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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 09, 1932, Image 17

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WASHINGTON SEEN
TUB TO HOOVER
Opposition to Homer T. Bone
for Senator Held Costly
to Democrats.
BY JAMES De Κ. BROWN.
Special Dispatch to flie Star.
SEATTLE, Wash., October 8 —
Washington has apparently shifted
from the Roosevelt to the doubtful col
umn during the last week.
This has been the result of a slow
swing toward the Hoover-Curtis ticket,
brought about largely by the bolting of
the Democratic United States senatorial
ticket by lifelong Democrats.
Refuse to Accept Bone.
These party followers refuse to ac
cept Nominee Homer T. Bone, who has
been a candidate for office upon every
political ticket the State has ever had
excepting that of the Prohibition party,
but who now professes to be a Demo
crat.
Gov. Roosevelt's unqualified accept
ance of Bone into the ranks of the
party startled the old line followers.
They are now showing their resentment
by carefully keeping out of the picture,
but quietly informing friends of inten
tions to drop the national ticket.
This internecine warfare is lending
aid to the Republicans, now organized
for the campaign under the leadership
of Ray Carroll. Former National Com
mitteeman R. W. Condon is serving as
secretary.
Little Enthusiasm.
The Democrats re-elected George E.
Starr as State chairman. Starr new is
trying to smooth out the rough spots
due to the influx of liberals and their
success In capturing the nominations
from the Democrats on the letter's
own ticket.
Very little enthusiasm is being shown
by either party. The majority of the
Roosevelt strength is to be found among
those who desire a change of any kind.
The Hoover strength is more closely
knit. Campaign managers now are
engaged in trying to sell their candi
dates to an unresponsive group of
voters.
CAPPER TO ASSIST
HOOVER'S CAMPAIGN
Xftiisas Senator and Henry Field
of Iowa May Exchange
Speaking Dates.
BY CLIFF STRATTON.
BP«cial Bispatch to The Star.
TOPEKA, Kans., October 8.—Herbert
Hoover's stock is going up in Kansas.
The Des Moines speech impressed
Kansas as the report of deeds ac
complished by a fighting man, and ac
cording to editorial comments and re
ports of political observers, has added
impetus to the Hoover swing that has
been in evidence the last six or eight
weeks.
Republican headquarters probably
Tvill devote a large share of their ef
forts the last week of the cam( aign
to capturing the women voters. They
have just awakened to the fact that
Mrs. Harrison Parkman of Emporia,
leading clubwoman of Kansas, already
has organized Woodring (Democrat)
for Governor clubs in more than three
ciuarters of the State.
The wets and drys are staging a hot
contest in the third congressional dis
trict. where Representative Harold Mc
Gugin. Republican, dry. anti-bonus
Legionnaire, is taking it from both wets
and bonus payment advocates. His op
position is E. W. Patterson, also a
Legionnaire, and the only avowed wet
running for office in Kansas this year.
Senator Capper. Republican, enters
the campaign the coming week. He
plans to give three days a week to
the Republican State Central Commit
tee from now until election.
It is not unlikely that Senator Cap
per and Henry Field. Republican nom
inee for the Senate in Iowa to suc
ceed Senator Brookhart. will exchange
speaking dates. Iowa Republicans have
asked for the Kansas Senator, and the
State committee in Kansas wants Field
t3 come to Kansas.
Hoover's chances of holding Kansas
In the Republican colum.i look de
cidedly better than a week ag >- unless
the commodity prices take another dis
astrous flop.
SENATORIAL FIGHT HOT
IN KENTUCKY CAMPAIGN
Barkley and Thatcher Attack Each
Other's Records as Members
of Congress.
BY HARRT ΒΙΛΟΜ.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
LOUISVILLE. Ky„ October 8—The
Kentucky campaign has reached the
name-calling stage. Senator Albsn W.
Berkley and his Republican opponent,
Representative Maurice H. Thatcher,
are sharpshooting at each other's
records.
In his opening speech Senator Bark
ley took Mr. Thatcher to task for his
votes in favor of the Grundy tariff, of
a special rule shutting out amendments
except those offered by the Republican
members of the Ways and Means Com
mittee and his vote against permitting
the House to consider the question of
repealing the eighteenth amendment
or submitting it to the people.
