72’, 72 , 72 «
7 New Ena GAE 5s 47. 61 , 60 , 60 «
II New Eng GAE 5s 47 . 60 a 59s, 60 a
8 New Ena GAE 5s 50. 61', 60 61 ,
35 New Ena Pow 5s '48 61 59," 60 a
42 New Enc Pw 5'as 54 64'a 63, M
42 N V P A L 41 as 67 86 84’, 85 a
2 Nias Falls Pow 6s '50 102’, 102’, 102 ,
1 No Con Ut 5'as A '48 38 38 38
4 No Ohio PAL 5' aS '51 89 a 88', 89 a
6 No Ohio T A L 5s d6 82 a 81s, 81 ,
3 No Stat Pow 5’ s 40 83', 82’" 83 ,
34 Nor Stat Pow 4'a« 61 84 83 . 84
3 Ohio Edison 5s 60... 89 88 , 89
52 Ohio Pow 4’aS D 56. 82’, 80 , 8. ,
4 Ohio Pow 5s B 52. .. 92 92 92
1 Okla Gas A El 5s 50 82 82 82
16 Pacific GAE 41 as '57 85’, 85’, 85 4
4 Pac G A El B 6s '41 102 102 102
8 Pacific GAE 5s C '52 98', 97’. 98 ,
2 Pac Inve 5s A 48 xw 61 60'a 61
18 Pacific Pw A L 5s .55 78Ja TV* 78a
1 Pac Wes Oil 6 as 43. 55’, 55’, 55’,
5 Pa Cen PAL 4'as 77. i4 73', 73>2
1 Penn Elec 4s 71 F . 68 88 68
1 Penn O Ed 5'as B 59 '2 72 72
1FI Ohio PAL S'2s 54 92 92 92
lPhila Elec 5'as '72 101 101 101
8 Pledmo E! 6'aS A 60 59’, 56 59’,
10 P S No 111 4'aS F 81 76’, 76', .5’,
f 24 Pb S N 111 41 as E 80 77 76’, 76’,
7 Pub S PAL 5'aS A '49 74’, 73 74’.
7 PUI S PAL 4',s 50 D 70 67’, 87’,
3 Repub Gas 6s '45 A 14'a 14 14
6 Remington 5'2s A '33 78 77 77
13 Rooh Ch Pw 5.s A '53 33'i 32'h 33
1 Sate H Wat 4>.s '79 89s, 89s, 89s,
1 St L C.as A C 6s '47. 18'a 18'a 18'a
2 San Ant P S 5s B 58 73 73 73
1 Schulte RE 6s '35 xw 42 42 42
3 Shaw WAP 4'2S A 67 74 74 74
10 Shaw WAP 4'aS D '70 73 72’, 72’,
35 Shaw WAP 5s C '70. 83', 82', 82',
32 SE PAL 6s A 2025 xw 74s, 73s, 74s.
13 South Calif Ed 5s '51 94’, 94s, 94’.
7 South Calif Ed 5s 52 94 94 94
ISou Calif Edis 5s 54 S3 93 93
1 South Cal Cat 5a ’17 85’. 85’, 85%
NEW YORK CURB EXCHANGE
Eeeeired by Prhreto Wire Direct to The Star OiBcc. _
Stock* sold In lW-ihira lots nent ikm taliuM by letter “I."
^Trev. 1931.-. Stock and Bales—
Hlrh Low. Dividend Rate. Add 00. Open. Hlsh. Low. Close
4* 114 Aero Supply B. 2 2* 2* 2* 2*
6V. 8* Allied Ullls Inc. 1 4 4 4 4
224 48 Aluminum Co of Am 1625s 64 56* 54 56*
16* 9* Alum Goods (1.20).. 1 10* 10* 10* 10*
102 12* Aluminum Co Ltd... 1 16 16 16 16
109* 56* Alu Co of Am pf (I). 2 60 60 60 60
1* * Am Austin Car. 2 * * * *
10 1* Am CltFwA Lt B... 6 2 2 2 2
1 * Am Com Pow A. 1 * * * *
29* * Am Com Pow B. 1 * * * *
II* 2* Am Cyanamld B.... 6 S* S* 3* 8*
7* 1* Am Equities. 1 2* 2* 2* 2*
II* I* Am Tor Pow war.... 31 4 4* 4 4*
6* * Am Poundoro. 82 * 1* * 1*
97* 12 Am Gas A Eleo (tl>. 63 34* 16* 34* 36*
52 21 Am Hardware (4)... 1 22* 22* 22* 22*
7* 1* Am Invest Inc iB).. 1 3* 3* 3* 3*
14* 17* Am Lt ATrac (2*). 13 19* 21 19* 21
28 6* AmMfgCo. 1 8 8 8 8
50 40* Am Mfg Co pf (5)... 26s 42* 42* 42* 42*
28 6 Am Salamandra. 1 5 6 6 6
19* I Am Superpower. 66 4 4* 4 4*
t * Am Util A Gn B Ttc. 6 A A A A
6 * Am Yvette Co.. Inc... 1 * * * *
•* * Appalachian Gee.... 30 A * A A
I* 1* Arkans Nat Gas A... 85 2* 2* 2* 2*
Assoc Gas* El Ltd.. 1 6 6 6 6
It* I* AsaoGABl (A) bS%. 22 4* 4* 4* 4*
24* 10 Asso GAE all ct I SO. 4 9* 10* 9* 10*
91* 88 Asso G A El ct (8)... 25s 89* 39* 39* 89*
4 * Asso Rayon. 1 1* 1* 1* 1*
8H I’k Atlas Util Corp. 68 fi* fi'y 5* fi'k
2* 1* Atlas Utilities war.. 1 1* 1* 1* 1*
Atlas Util pf (3).... 1 33* S3* 33* 33*
18* 9* Bickford's (1.20).... • 1 9* 9* 9* 9*
16* 2 Bliss Co(EW)«b»%) 2 4 4 4 4
6* 1 Blue Ridge Corp. 6 1* 1* 1* 1*
18* lt* Blue Ridgect pf(al) 7 19* 21* 19* 21*
104 100 Bohack (HC)lst pf 7 50s 86 86 86 86
28* 7 Brasil Tree LtAP(l) 64 11* 11* 11* 11*
2* * Bril Celanese rets... 3 1* 1* 1* 1*
2* * Brldgept Mch (25c). 3 1* 1* 1* 1*
6 * Brill Corp A. 2 1* 1* 1* 1*
