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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 28, 1932, Image 77

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1932-08-28/ed-1/seq-77/

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SEHJ> in A MAP PICTURE·
HIGH LIGHTS OF HISTORY
The Story Of Columbus—Part XI
By J. CARROLL MANSFIELD
0 U THE DAV FOLLOWING
Columbus' discovery of
Saw Salvador, while th*
THREE SHIPS LAY AT ANCHOR,
THE NATIVES SWARMED OUT
IN THEIR DU60UT CAWOBS,
BRINGING FRUITS .VEGETABLES
AND GOLD OQ.KIAMENTS TO
BARTER WITM THE 5PAWIARD5
fop Ci lass beads, hawk bells,
COLORED CAPS AMD OTHER
TRINKETS
The TRA&INÙ WAS BRISK AND AMiMAiep;j
Each thinking he was getting
THE BETTER BARGAIN.THE SIGHT
Of SO MANY GOLD ORNAMENTS
AROUSED "THE CUPIDITY OF THE SfAWARDSj
AWDTHEYASKEDTHE ImDiAHS by SIÙNS
WHEQE THE PRECIOUS METAL CAME FROM
IM REPLY THE RED MEM POINTED
το the South and made motions
TO EXPRESS "A LONG JOURNEY
ACROSS THE WATER." ·
STILL believing that HE WAS Some -
WHERE OFF THE COAST OF ASIA,
Columbus thought that the
RICH LAM£>THE INDIANS MEAUT
MUST BE NOME OTHER THAN THE*
ISLAND OF CfPANQO (ΛΡ*ν). «
I Coi-LIMBuS AT ONCE MAt>E PREPARATIONS
1 TO SEEK THIS ISLE OF GOLD- WITH THE
A«D OF WIS IKICMAN FRIENDS, THE
SHIPS WERE QUICKLY PROVISION®» AMP·
THE WATER CASKS PILLEE?·
San Salvador
(watun«5 i.)
JAMAICA
Finally, Columbus came to am island
SO VAST 7 MAT HE THOUGHT AT FlRST
HE UAC> PEACHED THE MAINLAND OP
Asia . Me gave it the name op JuanA
in honor op Queen Isabella's
PAU6MTEQ
; ^ %ài3j=à=
^IJOs
On THE EVENING OP OCTOBER 14,
1492, AFTER BIDDING PARC WELL TO
THE HOSPITABLE IΝ HABITA NT5, WHO
MOURNED TO SEE THEM GOjte S PA NIAQD*|
PE-EMBARKED (NTHElQ. SHIPS AMP
sailed away from Sam ôalvadoR.
Columbus took with him some
Indians,who had p»ckep up a pew
WORD5 OP SPANISH,To act AS INTER
PRETERS IN DEALING WOH THE NATIVES |
OF OTHER I SLA KIPS
I The Spaniaqds wewt ashore at one
Place to explore-. Later,Columbus
SAILED UP AMD DOWN THE COAST POO.
SEVERAL HUNDRED MUES BEFORE HE
FOUND "THE βΝΡ OF THE ISLAND
THE NATIVES TOLD THE WHTTE MEM
THAT EAST OP JUANA LAY A BlG
ISLAND (jumy acreaaep· *> ha/t/}
WHERE THEY COULD OBTAIN MUCH GOLD.
] ©f»3 #r* CtmmmiL >*AU»r>eH>
Foq days the Spaniards sailed to the
South through a SEA dotted with
BEAUTIFUL TROPICAL ISLANDS, WHICH
Columbus named after Saints or.
neHBERS OF THE SfltMlSH Ro*AL FAMILY.
The prospect op finding great
WEALTH CAUSED A RIFT AMONG
Columbus' followε«5.Μα«τιν Pinion,
CAPTAlKl of the Pinta", DESERTED
THE OTHER TWO SHIPS AND RACED
EASTWARD, WITH EVERY SAIL set, to
be the first to lay ms hands
on the Gold—: το o* cotmuuep.
m
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1
MllllIllIllillllllIllIllllllllllllimnïïlïïTinïïnitS
Boneyard for Dead Circuses
Continued from Eleventh Page
ness came about through the World's Fair in
St. Louis in 1903. Hall had been commissioned
by a Chicago firm to supply them with horses,
at his own price, so well did they respect his
judgment and integrity. However, they failed
to limit him as to the number of horses de
sired, and in a few days Chicago was flooded
with his purchases.
This led to the job of handling the horses
foe the "Boer War Show" at the fair. In
trigued by the potentialities of the show busi
ness. Hall purchased the stranded Lemon
Brothers' Circus at Omaha in the fall of 1903,
and the next season it went out of Lancaster
as the "William P. Hall Circus."
Π AIN of weeks' duration cut into the profits,
end, disappointed with the "take," Hall
decided that he had best devote his time
to his horses. The next season the show was
leased as "Howe's Great London Circus," under
another management, and thus r ime the start
of the circus brokerage business.
Tlie "Pan-American Shows'" and the equip
ment of the "Walter L. Main Shows," sans title,
were soon stored away in Lancaster, to be sold
piecemeal at a handsome profit. This started
a regular trail of defunct shows to the bone
yard, Hall's farm.
Profiting by the experience of other show
men, Hall stayed out of the circus business as
far as actual operation was concerned, yet he
was able to Indulge his hobby by dabbling with
show equipment, often buying an entire show.
down to the advertising posters, and here and
there a leopard or a horse tent No other man
had ever been associated in such a business, yet
It paid handsome returns for 20 years or more.
Hall, you might say, capitalised on others'
misfortunes; yet when bidding for a show, he
always tried to be fair, and as a rule gave the
unlucky showman more than he could have
received from his creditors, or through any
other source. Shortly before his death, at the
age of 68, Mr. Hall had delegated the actual
management of the circus equipment and horse
business to his lieutenants, his 26-year-old son,
Billy, jr„ and his superintendent of horses,
R. B. McClain.
There is little chance for profitable liquida
tion of the huge stock of circus paraphernalia,
but the horses and animals can be disposed of
profitably.
The decline of railroad circuses, dating from
the abandonment of the greatest advertising
stunt to circusdom. the popular street parade,
reduces the chances of turning over the beauti
ful wagons and cars. Yet is is possible that
some hardy showman, with more enthusiast
than acumen, urn hackled by the tyranny of
tradition, may come along and take tlx. whol·
lot
There is enough good, sound equipment to
equip completely and lavishly a 30-car show
big. as railroad shows go today.
Billy Hall, jr., heading the business sipce
his father's death, has announced that boritoes
will continue as usual, but that no more equip
ment will be bought and that stocks on hand
will be sold. He will continue to handle horses
and other animals.
Ambulance History Long
Τ HE forerunner of the modern ambulance^
which speeds with walling siren through
the city streets on its errands of mercy, was a
covered wagon introduced by a French surge' .
named Larrey for use of the French ΑΜβλ m
caring for the wounded in battle. The flrôt
ci the covered wagons was put in use in 1792.

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