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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 14, 1935, Image 40

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1935-03-14/ed-1/seq-40/

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SQUALID CAPITAL
OF WSRECALLED
Civil War Resident Amazed
by Changes in Recent
Years.
Washington at the beginning of the
Civil War was "a squalid, unattrac
tive, Insanitary country town infested
by malaria, mosquitoes, cockroaches,
bed bugs, lice and outdoor backhouses
εηα secessionists, surface drainage,
muddy or dusty streets, stirred up by
soldiers marching through and camp
ing In public buildings, and no end
of houses of ill fame," the Fine Arts
Commission has been informed by a
veteran telegraph operator, now living
in Maine.
Thomas H. Sherman of Gorham,
Me., recently was looking through the
pages ot the National Geographic
Magazine and admiring the photo
graphs of the new Washington. Re
calling the city as he saw it as a
young man, from the beginning ot the
Civil War until 1889. he noted the
"vast improvements in architecture
and beautifiration of the surface." He
was moved to write Chairman Charles
Moore about it and contrast the
Washington of his day with the fast
rising metropolis of today.
Van Ness Mansion.
"For instance, southwest of the
White House a large tract reaching to
the Potomac was sparsely covered.''
iaid Mr Sherman. "The only ouild
ings that I recall were small struc
tures connected with the old canal
and the rough cottage of the man
(Burns?) who sold to Washington a
large section of the site for the city,
tnd a fine mansion nearby it built by
Van Ness, a member of Congress trom
New York, who married Burns'
daughter, a belle of that day. One of
Booth's schemes at first was to kid
nap the President and secrete him in
this mansion, as probably you know.
"On Meridian Hill just north of
the city boundary stood a large water
itandpipe near where I bought some
house lots. Ov'er this hill, just west
of Sixteenth street, X think I locate
the Walter Reed Hospital. I cannot j
place the Cathedral, for 'Mount St. [
Alban' seems new to me.
Penitentiary Site.
"The War College I seem to see on i
the site of the old penitentiary (?) in
Which the assassins were tried.
"There are other spots that puzzle j
me, but these mentioned are most in- 1
teresting.''
The veteran telegrapher told Chair- j
man Moore that he was called to Wash- !
lngton at the oeginning of the war.
"It took two days and more to get
there from Bangor by fastest routes
with seven or eight changes from train
to bus, 10 ferries, to trains," he wrote.
Washington of that day he found
far from the "city of my dream "
"Perhaps there are but a few who
saw Lincoln 'close-up' as I saw him, |
and who sat in the theater the night
of the assassination," he observed.
Mr. Sherman asks the Fine Arts
Commission to send him a detailed
map of vhe city so that he may com- !
pare the metropolis of today with that j
of his vouth. The commission pro- '
poses to grant tnis wish.
TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL
IS 90 PER CENT OCCUPIED
133 Cared For at Glenn Dale in
February, Dr. D. L. Finucane
Tells Welfare Board.
At the beginning of this month the
Children's Tuberculosis Sanatorium at
Glenn Dale. Md„ was occupied to 90
per cent of its capacity, according to a
report yesterday to the Board of Pub
lic Welfare by Dr. Daniel Leo Finu
cane.
He said the facilities for white boys
were 97.3 per cent occupied, for white
girls 94.7 per cent, for colored boys
83.7 per cent, and for colored girls
86.4 per cent.
The average number of patients
eared for during February 133, as
Compared with 128„in January.
The institution was opened last !
September and construction of addi
tions to this building now are under
way.
ALUMNI OFFER LOANS
Euke TJ. Group Sets Up $200
Fund to Aid Washingtonians.
The Duke University Alumni Asso
ciation of Washington has set up a
loan fund of $200 to help Washington
atudents who hope to attend Duke, it
was announced yesterday by Miss
Jane Elizabeth Newton, president
The fund is to be perpetuated and will
be available year after year.
Last October the association offered
two $100 scholarships that were won
by Charles C, Stauffer and Robert S.
Doyle, both freshmen at Duke now.
Bonn Gilbert, also of Washington, and
a senior at Duke, is another recipient
of a loan from the Washington
alumni.
Hing Found After 33 Years.
Thirty-three years ago. while play
ing with her two children on a swing
close to an old apple tree outside
her Denbigh home, Mrs. Evans, now
of Colwyn, England, lost her wedding
ring. The other day the tree was
blown down, and, while it was being
removed, the ring dropped from a
«mall hole at the base.
230 Seek Three Jobs.
For three positions of stenographers
