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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 20, 1936, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1936-02-20/ed-1/seq-7/

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FATEINBALANCE
Japanese Opposition Party
In Vote Today Emphasizes
Local Issues.
By the Aisocieted Press,
s TOKIO, February 20.—The Japanese
- alectorate voted today in Japan’s first
national election in exactly four years,
with the primary issue the support or
overthrow of the cabinet of Premier
j Admiral Keisuke Okada.
The consensus of Tokio’s pol ^ical
~m experts was that the chances of the
“national government” and its pow
erful opposition were about even, after
; a spirited campaign.
>» The polls opened at 7 a.m., and be
fore they close at 6 p.m., between
12,000,000 and 13,000,000 voters will
have made their choices for 466 mem
bers of the House of Representatives,
the imperial government’s only elective
Unit.
The early voting, however, was light.
A total of 876. candidates sought
seats in the Lower Chamber of tne
Imperial Parliament—336 from the
. Seiyukai party, comparatively con
servative, opppsed to the Okada gov
ernment, and, until this election, the
% nation’s largest party; 295 from the
• Minseito party, relatively more liberal
and supporting Premier Okada.
# Results Expected Saturday.
The results probably will not be
, known before late Saturday. Tokio
and other cities count their ballots to
morrow, while the tabulation will be
* made Saturday for rural districts.
With the army and navy holding a
dominant position, over the compara
tive weakness of the Parliament and
, political parties, government experts
said the election probably would not
i have any direct effect on formation of
major imperial policies.
The campaign centered on whether
l Premier Okada should have his man
‘ date renewed, a domestic issue which
* some political experts said might re
ault in the downfall of the cabinet.
If the Seiyukai gained 234 or more
of the 466 seats at stake, most Tokio
political writers predicted, the Okada
ministry would resign, yielding govern
ment control either to a Seiyukai gov
ernment or to another “national gov
• ernment,’’ holding Seiyukai support.
The Seiyukai anticipated a strong
rural vote in its favor, but the govern- j
ment—called "national” because many
of its members belong to no party—
counted on smaller groups, to swing
to its support with the Minseito, to
keep it in power.
Local Issues Emphasized.
The Seiyukai platform concentrated
on domestic affairs and referred to
foreign questions only with a demand
for a “positive and self-sufficient
diplomacy.”
The Minseito platform, interpreted
as slightly more conciliator}’ in foreign
affairs, opposed any naval race with j
the United States, hinted at opposi
tion to army and navy appropriations
increases and urged international “co
existence and mutual prosperity." |
The House of Representatives was
dissolved January 21. Premier Okada
deciding to go to the country in the
face of an increasingly hostile Seiyukai
majority. The last general election,
February 20, 1932. resulted in an over- i
whelming Seiyukai victory, that party j
taking 304 seats to 147 for the Minseito. j
The other seats went to lesser parties j
and independents.
The Minseito platform opposes a
naval race with the United States,
timidly hints at opposition to further
increases in army and navy appropria- j
tions and urges “coexistence and
mutual prosperity” in international
affairs.
Today’s election is held as the result
of the dissolution of the House of
Representatives January 21. when
Parliament reassembled after the New
Year holidays. Premier Okada, faced
with an increasingly hostile Seiyukai
majority, decided to go to the country
to seek a more amenable elective
chamber.
_
SOCIAL WORKER GROUP 1
TO HEAR PSYCHOLOGIST
- |
David Seabury to Close Series of
Addresses for Volunteer
Force.
David Seabury. psychologist-author,
will lecture on ‘‘The Social Mind” at
11 a.m. Monday in the United States
cnamoer oi com
merce Building.
This will be the
last lecture of a
series for volun
teer social work
ers sponsored by
the Council of |
Social Agencies, j
Seabury has I
been a practicing ^
psychologist for
22 years, has
done research
work in more
than half a dozen
foreign cities and _
Is the author of D"ld Se*burT
several well-known books, including
“Unmasking Our Mind,” published in
1924.
Mrs. John Jay O’Connor, chairman
ef the council’s Committee on Volun
teers, will preside at Monday's lecture.
Army Announces Tests.
Army examinations to fill existing
and anticipated vacancies in the Vet
erinary Corps, by appointments of
first lieutenants, will be held July
6 to 11. Complete information and
application blank will be sent any in
terested veterinarian upon request to
the adjutant general, War Depart
ment. i
FOR COLDS
TO HBi> NATURE END DISCOMFORTS
QUICKER, INEXPENSIVELY. TAKE—'
Sal icon Tablets
We recommend this Fine Preperstien.
CENTRAL DRUG COMPANY
BAD RASH
WAS HER
TROUBLE 1
Bond whet Mrs. B. of Swiaoraie, Pa., writae
"h» foe# brokt out in a rooh that woe
• erg rod and embarrassing. A/ter using
Cutieurm Soup and Oiutmont tko terrible
bsruiiij cimud Bud in y nmntb my sImb
wag dear.”
This is typical of the wonderful relief
Oatieani vires from itching and irritation
of pimples, rashes, ecsema and other skin
troubles doe to external eaoses. Try this
famous treatment today. AH druggist*—He. :
Bor FREE sample, write Cntionrn,
Dept SI, Malden, Maas. I
A A.
THIS WEEK END AT A&P MARKETS
VL &lOt&np ...
ewitj
Freshly killed, specially prepared and
dressed by a new, exclusive method (the only
one of its kind in D. C.), assuring the utmost
in quality and tastiness . . . THE
BEST YOU CAN BUY.
* Look for the G. E. P. yellow label
quality attached to the wing of each
bird." _ _
I
SOUA
EE ROASTS
-tUCK • - • ' yrc
wb • •,k "
.coRt'®; '
FAt#/- "iTc
rukk^f. _..