Mr. Thatcher retorted by calling
Senator Barkley a sectional high-tariff
man. pointing out that he voted for ι
high dtftes on coal and oil.
Both of the senatorial nominees are ι
personally dry. yet their espousal of
party platforms has won Senator Bark
ley the indorsement of the Kentucky
Branch. Women's Organization for Na
tional Prohibition Reform, a wet group,
and Mr. Thatcher the indorsement of
the national Prohibition party. The
■women's organization, an influential
body, also threw its strength behind
the nine Democratic congressional nom
inees. Both the senatorial nominees
are on active tours of the State, carry
ing the campaigning brunt for their
parties. After next week Senator Bark
ley will have the help of the congres
sional candidates.
WANT ONE BALLOT
South Carolina Parties Act to Keep
Secrecy of Voting.
BY FITZ HIT.H McMASTE*.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
COLUMBIA. S. C„ October 8—The
Republican .leaders.in the State are ap
pealing to the Supreme Court of the
State to order that only -one ticket, with
the names of both Democratic and Re
publican candidates on it. be used at
the general election. November 8.
For the past 40 years only one ticket
has been at the polling places, and
that was the Democratic ticket. The
Democratic party bore the expense of
the printing. There is no specific pro
vision in the State law requiring that
the State pay for the tickets. There
fore, the Democratic party has paid for
them. This year the Republican party
proposes to share the expense with the
Democratic party, but wishes all names
of candidates to be printed on one
ticket. Its claim is that unless this is
gone the secrecy of the ballot will be
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KEYSTONE PARIS
BOTH OPTIMISTIC
Former Senator Grundy Ends
Year's Retirement and
Joins Hoover Forces.
BY WALTER D. ROOS.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
HARRISBURG. Pa.. October 8 —De
velopments of the week have increased
the optimism of both political camps in
Pennsylvania.
President Hoover's exposition of the
administration's efforts to turn the eco
nomic tide was well received in th<
State. His opening speech and the
rear-platform appearances he made ir
Pennsylvania on his hurried trip to anc
from Des Moines gave the Republicai
campaign the first genuine impetus it
has received.
The handshake which A1 Smith be
stowed upon Gov. Roosevelt at the New
York Democratic convention has been
hailed by Democratic leaders as exactly
what was needed to bring the holdout
Smith followers into the Roosevelt
camp. They are hopeful, .however, that
Smith may speak for Roosevelt in order
to increase the likelihood of bringing to
Roosevelt the votes which four years
2?o went Democratic in South Philadel
phia. Pittsburgh, Erie and the coal
counties.
Democrats Claim Sections.
The Democratic leaders are claiming
Pittsburgh and some of the larger nor
mally Republican counties in the western
end of the State. Republican managers
contend that a number of sections, es
pecially in the anthracite region, which
went for Smith four years ago will give
Hoover majorities this year.
More cheerful confidence than has
been displayed since the conventions
was evident among Republican leaders
this week as they announced plans for
three weeks of intensive campaigning,
starting October 18. Economy, enforced
by smaller campaign funds, has neces
sitated a short, vigorous campaign.
Gen. Edward Martin, Republican
State chairman, predicted a 'normal
Republican majority" for the Hoover
Curtis ticket in Pennsylvania. The ma
jority. he said, probably will not reach
the 1,000.000 mark polled by Coolidge
in 1924 and Hoover in 1928, because
registrations are lower this year.
Grundy Joins Campaign.
Both parties concentrated on efforts
to bring the registration nearer maxi
mum figures today, the last registration
day in the cities. Although most of the
cities normally are heavily Republican,
the Democratic managers, as well as
the Republican, are expecting generous
support in the industrial centers this
year. The enrollments prior to today
were little better than half the 1928
totals.
Former Senator Joseph R. Grundy,
in other years active in campaigns and
a leader in collecting money for the
ticket, ended a year of political retire
ment Thursday to join the Republican
Executive Committee. The Grundy fac
tion, strong in many counties, had been
expected to be passive in the campaign
until its leader same into the open for
the Hoover ticket this week.