ftt central police office of Dundee,
Scotland. 230 applications from men
have been received.
QUICK RELIEF FROM
CONSTIPATION
That is the joyful cry of thousands
since Dr. Edwards produced Olive
Tablets, the substitute for calomel.
Dr. Edwards, a practicing physi
cian for 20 years, and calomel's old
time enemy, discovered the formula
for Olive Tablets while treating pa
tients for chronic constipation.
. Olive Tablets do not contain calo
mel, just a healing, soothing vegetable
laxative safe and pleasant
No griping Is the "keynote" of these
little sugar-coated, olive-colored tab
lets. They help cause the bowels to
act normally. They never force them
to unnatural action.
If you have a "dark brown mouth"
—bad breath—a dull, tired feeling—
•ick headache caused by constipation
—you should find quick, sure and
pleasant results from one or two of
Dr. Edwards Olive Tablets.
Thousands take them to keep right.
Trjr them. 15c, 20c, 60c.
THE HECHT CO. '
{tit niι
G Ο,Ο D TIME TO OPEN A CHARGE ACCOU NT
°q c e
Girls' & Jr. Hi
BLOUSES
84e
Silk crepes and rayon taf
fetas. Sizes 10 to 16 In
plain colors, plaids and
checks.
(Second Floor)
Girls' & Jr. Hi
SKIRTS
1
.55
Good looking 4-Kore and
pleated skirts In flannel or
Nub tweed. Sties 10 to 18.
Several colors.
(Second Floor)
Girls' Pleated
SKIRTS
1.55
Bodice-top styles In plain
or pl»id wool crepes. Slîes
7 to 12, In navy, *reen.
brown and wine.
(Second Floor)
Print & Plain
Crepe Frocks
ι
.74
Many new styles. Includ
ing boleros and jackets in
all the wanted Sprint
colors. 7 to 10 and f*
to 14.
(Second Floor)
Jr. Hi Girls'
COATS
8
.84
Diagonal tweeds, mono
tones and basketweaves In
smart English styles. Sizes
7 to 16.
(Second Floor)
Bro. & Sis.
COAT SETS
4-69
Tweeds, wool cheviots and
checks In a wide assort
ment of styles. All with
hats to match. Sizes J
to 6.
(Second Floor)
Tots' Sample
DRESSES
88
Higher-priced sheer prints,
organdies, dimities and
hanky lawns in sizes 1 to
3 and Π to β.
(Second Floor)
"Quick'' Sell-Help
UNDIES
48
With lastex back-band the
youngster can "manipu
late." For girla 2 to 12
and boys 2 to 10.
(Second Floor)
Tots' Flannel
COAT SETS
2
.69
Samples. Tailored and
dressy styles (or girls and
boys 1 to 8. All with be
rets or bonnets.
(Second Floor)
Tots' Silk
DRESSES
1
.59
Perky little prints and
plain colored frocks for
8arty and dreu-up wear,
lies 2 to β.
(Second Floor)
â
4 important types of
BETTER SUITS
Gmmdiow 01 ΤΛ
w&v* AY
Big values in thre<c-piere topcoat suits. Finger
lip jacket suits. Three-quarter swagger suits.
Softly tailored dressmaker suits. All carefully
tailored of men's wear, tweeds or new diagonal
and blistered woolens. AH silk lined. Siies
12 to 20, 38 to 41, 33'/i to 43',^.
(Suit Shop, Third Floor The Hecbt Co.)
Print Jacket & Redingote
BETTER DRESSES
1*5
The pick of smart Spring styles for daytime—
every one a grand Anniversary bargain! Sheer
and printed frocks with matching jackets . . .
one-piece prints . . . redingotes with full-length
coats o\er plain or printed frocks. Sizes for
misses, women and little women.
(Bitter Dres» Shop. Third Floor. The Hecht Co.)
Preciously Furred & "Sample"
SPRING COATS
ίwnwvdwf Ο Τ 74
"VSWv&y* Ζ/
Even the important detachable Regency cape
collar of fur is included at thij low price! The
new "Halo"' collar, the furred cuff coat! Rip
pling, fur edged revers. Excellent fabrics!
Furs such as Kolinsky. Galyafc. Squirrel, Azure
Wolf! Sizes 14 to 20, 38 to 46, 35',2 to 45Vi·
(Coat Shop. Third Floor. The Hecht Co.)
(ûnnwvuw/ χ j .
W%" ν v
Rough and Smooth
STRAW HATS
Sailors, brims, off-the-fare C
styles, berets and Breton's # /
in blark navy, brown and
Opry bright Spring shade.
(Third Floor. The Hecht CO.>
Jr. Miss Wool Coat
REDINGOTES
A full-length, unlincd wool
coat. Λ harmonizing,
plain or printed crepe
frock. Navy, black or
brown. 11 to 17.
(Young Washingtonlan Shop. Third Floor.)
11.00
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2
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£
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Junior Miss Furred
SPRING COATS
Attached ami detachable
fur capes. Fur cuffs!
Fluffy furs! Silk lined!
Navy, dawn, hrown or
black. 11 to 17.
(Young Washingtonlan Shop, Third Floor.)
1955
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*β&άûuq*
White Swann
UNIFORMS
] 59
Blue, green or black broadcloth
for the well-dressed maid. Pre·
shrunk white poplin for the ipic
and «pan nurse. Long and short
sleeved style*. Sizes 14 to 46.
Third Ποογ, The Hecht Co.)
à
Kid or Washable
Capeskin Gloves
Ci/nnivVUaMj
*i
"J .29
Grand values in Spring*· smartest gloves!
Sleekly fitting kidskin* in classic pull-on style.
Novelty cyff and plain styles, in capeskin.
Beige, black, hrown, gray or eggshell in the
group.
(Main Floor The Hecht Co.)
A

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