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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 28, 1936, Image 6

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EVERY GUEST
A KING * * *
.■The Taft accords you a royal
; welcome, and noble service.
MM ROOMS Wire RATH, fROM *Z JO
IBS RT Witt OR MONTH
HOTEL Alfred Lbw,s> Mt?r
TAPT
SUS NEW YORK
1 REDUCED PRICES ~
On Small Lots of
LUMBER
You won't want to miss this
big money-saving opportunity to
buy small lots of lumber for re
pairs or remodeling.
We've reduced prices on fin
ished lumber, plywood, celotex.
flooring, etc. Spring is but two
months off—if you're planning
repairs about the house at that
time why not buy your materials
NOW at reduced prices? Free
delivery.
Knotty Pine Panelling
6c Sq- Ft
Just what you want for
recreation rooms, play
rooms, etc. A really fine
panelling. ,
f ELLY
E Lumber and Millwork
m 2121 Ga. Are.
m N Orth 1341_
You’ve never seen these
in any other razor
y •
contains the blades... sealed in a
bath of oil! Schick blades are ac
tually twice as thick as most
...able to take a sharper
edge—and hold it. They are
tndividuallyhoned,stropped
and inspected.
\
LOADS LIKE AN AUTOMATIC!
When e fresh blade is needed, you
insert Injector into razor heaif...
it shoots out the old blade, shoots
in a new one... in a split second!
Blade edge is never touched until
it hits your whiskers. No unwrap
ping, twisting, screwing or reas
sembling.
THIS IS THE WAY
THE GUIDE BAR
runs ahead of the
blade, smoothing and
flattening the skin ...
not grooving it as
combing"teeth”edges do.Stretches
skin taut, just before blade touches
it—prevents nicks and scrapes.
COMPARATIVE SIZE OP
OTHER RAZOR HEADS
AH© THE
Infect©*'RAZOR HEAD
TRIM, COMPACT HEAD...half
the size of other razor heads, yet
shaves as wide an area. Gets right
into those hard-to-shave spots!
A.
WELLS RE-ELECTED
Silver Beaver Awards Are
Made at Meeting of Dis
trict Council.
Capt. Chester Wells was re-elected
president of the District of Columbia
Council, Boy Scouts of America, yes
terday at the Willard Hotel.
Other officers re-elected were Paul
Bartsch, Julius Garftnckel and
Samuel H. KaufTmann, vice presi
dents; George Hewitt Myers and
Ernest H. Daniel, treasurer and as
sistant treasurer, respectively, and Dr.
Camp Stanley, commissioner.
Thirteen other members of the ex
ecutive board were re-elected, as fol
lows:
Henry P. Blair. Harold C. Bryant,
Karl W. Corby, George E. Hamilton,
Jack Gates. George E. Hamilton, jr.;
Arthur Hellen, Arthur J. May, Walter
H. Merrill. L. Corrin Strong. R. A.
Van Orsdel, Morton H. Wilner and
Lester G. Wilson.
Pour new members were also elect
ed to the board: Rev. Arthur P. Wilson,
David E. McCoy, William B. Willard
and Carlile Bolton Smith.
The guest of honor was Rev. Arthur
P. Wilson, pastor of Columbia Heights
Christian Church, who spoke of his
experience in scouting under thiee
flags.
Silver Beaver Awards.
The Silver Beaver award was be
stowed on four local Scouters. This
award is made by the National Boy
Scout Council, on recommendation of
the local council, in recognition of
noteworthy service of exceptional char
acter to boyhood by registered Scout
ers within the territory under the
jurisdiction of a local council. This
year’s recipients are:
Julius Garfinckel, department store
proprietor, who was elected to the
board in 1924 and has been vice presi
dent of the council since 1925.
William Thomas McClosky, scout
master since 1926, who has served as
commissioner for the District Council
and acting chairman of the Council
Training Committee.
Louis Beecher Grening. Scoutmaster
of Troop 43 since 1925 and former
Scoutmaster of Troop 15.
Virgil Eld ward Howard, Scoutmaster
of Troop 12 and former assistant
Scoutmaster of Troop 5 in Kansas
City.