"HOOVER CARTS" APPEAR
AT CAROLINA RALLIES
Broken-Down Cars, Drawn by
Hules, Becoming: Democratic
Campaign Symbols.
BY ROBERT E. WILLIAMS.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
RALEIGH, N. C.. October 8—With
the Republican speaking campaign not
yet opened, "Hoover carts" have held
the center of the political stage in
North Carolina for the past few weeks.
It has now become a settled custom
for almost every Democratic speaking
rally to be featured by a parade of
these vehicles, which are made from
the chasses of automobiles which will
no longer run or for which the owner
cannot buy gasoline, and are drawn
by mules.
Josephus Daniels, former Secretary
of the Navy, drove a Hoover cart for a
mile this we:k at Smithfleld before de
livering the opening speech of the cam
paign in Johnston County, which for
the past 12 years has been carried by
the Republicans in every presidential
year, with the Democrats always win
ning in off years. This yearthe Demo
crats are claiming a majomy of 3,000,
about twice their normal figure. _
Backs Hoover
JOSEPH R. GRUNDY.
DEMOCRATS HOLD GAINS
MADE IN OHIO CAMPAIGN
Gov. White Shows Mo* Strength
in Contest With Ingalls—Thomas
Following Small.
BY J. H. GALBRAITR.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
COLUMBUS, Ohio. October 8 —Nor
man Thomas, Socialist candidate for
the presidency, is. not appealing to the
voters of this State, as was expected.
It was believed that Thomas would re
ceive the votes of many who. because
of dissatisfaction with the old parties,
would probably desert them. The in
dications now are that his vote will be
small.
Gov. Roosevelt is tightening his hold
upon the State. At the opening of
the campaign it looked as though he
might receive as much as 60 per cent
of the vote of the State, but now that
percentage has slowly but without va
riation increased to about 65 per cent.
Disregarding all the candidates but the
President and Gov. Roosevelt, the situ
ation in Ohio might be said to indicate
a result of two votes for Gov. Roose
velt to one for President Hoover.
Gov. George White, Democratic can
didate for re-election, has shown all
through the early weeks of the cam
paign that he was trailing his Repub
lican opponent, David S. Ingalls. but
lately he has been gaining ground,
and it was beginning to look as though
the Democrats might make a clean
sweep of the State ticket as well as the
national.
GOVERNOR'S CONTEST
STILL HOLDS TEXAS
Bitterness -of Ferguson-Sterling
Battle Endangers Candidacy
of National Ticket.
BY 8. RAYMOND BROOKS.
Special Diapatch to The Star.
AUSTIN, Tex., October 8.—Extensive
bolting of Mrs. Miriam A. Ferguson's
Democratic candidacy for Governor, as
sured by court decision Wednesday
abolishing Gov. Ross S. Sterling's con
test of her nomination, became a defi
nite challenge to Roosevelt and Garner
carrying Texas in the general election.
Meantime, a conflict between the
national campaign organization in
Texas, under direction of National
Committeeman Jed C. Adams, and the
pro-Ferguson Democratic State Execu
tive Committee, seeking to use the
national campaign to strengthen the
gubernatorial candidate, was partially
healed, but will contribute somewhat
to the Democratic bolter movement.
The Ferguson organization officially
claimed the right to run the national
campaign work in Texas.
A vigorous Republican campaign for
Governor, directed to dissatisfied Demo
crats. is being carried on by Orville
Bullington, nominee, backed by the
Republican party organization. Con
flict over the governorship far surpasses
in bitterness the partisanship for the
presidential elector ticket.
Altogether, a Democratic majority
for national candidates remained prob
able, but by no means certain, with
visible evidence of a bolter movement I
far more extensive than that preceding
the election four years ago when Texas
broke its straight Democratic reeord
and gave its votes to Présidait Hoover.
Declares He Will Discuss Na
tional Economic Situation
and State Issues.
BY T. R. EVANS.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
BOISE, Idaho. Octobcr 8.—"Big guns"
of the two major parties and a number
of minor parties are engaged ' In the
heavy bombardment which precedes the
election November 8.