105 75 Buff N A E P 1st (5). 2 79 80 79 80
63 20* Bunker Hill A Bull.. 25s 24 24 24 24
7 1* Butler Bros. 1 2* 2* 2* 2*
2* * Cable Radio T Ttc... 1 * * * *
4* * Canadian Marconi... 18 1 1 1 1
16* 12 Carman & Co A (2).. 1 13 13 IS 13
19* 1* Cent Pub Svc A b5%. 26 1* 2 1* 2
12* 1* Central States Elec.. 12 1* 2* 1* 2*
108 45 Childs Co pf. 40s 17 17 17 17
20* 5 Cities Service (glOe) 150 6 6* 6 6*
84* 3t* Cities Serv pf (•)... 6 49* 61 49* 61
10* 2* Cleveland Tractor... 1 3* 3* 3* 8*
8* V. Colon Oil. 2 * * * *
Colum GAE ct pf (5) 60s 78 80 78 80
7* 1 Col OtlA Gas vtc_ 1 1* 1* 1* 1*
250* 109 Cemmwltb Bdlson (0 600(106* 110* 106* 110*
2* * Cmwlth A Sou war.. 40 A A * A
* * Comstock Tunnel... 1 i 4 i 4
I* * Consol Copper. 2 1 1 1 1
101 17* Con Gas Balto (3.10) t 60* 61* 60 61*
10* 1* Conti Chicago Corp.. 1 2 2 2 2
64* 1* Cont Shares ct pf... 100s 2* 2* 2* 2*
lt 4* Cord Corp. 44 6* 6* 6* 6*
22 1* Corp Sec Ch (b*%).. 2 1* 1* 1* 1*
3* * Cosden Oil. 1 * * * »»
14* 2* Crocker Wheeler.... 4 4 4* 4 4*
1* A Cusl Mex Mining.... 3 A A A A
2* A Dayton Air A Eng... 5 A A A A
44* 8* Deere A Co. 18 9* 10* 9* 10*
8* 1 De Forest Radio.... 33 1 1* 1 1
132 69 Dixon (Joseph) (4). 10s 62 62 62 62
6 1* Dublller Cond A Rad 6 1111
3* * Durant Motora. 18 * * * *
24 2 East St* Pow <B)... 9 24 34 24 34
84 3 East Util Assoc cv.. 2 34 34 34 34
84 14 Elslar Electric. 1 2 2 2 2
81 84 Elec BondASn (b8%) 346 114 124 114 124
1084 48 Elec B* Sh pf (*)... 2 674 *74 574 574
224 6 Elec Pow Assoc (1). 1 84 84 84 84
224 84 Elec Pow Asioc A (1) 1 84 84 84 84
*74 34 Elec P A Lt op war.. 12 44 44 44 44
18 34 El SharehoIdgtb6%) 4 4 4 4 4
884 354 Elec Sharhldg pf(aS) 1 46 45 45 45
794 894 Emp G A F cu pf(7). 100* 45 45 45 45
74 4 Empire Pub Svc (A). 14 4 4 4
IS 24 Europ El Ltd A (30c) 1 24 24 24 24
4 4 Europ Elec deb rts.. 1 4 4 4 4
294 84 Ford Motor. Can., A. 31 124 134 124 134
624 13s Ford Motor. Can.. B. 100a 20 20 20 20
19s 34 Ford MLtd(p36 3-5c) 21 54 54 54 54
84 4 Foremost Fabrics. .. 1 S s 4 S
18S 8 Oarlock rke <1.20) . . 1 8 8 8 8
12 24 Gen Aviation 1 34 34 34 34
114 4 GELtd rts(p36 3-5e) 2 7 7 7 7
78 1* GenGAEcv pf B(«)150a 194 20 194 20
314 4 Gen Theat Eq cv pf. 2 M ft
in 204 Glen Alden Coal <4). 13 154 164 154 164
1H W Gold Seal Elec new 5 + l* i*
lli* 1H Goldman Sarhs T C.. 52 2** 3’*» 2** 3
2«0 130 Gt AA* P Tea n Yt6 V4 10i 149 149 149 149
1224 112 Gt AtAPac Tea pf(7) 10a 1154 1164 1154 1164
7*4 2*4 Gulf Oil of Fenna... 30 29 32 29 32
184 9 Hackmester Lind... 1 13 13 13 13
74 4 Hecla Mlninc !40c). 6 44 44 44 44
84 34 Holllnger Gold t70e. 1 44 4S 4S 44
104 44 Horn < A C) 1st pf. .. 1 4 4 4 4
43S 23 Horn & Hard <2 4 >.. 2 264 264 264 264
•4 14 Hudson Bay M A S.. 10 2 24 2 24
10 54 Hydro El Securities. 1 94 94 94 94
6'* 24 Hvcrade Food Prod. 2 34 34 34 34
304 234 Hyjtrade Sylvanla t3 1 21 21 21 21
72 444 Humble Oil (2). 2 45 454 45 454
184 74 Imp Oil of Can (50e) 1 84 84 84 84
*14 54 Indiana Pipe Llnet 1) 1 64 64 64 64
49S 44 Instill lnv. 14 34 44 3S 44
94 14 Imaurance Seeurity.. 1 24 24 24 24
154 74 Int Petroleum < 1)... 8 94 94 94 94
44 4 Int Products. 10 4 4 4 4
45 5 Internatl Utility (A) 2 64 64 64 64
104 IS Int Utilities B. 19 2 2S 2 24
44 4 Int Utilities war.... 14 4 4 4
45 4 Interstate Equities. 20 4 14 4 14
35 94 In'state Equity cv pf. 2 104 11 104 11
7 1 Italian Superpow A. 12 14 14 14 14
34 4 Italian Super deb rts 2 4 4 4 4
11 34 Klelnert Rubber._ 2 44 44 44 44
34 1 Lakey Foundry. 2 It* 14 14 14
,-Prev. 1831.-, Stock »nd Bale*— '
High. Lo» Dividend Rate. Add 00. Open. Hlth. Low. Close.