Additions to Rolls.
Thirty-three new units of Scouts
and Cubs were added to the rolls
during the year, Scout Executive Linn
C. Drake reported, but it was neces
sary to separate 24 units, leaving a
net increase of nine—six of which
were Cub packs. The Council at the
end of last month included 167 Scout
units and 24 Cub packs, having a
combined membership of 4.431 boys.
Dean Henry P. Blair announced the
organization of a University of Scout
ing. which will open February 11. The
institution will offer 16 courses in
Scouting and related subjects.
Activities for the 26th anniversary
week. February 7 to 13, will include
troop celebrations and “old-timers’
night” in the individual troop head
quarters on February 7, it was an
nounced by Comdr. M. W. Willard,
District commissioner of the Potomac
Division. A pageant depicting the j
history and program of Scouting will i
be presented in Constitution Hall on
February >.
Boxing in Hawaii.
Hawaii has a boxing commission
among her official territorial depart
ments.
Romance in W. P, A. Files
When Miss Jane Gosling, daughter of Dr. Thomas W. Gosling, 3311
Cathedral avenue, national director of the Junior Red Cross, obtained a
job in the Works Progress Administration, she thought only of con
tributing her bit to the working out of the Ne'v Deal program. She took
charge of the master files of presidential correspondence in connection
with the W. P. A. program at the Washington Auditorium and there met
George Hardy, 1865 Kalorama road, a fellow New Dealer. Their engage
ment has been announced. The photographer dragged them away from
the W. P. A. files for this photograph. —Star Staff Photo.
MRS. Pins IS SUED
FOR STOCK PAYMENT
Bank Attorney Seeks $19,530
as 100 Per Cent Assess
ment on Shares.
Mrs. Gladys Pitts, wife of T. Bryan
Pitts, former chairman of the board of
the defunct F. H. Smith Co., was sued
for $19,530 in Frederick County Circuit
Court at Frederick yesterday by at
torney for the old Federal-Americpn
National Bank & Trust Co. The suit
was to collect a 100 per cent assess
ment on 900 shares of the defunct
bank's stock, together with interest.
The suit was filed in the same court
where Mrs. Pitts last December brought
a $250,000 suit against Emory L. Cob
lentz, in which she alleged that the
Frederick County banker owed her
that amount on a note he gave her
husband. Pitts nowT is serving a sen
tence for embezzlement, and Mrs. Pitts
is believed to be a resident of Milwau
kee, Wis.
A writ of attachment Issued under
the bank's suit against Mrs. Pitts was
ordered placed in the hands of Cob
lentz. This was done, according to
B. H. Conn of Washington, attorney
for the bank, in an effort to collect
from the non-resident of Maryland in
event the court awards her a judg
ment against Coblentz.
In her recent suit Mrs. Pitts, the
Associated Press reported, stated her
husband had indorsed to her a $147,440
promissory note signed by Coblentz.
The plaintiff asked interest as of De
cember, 1929.
STEAMSHIPS.
BERMUDA-VIA FURNESS. $50 un7round
trip with private bath Frequent aailinas
direct to dock at Hamilton Fumes* Her
muda Line. 34 Whitehall St New York.
RITES AT FORT MYER
FOR CAPT. J. M. EVANS
Army Officer's Burial Will Be at
Arlington—Died Sunday
at Walter Reed.
Funeral services for Capt. John M.
Evans. Infantry, U. S. A., who was
j detailed to duty with the Finance De
; partment, were to be held at 2 p.m.
j today in the Fort Myer chapel, with
Chaplain Ralph C. Delbert officiating.
! Burial will be in Arlington Cemetery,
| with full military honors at the grave.
Honorary pall bearers will be Lieut,
j Ool. Gladeon M. Barnes. Capts. Theo
dore A. Baumeister, Emmett J. Bean,
| Mitchell A. Giddens and Stewart W.
| Tow'le, Jr., and Dr. Charles E. Kellogg.