Even Senator Borah may break the
silence maintained carefully throughout
the Summer. Borah will deliver two
addresses In Southern Idaho next week
in which he says he will discuss "the
economic situation of the Nation, along
with issues of the State campaign."
Just what part he expects to take in
the State and national campaigns, the
Senator would not say. Several weeks
ago Borah said he was interested prin
cipally in finding a solution to the Na
tion's economic problems and that "Oc
tober will be soon enough to start think
ing about politics." Borah's speeches
at Burley in South Central Idaho next
IMesday and at Malad in Southeastern
Idaho next Wednesday are being eagerly
awaited.
Borah's indorsement of John Thomas
for re-election to the United States Sen
ïte has materially strengthened Tnomas'
chances for success.
Mayor James P. Pope of Boise,
Thomas' Democratic opponent, is en
gaged in an active campaign. Pope is
winning support of the Democratic
forces and the discontended members
of the Republican party. His appar
ently increasing strength has aroused
the fears of Thomas' supporters.
The Republican press in Idaho lets
scarcely a day pass without linking the
name of Thomas with some problem of
more or less importance to some com
munity in the State. Desperate efforts
are being made to keep Thomas' name
before the people.
Thomas stopped a vicious punch this
week when organized labor in Idaho
refuted the published statement that
Idaho labor would support Thomas for
re-election.
This situation adds strength to the
Pope cause, since Pope a few days ago
called attention to the fact that Thomas
voted for confirmation of Judge John
T. Parker, despite the latter's attitude
toward labor.
Idaho Democrats have openly
charged Thomas with nepotism, a
charge which thus far has gone un
answered.
R. P. Parry, chairman of the Re
publican State Central Committee, ac
cuses Pope of attempting "to ride into
the Senate on the coat tail of Senator
Borah" to which Pope replied that "so
long as Senator Borah votes in behalf
of the common people, my vote will be
with his and Idaho will have two votes
right instead of one."
Silver and an elastic currency vies
with the liquor question as subjects for
political arguments between Mayor
Thomas Coffin of Pocatello. Democrat,
and Representative Addison T. Smith,
Republican, in the southern district, and
Compton I. White, Clarks Fork, Demo
crat, and Representative Burton L.
French, Moscow, Republican, in the
northern district.
For the first time. Idaho's compara
tively few voters have become vitally
important in the eyes of national cam
paign leaders of both parties.
Three presidential candidates have
visited Idaho in person—Franklin D.
Roosevelt. "Coin" Harvey and Norman
Thomas The Democrats sent Cornelius
Vanderbilt, jr., to Idaho where he de
livered a number of radio addresses on
Roosevelt's behalf. Patrick J. Hurley,
en route to Washington from Portland,
Oreg.. did his bit toward Hoover's cam
paign. Borah. Thomas. French and
Smith have returned to Idaho. A num
ber of lesser lights have visited the gem
State on behalf of numerous parties.
State committees of Republican. Demo
cratic. Socialist. Liberty and Communist
parties are hard at work.
BUSINESS MEN FAVOR
HOOVER IN MARYLAND
Workers, However, Make State
Doubtful With New Desire
for Change.
BY R. J. JACKSON.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
BALTIMORE. Md., October β.-Evi
dence that many of the more promi
nent business men of the city and State
of Maryland are sticking to President
Hoover as their best hope for economic
leadership has been given during the
past week.
Workers, on the other hand, almost
solidly seem to blame the President for
conditions causing lack of employment
and to demand a change in the White
House.
One of the political developments of
the week was formation of a Hoover
Business Men's League in Baltimore.
Its roster of officers and committees
includes many of the outstanding busi
ness and professional men of the city.
With Maryland a doubtful State,
many observers believe Ihe votes of
workers may snow under those of the
business executives in the November
balloting and cause the State to be car
ried by the Democratic ticket for the
first time in a national election since
1912.
Democratic leaders, with Gov. Ritchie
in the forefront, are putting on an ex
ceptionally vigorous campaign for their
national and local tickets.