274 94 Lehigh Coal & Nv(l) 14 94 10 94 9\
10 9 Lindsay Light (80c). 1 8 8 8 8
25 64 Lona Star Qaa n **c. 6 84 84 84 84
1124 90 Long laid Lt pf (7).. 60a 964 964 964 964
2 4 Louisiana Lan A Ex. 1 4 4 4 4
4 A Magdalena Synd.... 4 4 4 4 4
86 174 Mass Ut cv pf (2 4). 76s 20 204 20 204
64 4 Mavis Bottling (A).. 3 4 4 4 4
1134 43 Mead Johnson (t5).. 3 48 494 48 494
124 44 Memph N Gas (60c). 1 44 44 44 44
14 V* Mid Sta Pet vtc B.... 1 4 4 4 4
254 44 Mid West Ut (b*%). 87 4 4 6 4 4 6
91 60 Mlnne-Honey pf (6). 10s 66 66 66 66
11 4 Mo-Kan Pipe Line... 79 14 14 1 1
64 2 Mountain Prod (80c). 8 24 24 24 24
894 184 Nat Bd A S Corp (1). 6 214 22 214 22
264 94 Nat Fuel Gas (1).... 8 124 184 124 13
64 14 Nat Investors. 3 24 24 24 24
4 4 Nat Investors war... 2 1111
22 14 Nat Sh T Sec A IfOe. 6 14 14 14 14
174 6 Nat Transit (1). 4 9 94 9 94
23 11 Neptune Meter A1 20 1 11 11 11 11
86 484 New Eng Pow pf (*) 20s 654 664 664 654
61 204 New Jersey Zinc (2). 1 274 274 274 274
584 94 Newmont Mining.... 7 114 12 114 12
74 14 N T Shipbuilding Cp. 8 24 24 24 24
894 464 N Y Steam Cp (2.60). 2 604 604 604 60'*
New T Transit IN).. 1 34 3V» 84 84
164 64 Niag-Hud Pow (40c) 72 6 4 7 6 4 64
S4 A Niag-Hud Pow ▲ w.. 3 4 4 4 4
84 2 Niag-Hud Pow B w.. 7 24 24 24 24
11S 2 Nit? Share(lfd) iOe. 61 3 34 3
Northern Pipe Line n 1 44 44 44 44
lgit 4 W Engineers (1). • 1 6 6 6 6
Vft -fc Ohio Copper.- - 4 v* -fe
3V> H Outboard Motor B, • • 1 % T4 % 7*
2 4 PantepecOil. 3 4 4 4 4
64 24 Paramount Motor... 16 4 4V* 34 34
1094 34 Parker Rust Prf (3).100s 384 40 88V* 40
84 14 Pennroad Corp (40c) 26 3V* 34 84 34
704 444 Penn Wat & I'ow (3) 1 604 504 504 504
34 4 Philip Morris Inc... 1 1*. 1*, 1*« l»,
214 2 Pilot Rad Tube A.... 4 24 3 24 24
10 2 Pitney Bowes (b4%) 1 24 24 24 24
424 17 Pitts riatc Glass (1) 1 184 184 184 18'*
19 6 Plymouth Oil (pJOc). 3 7 7 7 7
44 4 Producers Royalty.. 1 ", 4 4 4
64 '. Pub Util Hold xw... 7 4 4 ■* >*
50 9 Railway A Lt Sec(2) 7 17 17 17 17
1*4 4 Republic Gas Corp. . 2 4 4 4 4
184 9 Rockland L&P (90c). 1 94 94 94 94
34 4 Roosevelt Field Inc. 1 14 14 14 14
214 24 St Regis Paper. 61 4V* 5 44 44
74 24 Salt Creek I'rod (1).. 3 34 34 3'» 34
64 1 Seaboard Util (2»c).. 2 14 lv* D* 1',
17 64 Sec Allied Corp (1).. 11 7 7 7 7
74 14 Segal L A Hdwr. 1 14 14 14 14
44 4 Selected industries.. 1 14 14 14 14
71 244 Sle Ind a! ctfs( 5 4 ).. 8 374 39 *74 39
*4 4 Sentry Safety Cont.. 6 4 4 4 4
84 14 Shenandoah Corp... 1 14 14 14 14
26 8 Shenandoah Corp pf. 1 94 94 94 94
12 4 Silica Gel ctfs. 2 IV* H* 14 14
3434 1144 Singer Mfg («).459s 120 122 120 121
192 33 Smith (A. O.).260s 434 474 42 464
51 61 Sou Calif KJix pf (2) 1 40 40 40 40
' 294 234 So Cal Ed pfB (14). 1 234 234 234 234
274 204 Sou Cal Ed pf C(14) 1 214 214 214 214
44 4 South Corp. 1 1)* 14 14 14
94 4 Southern Nat Gas... 1 A A A ill
, 94 64 So. Union Gas. 2 14 14 14 14
64 v» S VV Gas Utilities... 14 4 4 4
384 1*4 Stand Oil •( lad( 1).. 43 154 164 154 164
234 124 Stand Oil of Ky 1.60. 9 134 134 134 134
624 23 Stand Oil Ohio (2H) 660s 244 244 244 244
101 60 Standl’ALpf (7).. 1 60 60 60 60
• r’.ANU « urau . 1 v4 v4
! 12*4 4 StarrettCorp. 2 4 4 4 4
64 14 Stlnnes (Hugo). 11111
404 2 3 Sun Investing pf.... 2 204 21 204 21
304 144 Swift & Co 12). 9 18 184 18 184
404 184 Swift Internat’l (t4) 4 204 204 194 194
95 40 Swiss Am El pf (6) . ,300s 44 45 43 44
8 24 Syracuse W Mach B. 1 2 2 2 2
184 14 Taggart Corp. 14 34 4 34 4
61 204 Tampa Elee (2.24)... 1 264 264 264 264
154 14 Technicolor Inc. 6 2 24 2 24
9 34 Tech Hughes (60c).. 2 34 4 34 4
124 24 Texon Oll&Land (1). 1 54 54 54 54
1 4 Tob Trod of Del wl.. 7 & & * n,
394 144 Tobacco & All Stks.. 1 204 204 204 204
84 14 Trans Air Trans.... 1 24 24 24 24
134 14 TransLux DLTS.. 10 2 2 2 2
294 4 Trt-Utllltles. 14 4 4 4
16 14 Tublae Chatel. B. ... 6 24 24 24 24
174 34 Un Gas of Canada (1) 1 34 34 34 34
244 94 1 nionOil Asso(1.36) 3 104 104 104 It)7,
164 24 Unit Corp war. 28 .3 34 3 3'«
104 14 Unit Founders. 155 2 24 14 24
114 14 Unit Gas Corp. 32 24 24 24 24
44 4 Unit Gaa Corp war.. 5 4 4 4 4
94 33 Unit Gas pf (7). 4 42 44 42 44
I 3*4 64 Unit Lt * Pw A (1).. 27 64 74 64 7
84 1 U S Elec Pow ww.... ]6 14 14 14 14
60 174 U S Inter Sec 1st pf.. 4 20 22 20 22
49 184 U S Playing Card 2 4 1 184 184 184 184
24 4 Unit Stores v.t.c..... 14 4 4 4
134 84 Unit Verde Exten (1) 2 34 34 34 34
6'« 14 Unit Wall Paper. 11111
144 14 Util Po * Lt (bl0%) 10 24 24 24 24
314 84 UtP*L(B)cfsbl0% 3 12 124 12 124
98 38 Util Pivrft Lt pf(7). lOOe 504 504 50 50
94 14 Utility Equities. 6 14 2 14 2
94 14 Util & Ind . 1 24 24 24 24
194 74 Utility & Ind pf (1’&) 7 94 94 94 94
74 14 Van Camp Pkg. 5 1 1 1 1
7 34 Vick Financial (JOc) 2 34 4 34 4
294 104 Walgreen Co. 2 104 104 104 104
84 14 Walker, H (25e). 2 24 24 24 24
2 4 Watson (J W) Co.... 1 4 4 4 4
4 W Wenden Copper. 1 & 4 & 4
82 25 Western Md pf.10s 204 204 204 20'.