Capt. Evans died in Walter Reed
' Hospital Sunday. He was born in
Manila, P. I., January 29. 1904. He
! was appointed a second lieutenant,
Officers' Reserve Corps, June 29, 1925,
I and the following day named second
j lieutenant in the Regular Army, into
which he was accepted the following
September. He was promoted to first
lieutenant August 1, 1931, and to cap
: tain August 1, 1935.
-•
Knutson Not Senate Candidate.
Representative Knutson of Min
nesota, continuously a member of the
House for 20 years, announced to
day he has decided not to be a candi
date to succeed the late Senator
Sch&ll.
TRUNKS—'*25*
Repairing of Leather Good*
G. W. King,Jr. 51111th St. N.W.
YOU'RE LUCKY YOU UVE IN WASHINGTON!
If you lived in Philadelphia, for instance, it would cost you #2.00 to get j
the Deluxe Model of the Schick Injector Razor. For a strictly limited
time, Washingtonians (and those who live in the close vicinity) can get a
SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY KIT
SCHICK
Injectoi*
t
including
12 blades
{net the usual
1,2 or 5
blades')
EXACTLY THE SAME AAZOA AS |
NOW SOLO IN THE tZOO KtT |
ONLY A FEW THOUSAND of these Introductory Kits have been produced. Your city
has been chosen for the offer. For a strictly limited time this complete kit—razor and 12
blades—will cost you much leu than the razor alone sells for all over the United States. j
You have read, or heard, of how this new razor is sweeping the country. Thousands j
of enthusiastic users are spreading the word—telling of an entirely new shaving sensation. I
Get yourself one of these 89c Introductory Kits while the supply lasts. Only a limited
quantity has been allowed each dealer. The offer will not be repeated. When this test
selling campaign ends, the regular price, $2.00, will be charged for the Deluxe Model Kit.
I
“"“Injectoi* ,A'°*
THE RAZOR YOUR FRIENDS ARE TALKING ABOUT
a sk T
RUTH M. STAUFFER
English Department Head
Is Selected From Teach
ing Staff.
Miss Ruth M, Stauffer, teacher of
English at McKinley High School, yes
terday was promoted to be head of the
English department of the public
schools at a special meeting of the
Board of Education.
Miss Stauffer succeeds to the posi
tion formerly held by Miss Sarah E.
Simons, who retired January 1 after
more than 50 years’ service as a teach
er and supervisor here.
At the same time four vacancies
were filled in the faculty staff at Wil
son Teachers’ College. W. W. Cruze
was named an assistant professor;
Miss E. M.. Andrews was promoted
from critic teacher to assistant in
Sinn . l«i.. O T nm.
moted from a teacher at the Cranch
School to primary critic teachpr, and
Mrs. R. K. Webb was promoted from
teacher at the Hardy School to critic
teacher to take the place of M. B.
Bish, who is on leave.
The appointment of Miss Stauffer
to head the English department came
as a complete surprise to those who
had interpreted a remark of Dr. FraWk
W. Ballou, superintendent, last Wed
nesday to mean that an ‘'outsider”
would be brought in for the past.
Dr. Ballou asserted then that among
the applicants already in the school
system none had "supervisory experi
ence,” If that was to be made a pre
requisite for the position. What he
meant was that except for that ex
perience there were available teachers
with all other necessary qualifications.
At the same time he presented a list
of all appointees to administrative
and supervisory positions between July
1, 1920, and January 1. 1936. which
showed that out of a total of 214 such
appointments, 191 were persons al
ready in the school system and only
23 were employed from outside. It
was pointed out by members of the
! board that some of the 23 "outsiders”
j were Washington residents at the time
they were appointed.
Dr. Ballou also pointed out policies
■ 11 — ~ 1
Thi Sew Sortheast Branch But’.dtnp
American Security C” Trust Company
Ltfhth and H Streets, S. £•
Gets School Post
TEACHER GIVES UP POST
ANC JOINS C. C. C. CAMP
dan Who Taught Pupils George
Washington “Rran Around With
Women” Resigns.
3y the Associated Press.
OKLAHOMA CITY, January 28.—
K country school teacher accused of
picturing George Washington to the
pupils as a man who “ran around
with women" has given up his post
and Joined a C. C. C camp, Jim
Warrant, county school superintendent
said yesterday.