United States Senator Millard E.
Tydings, Democrat, seeking re-election.
Is leveling sledge-hammer blows at the
Hoover economic policies in a tour of
Maryland counties. Roosevelt sentiment
is said to be very strong In the counties,
and this report is borne out by the
Democratic trend of registration, par
ticularly in heavily Republican Alle
gany County.
KILLS MAN* ENDS LIFE
Slayer Was Laid Off by Railway
Several Months Ago.
LOS ANGELES. October 8 f/PK—
Frank Matheson. 42. dining car inspec
tor for the Union Pacific Railroad, was
shot and killed today by Carl Hulting,
former Union Pacific employe, who
then shot himself to death, police re
ported.
Company officials said Hulting was
laid off several months ago because of
personnel reduction.
Germans Equip "Fair" Ship.
BERLIN </P).—The label "made In
Germany" is to be shown on far shores
in 1933 by a ship carrying samples of
everything manufactured in the Reich.
The vessel will head for South America,
then proceed to the Orient.
TREE
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Tree Expert Co.
Clnnin BO·. M7.
TRICKERY THREAT
IN MINNESOTA ENDS
Proposals for Mixed Party
Tickets Killed by Filing
Deadline.
I Spécial Dispatch to The 8t*r.
I ST. PAUL, Minn., October 8.—Threats
cf the Roosevelt forces to place a mixed
party ticket on the Minnesota ballots,
headed by Calvin Coolidge and Charles
G. Dawes, today forced abandonment
of the anti-Roosevelt proposal to file an
A1 Smith-Gov. Ely presidential ticket on
the State ballot.
As the last day for filing presidential
candidates by petition passed today, the
presidential and gubernatorial races nar
rowed down to contests free from the
political trickery which had been pro
posed by both sides of the election con
troversy, and the '"big guns" of both
national parties trained their Are on the
State and the crucial point of the
Northwest agricultural region, appar
ently Intent on fighting it out on the
main Issue.
I'phill Fight Faces G. O. P.
Despite the favorable reaction In
some sections to President Hoover's
Des Moines speech on agriculture, Re
publican party leaders admitted that
they have an uphill battle to carry the
State, and were further plagued by the
fact that Gov. Olson, the only third
party governor In America, in his
Farmer-Labor keynote speech frankly
declared himself for Franklin D. Roose
velt for President.
The plans of the Democratic antl
Roosevelt forces, which faction had
combined, according to popular re
port, with Hoover Republican forces
to place the A1 Smith-Ely pre<i
dential ticket in the field and had ob
tained the neces.'ary number of peti
tions, were disrupted completely by two
occurences. The reconciliation of
Smith and Roosevelt this week in 'lew
York's Democratic gubernatorial con
test and the obtaining of an equal num
ber of petition signatures by pro-Roose
velt Republicans and Farmer-Laborites
to place Coolidge and Dawes on the
ballot &s a counter-spilt effort.
Campaigners Assigned.
The Republicans are bringing into
the State as campaigners for President
Hoover, sfnator L. J. Dickinson. Ogden
L» Mills, Patrick J. Hurley, E. L.
Jahncke. Charles Francis Coe, author
and criminologist, and others of na
tional prominence.
The Democrats have booked Senator
Burton K. Wheeler of Montana for an
address here this month.
The Roosevelt forces have centered
their efforts on crystalizlng the liberal
vote of both Democratic and Farmer
Labor parties of the State upon their
presidential nominee, virtually effect
ing a fusion st> far as the national cam
paign goee And the Republicans are
devoting their campaign efforts to
swinging the normal Republican ma
jority of the State into line for Presi
dent Hoover and the State ticket head
ed by Earle Brown for Governor.
ELECTION LAW TANGLE
STIRS OLD DOMINION
Redisricting Act Hearing October
11 Delays Certification of Con
gress Candidates.
BY R. L. C. RARRET.
Special Dispatch to The Star
RICHMOND Va.. October 8—State
politics was stirred this week when
Joseph L. Crupper, Republican national
committeeman, asserted there could be
no legal election for members of Con
gress in Virginia this Fall because the
secretary of the Commonwealth would
not be able to certify to local electoral
boards the names of candidates at least
30 days before the election, as required
by law. because the Supreme Court of
Appeals will not pass upon the validity
of the State's redistricting act before
October 11. .