64 14 Wil-low Cafeterias.. 1 24 24 24 24
124 54 WlwrthFWLtd29 3-5c 2 84 84 84 8M
24 4 "Y” Oil A Gas. 5 V* 4 4 4
Dividend rates in dollars based on last quarterly of semi-an
nual payment. *Ex dividend. ’Partly extra. ;P!us 44 in stock,
a Payable in cash or stock. b Payable In stock. e Adjustment
1 dividend, f Plus S'- In stock, s Pius 64 in stock, h Plus 14 lr
j stork, j Plus 2'- m stock, k Plus 104 in stock, m Plus 3'i lit
! stock, n Plus 8'r In stock, p Paid last ypar—no regular rate.
Baltimore Markets
Special Dispatch to The Star.
BALTIMORE, Md„ February 13.—
White potatoes, per 100 pounds. 75a
1.00; sweet potatoes, bushel, 35a80;
yams, barrel, 75al.50; beans, bushel,
1.50a2.50; beets, crate, 1.50al.60; cab- i
bage, hamper. 75al.40; carrots, bushel,
1.00al.25; cauliflower, crate, 1.75al.90;
celery, crate, 1.50a3.75: Kale, bushel,
25a30: lettuce, crate, 2.50a3.50; onions,
per 100 pounds. 3.00a4.00; peppers,
crate. 1.50a3.00: spinach, bushel. 50a80;
squash, bushel. 1 00al.75; tomatoes,
crate. 75a3.00; turnips, hamper, 15a25;
apples, bushel, 75a 1.75; grapefruit, box,
1.25a2.50; oranges, box, 2.00a4.00;
strawberries, pint, 20a221 -.
Chickens—Young. 20a 22: Leghorns.
17al8: old hens, 15a20; Leghorns, old,
15a 16: roosters. Ilal3: ducks. 12a22:
geese. Ilal7: pigeons, pair. 20a25.
Eggs—Receipts, 1,316 cases. Nearby j
firsts, 14!4al4,2; Western firsts, 14>4a
14>2.
Butter—Good and fancy creamery,
21a241te; ladles. 15al6; process, 20a21;
store packed. 10.
| 3 Southern Gas 6s '35. 23 28 28
2 Southw OAE 5s A 57 74% 74 74%
3 Staley MU Ss 42. .. 67% 67% 67%
11 Stand Gas A E 6s ’35 73% 7fl 73%
10 Stand GAE cv fis '35 74 70% 74
2 Stand Gas A E 6s 51 63% 63 83%
♦ Stand Gas A E 6s 66 64 63 84
5 Stand Inv 5%s '39. 55% 55% 55%
6 Standard P A L 6s 57 62 61 62
1 Sun Oil 5%s '39... 90 90 90
9 Super of Illm 4%s '68 68% 69 69%
3 Swift Co 5s 44... 98% 98% 98%
5 Tenn Pub Serv 5s '70 77 77 77
2 Tex City Gas 5s 48 36% 36% 36%
3 Texas Elec 5s 60 wi 80% 80 80%
3 Texas P A L 5s 56 85 84 85
31 Tob PS NJ 6' s 2022 86% 86 86%
1 Ulen Ac Co 6s 44_ 29 29 29
14 Union Gulf 5s '50 . 92% 92% 92%
1 Unit P * L 5%s '59 80 80 80
12 Unit Lt Ac Ry 5%s '52 58 56 57
1 Un.t PAL 6%s '74. 56% 56% 564,
2 United P A- L 6s 75 53 53 53
1 Unit Lt A- Ry 5s 32. 95% 95% 95%
2 U S Rub 6%s '33_ 79% 79% 79%
1U S Rub 6%s 39_ 34% 34% 34%
1 Valspar 6s '40. 11% 11% 11%
6 Va Pb Ser 5%s A '46 75% 74% 75
2 Va Public Serv 6s '46 69 67% 69
3 Va Pub Serv 5s B '50 70 67% 70
5 Waldorf-Aster 7s 54. 11% 11 11
1 Wash W A' Pow 5s 60 92 92 92
2 West News Der 6s 44. 23 23 23
2 West Penn 5s 2030 . 62% 62% 62%
7 Wes Tex Ut 5s A '57 63% 62% 63
2 Wiscon PAL 5s F '58 83 83 83
FOREIGN BONDS.
2 Ara Mtg Bank 7s '47 41% 31 31%
lOBuen Air Pr 7%s '47 37 36 38
10 Cent Bk Ger 6s A '52 34% 34 34%
10 Cent Bk Co 6s B 51. 46% 46 48%
7 Com Pr Bk 5%s '37. 41 40% 41
1 Cuban Tel 7%s A '41 76% 76% 76%
5 Danish Cons 5s S3 45 45 45
8 Eur E Cp 6%s '65 xw 45 45 45
26 Europ Mtg 7s C '67 27% 26% 27%
7 Finld R M Bk 6s '61 27 25% 27
2 Ger Cons Mun 6s '47 29% 29 39%
8 Ger Con Mun 7s '47 30 29% 30
2 Ham ESAU 5%s C 38 40 40 40
1 Iearco Hyd El 7s '52 54% 54% 54%
1 Ital Sup Pow 8s A '63 37 37 37
2 Mendoza Pr 7%s '51 32 32 32
11 Nippon El P 6%s '53 53% 52% 53%
3 Prussia Elec 6s '54 .. 29% 29 29%
1 Rio de Jan 6%.s '59. 14*, 14% 14%
6 Ruhr G Co 8%s A '53 33% 33% 33%
1 Santa Fe Arg 7s '45 34 34 34
2 Satida F Ltd 5s A '55 99% 98% 99%
11 Saxon Pub Wk 5s '32 41 40% 41
5 Stinnes 7s '36 xw.... 28% 28% 28",
16 Stinnes 7s '46 xw . 26% 24% 26%
4 Unit Indust 6%s 41. 28% 28% 28%
ww—With warrants.
xw -Without warrant*,
n—New.
wi—When issued.
i
Trade Reports at a Glance.