Irate parents also had accused the
teacher, Henry Plog, of instructing
their children in the “Love Life of
Toads,’’ a subject which they said
was too advanced for the pupils.
Last Fall, Plog succeeded by court
action in holding his position, but
MISS RUTH M. STAlIrFER.
—Star Staff Photo. |
---I
adopted by the Board of Education
as far back as 1924 giving preference
to teachers already in service when
new appointments are to be made.
-.
Medical service by airplane has been
inaugurated in White Russia.
PORTER SERVICE- HEATED BUSES
• Have money!—
Bargain fare* to ,
most, point«in the
U.H. or Canada.
Ask about special
found trip fares.
EXAMPLES OF
BARGAIN BUS
FARES
Chicago $14.50
New York..- 5-50
Pittsburgh . 6.50
Los Angeles, 36.00
Phone District S600
in ANNAPOLIS HOTEL
A
NEIGHBORHOOD
EVENT
You are cordially invited to attend the
opening of our new Northeast Branch
RESIDENTS and business men of Wash- ... And there is a large Ladies’Room, ad
ington will be welcomed at the formal joining a special group of tellers'windows,
opening of American Security's enlarged We want to acknowledge here our in*
and improved Northeast Branch on Wed- debtedness to the loyal depositors, cus*
nesday and Thursday, January 29 and 30. tomers and friends who have made this
When you attend our opening you will growth possible, and to thank them for
find the Northeast Branch has been more their patronage and confidence,
than doubled in size to keep pace with It will be a privilege for us to meet our
our increasing service to the c&mmunity customers and friends on this occasion and
• •. Our new vault has twice the capacity show them through the modern bank they
of the old one ... All new equipment is of have helped to build. We hope to see you
the latest design ... The new alarm sys- on Wednesday or Thursday. The building
tem is an education in modern protection will be open on these days until 9 P. M.
AMERICAN SECURITY
AND TRUST COMPANY
- Largest Capital and Surplus of any Washington Trust Company
. Main Office: fifteenth street and Pennsylvania ave.
CRNTRAI, BRANCH IOUTHWEST BRANCH
7th and Massachusetts Ave., N. W. Seventh and E Streets, S. W.
NORTHEAST BRANCH NORTHWEST BRANCH
Eighth and H Streets, N. E.. 1140 Fifteenth Street, N. W.
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Member Federal Reserve System
angry parents made a stormy scene
or the opening day at School."
Warram said he was told by Ben
Koelsch, director of the Carey school
district, west of Oklahoma City, that
Plog had submitted his res.gnation
to join the camp at Nowata.
PuDWeSSre' PAY DAY SALE I
J§ Extra Specials for Wednesday and Thursday ffg
Lean Skinned Smoked AJ.
Hams, whole or half, lb. »®IG
Sliced Ham, Center Cut,
Small Smoked I A.
Shoulders, lb._ I wC
STEAKS, 99|*
Round or Sirloin, lb. __ nW
Lean Pork Chops, I ft _
lb. _ I SIC
Loin Pork Roast, | A.
lb. .... IwC
Fresh Shoulders, I A_
small and lean, lb_ I OG
Breast Lamb, I I _
lb. IIC
Shoulder Lamb, I4c
.17c
Fresh Pork Livers, I4c
Shoulder Spareribs, A.
lb.. 9C
3 lbs.. 25c
k“;; 31 10c
Kidwell's Coffee. Famous I J] -
Cut Price Brand, lb.... I "f G
SUGAR, JE3*
Extra Special, lb. ■§4C
RIPE TOMATOES, Q_
pt. box _ . OC
Fla. Oranges, extra I Q_
Igc.. big value, doz. I w»
Bean Pork, I4c
Green Kale, 4e
Green Cabbage,
lb. HC
No 1 Irish I A |bs A I p
Potatoes. Ill £ I If
Swet A ibs. inc
Fanrv 3 ibs. l Or
Onions ._ V I UU
Sliced Bologna, I B
Finest Quality, lb. ... I wC
Sweet Cider, Full Gal., rtQ
Jug Free ..._ aWw
Scant 'j Gal. I I _
Cider I 1C

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