Peter Saunders, secretary of the Com
monwealth, sought an opinion on the
matter from John R. Saunders, at
torney general, who advised him he
was within his rights in delaying cer
tification until the Court of Appeals
decides the constitutionality of the
redistricting «et.
The main reason for delay in certifi
cation is that If the court holds the
act constitutional the names of can
didates for Congress will have to be
certified by districts, whereas if the act
is held unconstitutional the candidates
will have to be certified as running at
large.
MOSES FACES BATTLE
TO KEEP SENATE SEAT
Republicans Expect to Carry New
Hampshire, but by Reduced
Majority.
by j. j. McCarthy.
Special Dispatch to The 8tar.
MANCHESTER. Ν. H., October 8 —
With the election a month away both
Republican and Democratic candidates
are busy in their drive for votes in New
Hampshire. Despite the claims put
forth by the Democrats, political ob
servers throughout the State believe
that the Granite State will go Republic
an. but by a greatly reduced majority.
United States Senator George H.
Moses has a fight on his hands for re
election. The Senator is busy meeting
groups and addressing meetings in his
own behalf as well as the entire Re
publican ticket. His Democratic op
ponent, former Gov. Fred H. Brown,
one of the best vote getters the Demo
crats have, is conducting a quiet cam
paign and figures his strength In the
cities will give him an edge.
Henry T. Ledoux of Nashua, Demo
cratic candidate for Governor, is ex
pected to poll a large vote, but not large
enough to stop Gov. John G. Winant
fiom being re-elected.
Β
$
EXCURSION
NORTH
CAROLINA
OCTOBER 22nd
RALEIGH
HAMLET
MONROE
CHARLOTTE
Also all Intermediate point»—
Ratrace cheeked
Limit Midnight. October £4
Reduced Sound Trip PULLMAN
Ticket» honored on regular trains
9:05 a.m.. «:W. β: 4« and 11 :.■»·» p.m.
Also 11:59 p.m. ·( October 'lit
REDUCED ROUND TRIP FARES
ALL POINTS
SOUTH
Oct. 27, 28 and Not. 5, β, 7
1.1-Day Limit
Fares to Several Points:
MIAMI *48.74
ST. PETERSBURG 40.5Λ
JACKSONVILLE 31.M
SAVANNAH 14.47
ATLANTA «.17
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Reduced Round Trip Pullman
Make Pullman Reservations Early
City Ticket Offlce— 714 14th St. N.W.
Phone NAt. «37 or
Union Station
SEABOARD
AIR LINK RAILWAY
END OF SMITH-ROOSEVELT FEUD
OFFSETS G. 0. P. ILLINOIS GAINS
Hoover Backers Receive Encouragement
From Des Moines Address, tut Rival
Makes Strides in Chicago.
BY V. Y. DALLMAN.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
SPRINGFIELD. 111.. October 8 —The
Des Moines address of President Hoover
has encouraged many frightened Re
I publicans in this State.
A hasty aurvey does not, however,
disclose any definite reason why Demo
cratic leaden should modify their claims
of a victory for Gov. Roosevelt In Illi
nois. Authorities claim that what ad
vantage President Hoover gained in his
address lu Des Moines is more than off
set by the reconciliation of Gov. Roose
velt and former Gov. A1 Smith.
Republican leaders down-State find no
little comfort in the vast audiences
which are attending the Republican
rallies addressed by United States Sena
tor Otis F. Glenn on behalf of President
Hoover and by former Gov. Len Small
on behalf of himself as the Republican
candidate for Governor. Senator Glenn's
defense of President Hoover's policies
has undoutedly found greater favor
since the President himself devoted the
major portion of his Des Moines address
to economic policies in general and the
plight of the farmer in particular.
In the dry areas down-State the Presi
dent's careful avoidance of that con
troversy in his Des Moines address has
been helpful υ him.