By the Associated Press.
NEW YORK, February 13.—1Tabloid review of wholesale and retail
business conditions as reported to Bradstreet's this week from the follow
ing centers, on the basis of comparisons with conditions in the same areas
in the corresponding week last year:
Wholesale Manufacturing
and job trade. Retail trade, and Industry. Collections.
Pittsburgh . Quiet Quiet Quiet Slow
Chicago . Fair Fair Quiet Fair
Cleveland . Quiet Quiet Slow Slow
Detroit . Fair Quiet Slow Fair
Indianapolis . Quiet Quiet Fair Slow
Louisville . Quiet Qui-rt Quiet Slow
Duluth . Quiet Fair Quiet Slow .
Kansas City. Quiet Quiet Quiet Slow
Minneapolis . Quiet Quiet Quiet Slow
St Louis . Quiet Quiet Quiet Slow
Milwaukee . Fair Fair Fair Slow
Des Moines. Fair Quiet Fair Slow
St. Paul. Quiet Quiet Quiet Slow
Baltimore . Quiet Quiet Quiet Slow
Comment
Pittsburgh—Coal prices low; building operating on curtailed basis;
tableware continues upward; volume of wholesale women's apparel below
1931.
Chicago—Steel orders from rails slightly larger; cold weather stimu
lates coal sales; lumber shipments increased; conservatism apparent in
general trade.
Cleveland—Lumber trading below 1931; steel business only slightly
active.
Detroit—The automobile Industry appears fairly optimistic; retail
business dragging: wholesalers receiving cautious commitments.
Indianapolis—Retail volume small; general industry operating on re
duced schedule; unemployment intense.
Louisville—Hardware in moderate demand: millinery quiet; fruits and
vegetables plentiful; retailers featuring "sales” to dispose of Winter goods.
Duluth—Easter orders at wholesale encouraged; mining Industry
unimproved; lumber continues curtailed.
Kansas City—Manufacturers working on curtailed basis; export busi
ness very poor: volume of dry goods and furnishings under 1931.
Minneapolis—Wholesale and retai coal sales fair, but collec
tions very slow: rubber footwear in demand; public purchasing power
considerably below former years.
St. Louis—Opening day of automobile show very successful; drugs
and chemicals fairly steady; warm weather helps moving of hardware and
paints..
Milwaukee—Shoe manufacturing holding fairly well; prices of farm
and dairy products very low.
Des Moines—Dollar day “sales” successful: autos and accessories quiet;
no change in unemployment.
St. Paul—Furniture, clothing, shoes most active lines; groceries and
confectionery equal last year; automobile show well attended.
Baltimore—General trade preparing for Spring activity; retail trade
spasmodic, due to lessened purchasing power; grain market unimproved.
Shirt Firm in Bankruptcy.
KANSAS CITT, February 13 UP).—
The Baltimore Shirt Co. of Kansas
City and St. Louis was placed in in
voluntary bankruptcy yesterday by ac
tion of Federal Judge Merrill E. Otis.
A petition in Involuntary bankruptcy
was filed by Hipsh. Inc., and Harry
Hipsh and Phillip Hipsh, and H. V.
Christensen.
William E. Davis, president of the
Baltimore Shirt Co., filed an answer
expressing a willingness for the con
cern to be declared bankrupt.
A suit in equity was filed immediately
afterward by the Goshen Shirt Manu
facturing Co. of Chicago, asking a re
ceiver and setting forth a claim for
$23,135.
PARIS BOURSE PRICES.
PARIS, February 13 (A1).—Three pel
cent rentes, 79 francs. Five per cent
loan. 101 francs 45 centimes. Exchange
on London, 87 francs 40 centimes. The
dollar was quoted at 25 francs 35
centimes.
• ■ ■■ --
Former Motor Official Found Dead
PHILADELPHIA, February 13 1/P).—
Charles S. Chalmers, 51. former presi
dent of the Chalmers Motor Co., wa/
found asphyxiated In his bed room bj
gas. coming from a rubber hose which
he had attached to a jet.
Mrs. Chalmers said he recently hac
suffered financial reverses. Chalmen
had made two previous attempts, police
said, to end his life.
MANY MS SHOW
• NET GAINS IN 1931
Recent Annual Reports of 27
Corporations Present In
teresting Results.
■ 1 ■
The companies so far reporting this
year which revealed an Increase in net
income for the full year 1931 (calendar
or fiscal), as compared with that of the
full year 1930. include, according to the
Standard Statistics Co.:
Net income.
Company. 1931. 1930.
Auburn Auto .$3,579,848 $1,018,331
Brown Shoe . 1.356.179 1,334.042
Copeland Products..314,411 107.039
Detroit Edison. 11,429.135 11,116.607
Devoe & Reynolds.... 334.590 132,299
East. Utilities Assn. 2.162,198 1,971.016
Endicott-Johnson ... *2.580.560 765.268
Faiardd Sugar...-. 226.009 222.817
Firestone T. & R. 4.219.270 1.541.034
Glidden Co. 172.250 tl8,635
Holland (A.) A Son.
Inc . 542.611 273 625
Kansas City P. & Lt. 4.516.972 4,030.295
Kelvinator . 1.761.109 1 601.016
Manhattan Shirt. 102.312
Montreal L, Ht • P. 9.766.MI L943.S84
New Eng. T. A T. Co. 11.875,225 11 432.023
Pacific Lighting . * 020.125 7.9M 486
p'o Ga.it * Coke. 1.561 582 7 197.012
Reynolds «R. J.) Tob. 36.396.817
Scott Paper Co....... 997.361 986.846
So. New Eng. T. St T. 3 *29.454 3.411.331
T>rk-Hukhe* . 3.311.591 3.0M.887
UmonBis A Piper.. 112.584 *155,283
United Coro . 18.445.327 16,0.9,527
United Gas Imp. „ «,ni4i
(Parent Co A ..... 34.750.115 32.810,744
U 8 Ftadio-Telev.... 801 588 366,487
•Eleven months.
tDeflcit.
Everybody’s
Business
Administrators of Recon
struction Finance Cor
poration to Steer Clear
of Unsound Economic
Policies.
BY DR. MAX WINKLER.
NEW YORK. February 13 (N.A.N.A.)
—Reduced to simple. Intelligible terms,
the proposed Glass-Steagall bill, de
signed to supplement the work of the
Reconstruction Finance Corporation in
speeding up the economic and financial
rehabilitation of the United States,
provides in the first place for the use
bv the Federal Reserve Board of the
United States Government obligations
as a basis for currency issues against
which there must be a 40 per cent
cover.