SShS®”*1
Lean ond <e"d£ram80t this low price
Whole or
lamb chops
t 2£_J£ii
' "AtSjgUES". 25‘
Smoked -J2S$L — ”'h
Swift's Premium smoked tongue
-~ ' *" '__ i AK i C
1 breakfast su*es -
1 Adam.’ Scrapp^-2'1"
1 Tavlot's P°* Ro11 54 * 2 ,
1 SUced BaL°n * - - - «*
I Pork Pudding -
FRESH VEGETABLES AND
FANCY FRUITS
I ne entire family will surely enjoy a
delicious fried chicken dinner, Sunday.
There's no treat quite equal!
DIME A DDI E DEL MONTE.large \ "Tc
r InEArr LE sliced No.2>/aCa. |# .
TABLE SALT 2;; 5‘
HEINZ PICKLES v21*
SUGAR FINE GRANULATED. 10 cloth 49c
CHEESE amer,can • - lon?bhorn 17C D^Y19e
CREAM CHEESE™™- 2ic \5e
PURE LA R D orupkg..2,ts 2 5c
HEINZ KETCHUP 2 *.25*
1 HEINZ SOUPS sir 2- 25e
1 BIS Q UIC K betterAbiEscuits ' * - 2,°kgz 15 It 2 5 C
1 MOTOR OIL UGHTlr MEDIUM ’ \ 2 Bf'
FRESH HADDOCK FILLETS ib. 23c
STANDARD OYSTERS-pt. 25c
SELECT OYSTERS- pt. 30c
SLICED SWORDFISH-n> 25c
FANCY POLLOCK FILLETS ib. 12c
SLICED SALMON-«>. 25c
SLICED HALIBUT-ib. 25c
—FRESH CLEANED—
PORGIES_lb- 10c
TROUT_lb 18c
CROAKERS-He
———
Outstanding E? I | I D f*- -
Savins, on MUyK j
Pillsbury's Best 121b. B Be 24ib. *1.07 <31EST-'. *1
or Gold Medal - - ba* J ^ ba* I V, XXXX :/
'••/Jow/.;** i|j
Sunnyfield ,2Ifc A Cc 24ib. OTc B™^ f
Plain or bag 4^ bag «uafo»*»u«Mmsc& »
Self-Rising ^ » /
» _ ■ - - _
HEINZ BEANS
SELECT YOUR FAVORITE VARIETY!
CAULIFLOWER 2-25'
NICE QUALITY WHITE HEADS—A REAL VALUE
FRESH PEAS 3-17'
THEY COULDNT BE SWEETER OR TASTIER IF THEY CAME OUT OF YOUR OWN BACK YARD—SERVE
THEM OFTEN. THE FAMILY WILL NEVER TIRE OF THE DELICIOUS FLAVOR OF THESE SPARKLING
FRESH FLORIDA PEAS.
CARROTS.2—9c
CRISPY FRESH AND TENDER—PACKED WITH HEALTH-GIVING QUALITIES. SERVE WITH
GREEN PEAS AND IN VARIOUS OTHER WAYS.
YORK APPLES 4 ‘10'
basKET, 98c. HERE'S A REAL BARGAIN ON YORK APPLES. LAY ASIDE A
COUPLE BUSHELS AT THIS PRICE.
, Grapefruit-3 “ 14c
Sweet Potatoes-3 10c
Potatoes u 8 N#-1 . .10,bi 23c
Florida Celery_ bunch 10c
Texas Beets.*“ch 5c
Turnips ’SIS.".3 ^ 10c
Broccoli.2 15c
Lettuce ,“l"‘_2 15c
TOMATOES 2-25'
.•ANCY QUALITY REPACKS j !
BANANAS — 3 ,b‘ 14c
FIRM AND (t*E. EAT BANANAS FREQUENTLY—DIGESTIBLE AND NOURISHING.
PRICES EFFECTIVE 1 P.M. TODAY UNTIL CLOSE OF BUSINESS SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 92, 1929
BOSTON STYLE KIDNEY BEANS
3 is 25c 3 -r 25c
2 is 25c 2 25c
With Tomato Sauce or Vagotarian Stylo
3 is 25c l? 11c
Chocolate Poms NA sD*c!,0co\.,b- 17c
Grandmother's Crullers^ 10c
Rainbow Compound “ .** 15c
Oakite Silverware * “ .- 9c
A-Penn Cleaner - - - - can 49c
Renuzit Cleaner-£; 49c
Navy Beans.3 ,bs 10c
Baking Powder-17c
Quaker Oats ------ p^t. 8c
Wesson Oil.p,nt emn 23c
Karo Syrup-- £ 12c
Wheaties.2 pkgs. 23c
Puffed Wheat.pks 9c
Del Monte Sardines - - ean 9c.
YUKON CLUB
GINGER ALE ORAGOLDEYN I
SPARKLING WATER
LIME DRY
qt. bottles
contents
■ ■ • _ Clam Chowder ^ U oi. ^ Q _
neinz Consomme or Madriiene A. cans 4>7C
Ritz Butter Crackers 21c
Chili Sauce Su,Una-^1; 10c
Sparkle GR."r£ddinf - - 3 *- 13c
Butter Kernel Corn 2 cans 23c I
Butter Kernel Peas 2 cans 29c
Baked Beans *"i",77’ 3 25c
Iona Pears -'“^!!i17c
r.„Ju Choc. Chips ,b. 1 r.
VeOnay or KrisPy Sticks - -- -- i J
Peanut Butter- RT 15c
Grandmother's Bread lb. loaf 7C I
Eight O'Clock Coffee - -lb 17c
Pacific Tissue-. 6 19c
£ . i
★ A- P FOOD STORES *
■; • . 1 ;
4 4 4

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