The offset of the drama staged by
Gov. Roosevelt and A1 Smith is prin
cipally in Chicago. President Hoover's
address is said to have fallen on deaf
ears in the metropolitan area where the
wet and dry Issue is paramount. Gov.
Roosevelt has gained tremendous
strength in Chicago because of hie re
cent visit there. 1
Illinois Démocrate have been suc
cessful In maintaining a greater degree
of harmony than their Republican op
ponents. There le an undercurrent of
district between certain down-State
Democratic groups and the Cermalc
controlled organisation In Chicago rel
ative to patronage possibilities In the
event that Gov. Roosevelt Is elected
President and. Judge Henry Horner of
Chicago is elected Democratic Gover
nor. Len Small's lieutenants are try
ing to fan these smoldering embers
into a conflagration by charging that
Mayor Cermak will control both Cook
County and down-State and build up a
one-man political empire unparalleled
in Illinois.
Democrats reply to theee attacks by
saying that Judge Horner Is above re
proach.
There Is a degTee of harmony, su
perficially at least. In Republican lead
ership in Illinois. Former Gov. Yatee
of Springfield, dry. is campaigning with
Senator Glenn and Small, wets. Gov.
L. L. Emmerson is taking no active
part in the campaign, but attended a
State meeting in Springfield recently
and occupied a seat in the audience
while Glenn, Yates and Small were
speaking. After the.t he departed for
a visit in the North, saying it Is for the
benefit of his health.
Undpr the surface the Small and
anti-Small animosities remain as deep
and bitter as ever. Some of Small's
lieutenants continue to flirt with Roose
velt Democrats who are considered
anti-Cermak and who are wobbly In
their support of Judge Homer on Cer
mak's account.
NEW JERSEY APATHETIC
TOWARD NATIONAL RACE
Chief Interest in State at Present
Centers on Barbour-Stewart
Contest fer Senate.
BV EDWARD M. Oil.ROY.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
TRENTON. Ν J.. October 8 —New
Jersey Is still in the throes of the dull
est presidential campaign in many years.
There is little enthusiasm for President
Hoover except among the professional
politicians, while in only a few south
ern rural counties has Gov. Roosevelt
a personal following.
Business conditions, of course, mili
tate against the Republican ticket, and
party workers so far have been more
concerned with their local candidates
than in success of the national ticket. I
Republican financial pledges have been
more generous than anticipated.
The Republican campaign has been
apathetic, as the State organization
went to pieces after the defeat last year
of the entire ticket. Only arrival of
Ambassador Walter E. Edge to take
charge of the Hoover campaign prom
ises any intensive campaigning.
Prank Hague of Jersey City has re
turned from Europe and the Demo- l
cratic organization work is progressing
smoothly and is certain to produce to
its capacity. However, there seems lit
tle enthusiasm for the Democratic party
among the rank and file of voters not
closely affiliated with the organization.
Chief interest should center in the
election of a United States Senator,
since control of the Senate for the
Winter short term probably will hinge
on this election. W. Warren Barbour.
Republican Senator by appointment, is
I seeking election. He is opposed by Rep- i
j resentative Percy H. Stewart, but the
voters refuse to get excited.
A girl who has completed nine years' I
perfect attendance at a Motherwell.
Scotland, schcol has been refused an
1 award, the director of education claim
ing that the regulations provide only for
presents for pupils completing five years'
I p;rfect attendance.
ι
DIVORCE SUIT SECOND
Daughter of Poet Edgar Let Mas
ters Again Applicant.
CHICAGO. October 8 (/TV—Mrs.
Marcia M. Jennings, daughter of Edgar
Lee Masters, the poet, filed suit today
to divorce Malcolm A. Jennings for the
second time.
Their first marriage lasted five
months, but the first divorce lasted only
one month.
Chronology: Wed July β. 1930: di
vorced December 4. 1930: remarried
January 4. 1931: separated last March.
Today's bill alleged that Jennings, vice
president of an advertising company,
struck his wife twice after they sep
arated. She asked custody of Marcia,
10 months old.
REPUBLICAN HOPES
BOOM IN MISSOURI
Hoover Speech at Des Moines
Puts New Life in G. 0. P. .
of Neighbor State.