In other words. Government securi
ties will become eligible for the issu
ance of Federal Reserve notes in ex
cess of the present legal cover, thereby
raising the effective total of free gold
bv about $900,000,000.
It may be pointed out. perhaps, that
in many countries the collateral re
quirements for currency issues are
much more liberal than they are in
the United States and that under ex
isting conditions, with the use of col
lateral decidedly limited, it will be next
to impossible to take steps necessary
IU tiitfi k unwwwu,
While the above provision Is of a
temporary character only, covering a
period of 12 months, it is this provis
ion which is likely to be interpreted as
inflation, but there is no valid reason
for the United States to adhere stub
bornlv to the maintenance of a ratio
of reserve to notes in circulation very
substantially in excess of 40 per cent.
Furthermore, additional currency will
not be authorized without providing for
reasonably adequate protection which,
in this case, will consist of United
States Government obligations.
Difficulties Likely.
Difficulties will arise as soon as
money will begin to be printed, regard
less of whether or not a cover is pro
vided for. Such point, if it should be
reached, will of course constitute in
flation, pure and simple.
The framers of the bill, however, as
well as those charged with guiding the
financial destinies of the American
people, know enough about the evils
which arise from attempt to seek sal
vation from economic troubles in the
printing presses, to steer clear of un
sound economic and financial policies.
The increase in the present amount
of free gold—that is, the amount in
excess of the required 40 per cent, is
expected to check fears incident upon
■ further withdrawals for European ac
! count. However, no account seems to
| have been taken of the possible diffi
culties which may arise in connection
with foreign investments in the United
States. Those who have so far com
mented on the bill have for some
reason seen fit to ignore this not en
tirely irrelevant factor.
The second provision relates to the
broadening of the basis upon which
member banks can secure accommoda
tions from the Federal Reserve System.
Under existing conditions, banks with
fundamentally sound, but not readily
salable assets, cannot obtain aid from
the system, unless their holdings are
eligible for rediscount.
As a result, institutions are obliged
to struggle for liquidity at any cost.
This means that banks must retain
only eligible paper and convert all
other assets, in order to be able to
withstand difficulties arising from the
desire of clients and creditors to with
draw their deposits.
Amusing Spectacle.
In this way. one often encounters the
amusing spectacle of finding banks
which are liquid to the extent of almost
100 per rent. In other words, banks
were obliged to assume the role of
pawnshops which must, by the very
nature of their business, almost al
ways be in a position to pay out 100.
cents on tbe dollar.
The new provision should go a long
way lorward in putting a stop to bank
failures which, more than any one
single factor, have been responsible for
the continued liquidation of securities
and commodities. Member banks will
1 be privileged to apply for and obtain
I accommodation for a period of one
I year only after they have used all of
their available eligible commercial as
sets and United States securities and
are in immediate need of assistance
.which they may not otherwise secure
to avert failure.
The rate of discount of bank assets
upon which accommodations will be
based is left to the Federal Reserve
Board. In no event, however, shall the
rate be less than 1 per cent higher
than the prevailing rate of discount at
the Federal Reserve Bank of any dis
trict using this privilege.
Inasmuch as hoarding has been
caused, to a very large extent, by the
uninterrupted failure of banks in all
garts of the country, the stopping of
ank failures, which is one of the chief
features of the program, is confidently
expected to result in the return of hid
den money to circulation and to the
legitimate channels of commerce and
industry.
(Copyrieht. 1932. by the North American
Newspaper Alliance. Inc.)
New York Cotton
Special Dispatch to The 6tir.
NEW YORK. February 13.—Cotton
was active and higher today on general
buying and covering, including some
heavy buying by foreign spinners, on
expectations of an early passage in
Washington of the new finance bill
and on the strength In the outside
markets. Profit-taking resulted in a
partial reaction, leaving prices at the
close 12 to 16 points net higher. Spots
were up 15 points at 6.85.
Cotton range:
Open. High. Low Close
March . 6.75 6 77 6.71 6.71
, mSv ..!. 6 94 6 97 6.69 691
July . 7 10. 7.12 . 7.06 7.01
October ....... 7.33 7 34 7 28 7.3(
December . 7.46 7 51 7.44 7.4,
January. ..... 7.57 7.51 7.51
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PRICES
SHOW RESISTANCE TO DECLINE
Most Other Glasses of Farm Commodities
Reveal Continuation of Recent Sagging
Tendency—Shipments Small.
Fruits and vegetables were making
a better showing than most of the other
classes of commodities in a generally
sagging market the second week of Feb
ruary, says the United States Depart
ment of Agriculture. Bureau of Agri
cultural Economics, market news serv
ice. Price gains were fairly numerous
in leading lines of fresh products and
there were few imprtant declines. Ship
ments and track holdings are not large
enough to exert any great pressure of
supplies.
Onions again led off with small but
fairly widespread advances. Potato
prices were slightly irregular, but gen
erally well maintained. Some cabbage
markets recovered part of recent losses.
Sweet potatoes have followed a fairly
steady course in most centers of trade.
Apples showed little further change, but
the trend has been slightly downward
since the first of the year, at a time
when apple prices ought to be rising a
little with the progress of the storage
season. ..
When compared with a year ago. the
market on fresh produce seems to have
done fairly well during a period of ex
tremely severe declines in the commodity
markets. Cabbage and carrots are
somewhat higher than they were a year
ago and onions are selling at six times
the price of February, 1931. Southern
lettuce and celery are close to last sea
son's level. Some Northern fruits and
vegetables. Including apples, potatoes
and sweet potatoes, sell much lower tills
season, although the larger yield partly
offsets the weaker price range for these
lines.
Potato Market Irregular.
There was little in the potato market
news during the first part of February
to move the price trend either way. It
is the dull time of year for this product.
Holdings are fairly well known in late
Winter. Shipments are at limited
volume and demand quite steady.
Course of values responds mainly to oc
casional Interference from weather con
ditions and in some degree to the
progress of the early Southern crop.
Shipments are lighter than at this
time la.-t year, but tend to increase on
any slight upturn in prices. Slow, dull
markets prevailed in nearly all produc
ing sections. In the Rochester district
there was a slightly weaker tone re
puted without much change in price.
Grower: were being paid 25c to 30c
bulk per bushel for No. 1 stork and
dealers were selling sacked potatoes
j around fi8c per 100 pounds. Distribution
I of the shipments continues satisfactory.
Most of the carloads are going to points
in Pennsylvania. Virginia, or the Caro
linas. Prices are steady in the Middle
West and Far West.