BY GEORGE K. WALLACE.
Special Dispatch to The Star.
KANSAS CITT, Mo, October 8 —
ι Republican hopes for holding Missouri
ι In the G. O. P. column this year, which
so far in the campaign have been none
too bright, this week took an upward
bound following the speech of President
Hoover In Des Moines.
The presence and words of the Chief
Executive in Iowa brought cheer and
lew life to the Republican fold through
out Missouri. A caravan of several
hundred Missouri motor cars made the
trip to Des Moines to whoop thing* up
for the President. Despite their en
counter with striking farmers who tore
Hoover banners from cars, the Repub
licans returned home and since have
> been busy radiating a new enthusiasm
In the party's ranks, which Is *sam
lng itself on all sides.
Noticed in Kansaa City.
Particularly, has this proved true In
the highly organlaed Democratic center
of Kansas City, where the G. Ο P. has
I fared badly in recent elections Kansas
I City watched and listened to President
Hoover's pronouncements with unusual
Interest because of the big grain and
live stock industry which centers in
this market.
Republican leaders of the State are
■ convinced that the President's refer
I ences in regard to the agricultural
problem left a favorable impression and
iemonstrated the Chief Executive's con
cern over this subject which is rocking
the countryside in these parts. More
over, the G. O. P. chieftains reflect the
opinion that the Iowa speech in Its en
tirety especially appealed to business
interests and in numerous cases drove
back to the Republican fold the
wavering.
Have Hard Task.
Also adding to the buoyancy of the
G. O. P. was the visit to Missouri this
week of Vice President Curtis, who. at
a big rally, opened the Republican
campaign in Kansas City and spoke at
several points in the farming section
in the north part of the State.
Although the G. O. P.. in control of
the State the last 12 years, is in a
much better frame of mind and is
getting its organization operating much
smoother than 10 days ago. the Re
publicans plainly have a real task on
their hands if they are to hold Missouri
this year.
NEW HOMES
of Architectural and
Structural Perfection!
Exhibit Home TliAc Immaculate, complet*, up·
to-the-mlnute home* are the
232 flneet ▼on have seen at the price.
n\TFFI I Π\Ι' 7 Urf* roolM: tor*f' two-tone
' bathe; ultra modern kitcheni;
ST. N.W. screened throughout. Built-in
S«ra*e.
Open Daily Until 9 P.M.
FLOYD E. DAVIS CO.
Realtor«
733 12th St. N.W. NAt. 0352
618 12th HORNING 618 12th
Those who buy judiciously arc
making today's diminished incomes
buy even more than they were able
to buy two or three years ago.
Those who buy diamonds or silver,
are buying much, much more, be
cause two years ago . . . even one
year ago there was no Horning
store in Washington. You too will
find Homing's prices on the finest
diamonds and jewelry are even low
er than the prevailing low prices of
todav.
BRIDES must
have DIAMONDS and SILVER
(A) STERUNG SALT AND
PEPPER, pr
(B) STERLING COASTER
SET
(C) STERUNG CONSOLE
CANDLE STICKS, pr.
$5.00
$5.00
$3.75
(E) DIAMOND WEDDING
BAND
Channel-aet, complet· eircl·, in
10 p«r cent Iridium Platinum.
*49-50
(F) DIAMOND SOLITAIRE... %tA(\
72-100 earat diamond, white I \J
1 m a. t _ λ m ι. (.{&. IJ
$297i
(D) STERUNG SILVER
COMPOTE
*3
and perfeet In 11-k. whit· gold.
DIAMOND SOLITAIRES
17-100 whit· perfect diamond·
in 11-k. whit· gold mounting·.
.00
WHITE GOLD WEDDING RINGS Λ
$ς.οο
18-kt. gold, beautifully carved. J
STERLING FLATWARE
FAIRFAX-MINUET-ORCHID-BALTIMORE ROSE
Guaranteed
Jewelry
and Watch
Repairing
Six-Eighteen Twelfth St.
V
Between F and C
Listen to
'Melodic Jewels'
5:45 Today
Station WRC

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