A range of 40c to 70c covers most
sales In the potato belt from Maine
west to the Pacific Coast. Seed stock,
of course, sell at special prices. De
mand for seed potatoes is light. The
February market for Maine potatoes
has been very dull and prices have
continued close to the lowest points,
i Shipments from the State are now
lagging about 6.800 carloads behind
those of the corresponding date last
season. In only one week since the be
ginning of the season have Maine
potato shipments exceeded or equaled
the movement of the corresponding
week last season.
Receipts in Eastern markets are
' moderate to fairly liberal. A few car
i loads from Canada were reported at
i Boston. Demand is fairly good in New
i York and Boston, but slow in other
large Eastern cities. New potatoes are
not vet arriving in quantities large
enough to affect the market much, al
though considerable stock from Cuba,
i Porto Rico, and Bermuda was offered in
1 New York, and Florida Bliss Triumphs
' are selling in that market rather low
at $2 to $2.50 per bushel.
Maine Green Mountain potatoes sell
at nearly unchanged prices In leading
markets, with a jobbing range of 90
cents to $1.10. although Washington
reached top at $1.35 and Atlanta quoted
a little stock at $1 50. Fancy Prince
Edward Island potatoes brought $1.60
pej 90 pounds in Boston. New York
and Pennsylvania round white varieties
were quoted at 85 cents to $1.15. and
usually a little below the level of Maine
potatoes in the same market. Chicagq
carlot market is steady, with 80 cents
per 100 pounds the ruling price and a
steady position on sales for March and
April delivery.
Sweets Irregular.
Markets for sweet potatoes appeared
ratner unsettled. ' A few lines, including
Virginia and Tennessee stock, sold a
| little higher, but some other kinds were
slightly lower in a few markets. Vir
ginia potatoes sold in a few' cities at
| 35 cents to 70 cents per bushel. Dela
; ware and Maryland sweets of the Jersey
type followed a jobbing range of 50
I cents to 85 cents, and North Carolina
] Porto Ricans sold slightly below this
stock, although best lots brought 85
cents in Washington. Maryland and
I Delaware white yams were quoted 40
cents to 60 cents in Philadelphia, and
some ungraded stock in barrels at $1.25
in Baltimore. Supplies of sweet po
tatoes are fairly liberal in most Eastern
markets, but reported limited in Boston.
Demand is slow in nearly all markets.
Carrots Selling well.
Active trading in carrots was a some
what unusual feature of the market the
first two weeks of February. Apparently
a certain amount of speculation was
taking place at country shipping points,
causing prices to rise above the level of
jobbing sales in Eastern cities. Many
lots in Western New York brought $2
j per 100 pounds for unwashed sacked
stock, while in New York City jobbing
sales were being made at $1.70 to $1.85.
anti in the three leading Eastern mar
kets $1.50 was top price obtained for
! washed carrots, bushel pack. But price
! trend was upward in most Eastern mar
j kets. Shipments this season are still
. ahead of those of last year. when, the
‘ crop was much larger. After this time
| last year 850 cars were shipped from
, New York producing districts. Accord
ing to local trade information, less than
half this quantity remains to be shipped
this season.
Onion Market Firm.
General trend of the onion market
has been slightly upward thus far in
' February, with a few further gains the
i second week of the month. Prices East
I and West at country shipping points do
! not vary much from $2 per 50-pound
i sack in large lots* Quiet conditions pre
: vailed in Eastern producing sections. A
limited amount of trading was reported
ih the Rochester district at $1.85 to
$2.15 per 50 pounds, and an occasional
car of large sizes as high as $2.25. Not
many car lots of 100-pound sacks were
reported. The output from New York
this season is about 500 carloads behind
that of last season and 1,400 under
that of the season before the corre
sponding date. Eastern holdings of
onions and also carrots appear to be
largely in possession of dealers. Job
bing prices in Eastern markets follow
a steady range at $1.75 to $2.50 per 50
pounds on good yellow stock from East
ern sources. Supplies are moderate
and demand slow. The equivalent of
16 carloads of Chile onions and 8 of
Spanish onions appeared on the New
York market toward the middle of the
month. A few carloads of Spanish and
Canadian stock were offered in Boston
and Philadelphia. Total shipments
from all sources are light and track
holdings in leading markets are by no
means heavy.
Cabbage Market Irregular.
Prices of cabbage follow irregular
trends this month. Gains in Eastern
markets are about balanced by slight
declines. General jobbing range re
mains $16 to $22 per ton In bulk on
New York cabbage of the long-keeping
varieties. Dull, steady conditions pre
vail at Eastern country Alpping points.
The advancing prices in Southern pro
ducing sections, owing to restricted
shipments, have helped the Northern
cabbage market values. Ordinary qual
ity of much Northern stock is a market
handicap.
Apple* Fairly Steady.
The apple markets have shown an
irregular trend for some time, but the
average on leading varieties has moved
slightly downward rather steadily since
the first of the year, although this Is
the season when apple prices sometimes
gain a Mttle with the progress of the
cold storage period. A mild Winter has
lessened the demand to some extent and
injured quality of fruit not in storage,
forcing the marketing of some lots in
larger volume than expected. Such
varieties as the Greening, which are
rather scarce, have held prices quite
well. They «re selling: at 90 cent* to
*1.25 a bushel in Eastern markets. The
barrel pack brings $3 or more, unless
showing scald injury. New York
Baldwins range 75 cents to $1 per
bushel in Eastern cities. The barrel
pack is quoted around $2.50. New York
McIntosh topped the market at $7 per
barrel for a few lots. Eastern St.aymans
sold at $3 to $3.25 per barrel for large
sizes in New York and Philadelphia.
Most Grimes failed to bring more than
75 cents per bushel. Eastern Delicious
sold at $1 to *1.50 and Yorks at 75 cents
to II, although Atlanta quoted $1.25.
Eastern Romes and Wlnesaps sold near
$1, and Black Twigs ranged 75 cents to
$1 per bushel the second week of Febru
ary. Some Virginia Yorks and Stay
mans brought $1.50 in Atlanta.
Company Buys Stock.
NEW YORK, February 13 OP'.—More
than 77,000 shares of stock were ac
quired by the Simm Petroleum Co. from
stockholders under the offer to purchase
100,000 shares at $5 a share, it was an
nounced today. The offer expired yes
terday. The company has arranged to
purchase the necessary shares to make
up the deficiency. In response to a
previous offer to purchase i 00.000
shares at $6 a share, the stockholders
turned in upward of 85,000 shares.
$)£ fttemitg §iaf
J\DYERTISENENTSl
Received HeueJ
You can find that job;
or some one to work for you—
most readily through a
Star Classified Adv.
'YV%HEN yOU stop to consider that The Star—
7yy Evening and Sunday—is read by practically
everybody in and around Washington, you
can appreciate how far-reaching are the results of
an advertisement in The Star Classified Section.
Copy for The Star Classified Section may be left
at any of the following authorized Branch Offices—
all ready to serve you without fee; only regular rates
are charged.
In the Northwest
11th and Park rd.—Arm
strong's Pharmacy.
14th and P sts. — Day’s
Pharmacy.
1135 14th st.—M arty’s
Cigar & Magazine Store.
17th and Que sts. — Ken
ner’s Pharmacy.
15th and V sts. — G. O.
Brock.
2912 14th st.—Colliflower
Art & Gift Co.
3401 14th st.—Bronaugh’s
Pharmacy.
14th and Buchanan sts.—
Hohberger's Pharmacy.
14th st. and Colorado ave.
—O’Donnell's Pharmacy.
3209 Mount Pleasant st.—
Mount Pleasant Cigar
and News Shop.
1823 Columbia rd. — The
Billy Shop.
2162 California st. — Co
lodny Brothers.
Wardman Park Pharmacy.
215 N. Y. ave.—Sanitary
Pharmacy.
1st and K sts.—Duncan’s
Pharmacy.
7th and K sts.—Golden
berg’s (time clerk’s
desk).
7th and O sts. — Lincoln
Drug Store.
7th st. and R. I. ave.—J.
French Simpson.
llth and M sts. — L. H.
Forster’s Pharmacy.
In the Southwest
10th st. and Va. ave.—
Herbert’s Pharmacy.
316 4!i st.—Harris’ Drug
Store.
4Vi and L sts.—Columbia
Pharmacy.
In the Northeast
208 Mass. ave. — Capitol
Towers Pharmacy.
4th and H sts. — Homo
Drug Store.
4th and E. Cap. sts.—Paul’s
Drug Store.
907 H st.—Garren’s Music
Store. . .
12th and Md. ave.—Luck
ett’s Pharmacy.
7th and Md. ave.—Louis
F. Bradlev.
9th and U sts.—M. H.
Hunton’s Pharmacy.
Ga. ave. and Upshur st.—
Petworth Pharmacy.
221 Upshur st. — Monck’s
Pharmacy.
5916 Ga. ave.—Brightwood
Pharmacy.
Ga. ave. and Kennedy st
—Lampkin’s Pharmacy.
2901 Sherman ave.—Sher
man Ave. Pharmacy.
6224 3rd st. — Stewart’s
Pharmacy.
1905 Mass. ave. — Dupont
Pharmacy.
18th and Fla. ave.—Bern
stein’s Drug Store.
Fla. ave. and 1st st.—N.
Relskin.
North Capitol st. and R. I.
ave. — Parker's Phar
macy.
1742 Pa. ave. — J. Louis
Krick.
21st and G sts—Quigley’a
Pharmacy.
25th st. and Pa. ave. —
Columbia Drrg Store.
3315 Conn. ave. — J oil’s
Newsstand.
5017 Conn. avf.-Hi&rert
Community Drug Store.
Wisconsin ave. and Macomb
st.—Harry C. Taft.
4231 Wisconsin ave.—Mor
gan Bros.’ Pharmacy.
Takoma Park, 359 Cedar st
—Mattingly Bros.’ Phar
macy.
In Georgetown
30th and P sts.—Morgan
Bros.’ Pharmacy.
S411 M st.—Moskey’s Phar
macy.
1834 Wisconsin ave.—
Haney’s.
35th and O sts. — Sugar’s
Drug Store.
In the Southeast
3rd and Pa. ave.—O’Don
nell’s Drug Store.
North Capitol
and Eye—Ken
ealy’s Phar
macy.
20th and R. L
ave. — Collins’
Pharmacy,
Woodridge.
3500 12th st.—
Brookland
Pharmacy,
Brookland.
4th and R. I. ave.
—John G.
Biggs’ Phar
macy.
Che3apeake
Junction —Dr.
F. L. Wight, Jr.
Therm's Onm Nmar You
8th and Eve sts.
—F. P. Weller’s
Pharmacy.
11th and Pa.
ave. — Fealy’s
Pharmacy.
1907 Nichols
ave., Anacostia
—Healy’s Drag
Store.
13th and East
Capitol sts.—
Lincoln Park
Pharmacy.
2204 Minnesota
ave. — Sloan’s
Drug Store:
F. S. Boisfeuil
let, prop.
FAILURES ARE LAID
TO CREDIT METHODS

Poor lodgment in HandHng im>
ooiuvti Declared Important Omm
•f Bnemeia XortfR*
By the Associated Press.
Poor credit method* were faend to
be among the Important setters of fail
ure In s recent study by the Commerce
Department covering business mortali
ties in Newark, N. J.. considered a rep
resentative city by the department.
Most of the concerns, whether in ths
retail, wholesale or contracting business,
reported large losses on bad debts and
considerable trouble in collecting ac
counts, while all conducted a large pro
portion of their business on a credit
basis.
For the year preceding failure*, the
average bad debt loss on open credit
extended to customers by concern* able
to furnish figures was 7.2 per cent.
The average loss on installment credit
was 17.1 per cent.
The average bad debt loss on open
accounts was 16.5 per cent for contrac
tors who failed, 10.8 per cent for whole
salers, 4 8 per cent for retailers, 11.7
per cent for automobile dealers, 16 8
per cent for radio dealers and 3.6 per
cent for furniture stores.
Installment credit losses were very
liigrii for real estate dealers who failed,
47.1 per cent; plumbing and heating
contractors had an average of 32.3 per
cent; electrical contractors, 13.3 per
cent; furniture stores, 9.6 per cent, and
automobile dealers. 9.5 per cent.
Of the 238 businesses reporting on
the subject only 32, or 13 4 per cent,
used credit bureaus and 206. or 88 6 per
cent, did not use this agency as an aid
in carrying on their credit business.
-.. ■■ 0
New York Central Income.
NEW YORK. February 13 UP).—Net
income of the New York Central Rail
road Co. for 1931 showed a decrease of
$33,551,690 from the preceding calen
dar year, the company reported today.
The company's net for last year
amounted to $2,430,101, compared with
$35,981,791 for 1930. Net operating In
come for the period was $28,075,578,
against $57,235,527 for the preceding 12
months.
For the final quarter last year net
operating Income totaled $3,427,846, a
decrease of $7,167,936 from the corre
sponding three months of 1930. Net
income ior the three months ended De
cember 31 last showed a deficit of $2.
312.561. compared with net Income of
$4,055,334 for the like period of the
preceding year.

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