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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 27, 1936, Image 15

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U. S. EXPERTS SEEK
SPEEDIER FLYING
*. . t
Five to Eight Hours Across
Continent in Sub-Strato
sphere Aim.
By the Associated Press.
Government air experts are seeking
to develop sub-stratosphere flying so
that airplanes can span the Continent
In five to eight hours.
Private industry is aiding Commerce
Department, Weather Bureau and
Post Office officials in planning new
equipment and charting air currents
for safe and swift flying 25,000 feet
above the earth.
J. C. Edgerton, Bureau of Air Com
merce expert, said yesterday that de
velopment of efficient compressors to
keep air pressure within the planes
constant at all times appeared to be
the main problem.
That Held is being explored now,
along with development of engines,
propellors and fuselages capable of
withstanding thes train of substra
tosphere winds.
At the same time, the Weather Bu
reau is charting upper-level wind
currents. Its scientists are working
on radio balloons to test wind velocity,
temperature, humidity and other
factors vital in aviation.
"Plying at 25,000 to 30,000 feet,”
Edgerton said, “will increase the speed
of a plane 28 per cent, all other factors
being equal.”
Co-operative Buying Grows.
Co-operative buying in Prance made
B substantial increase last year.*
■ ■
SERVICE ORDERS
ARMY ORDERS.
Perry, Maj. Basil H., Field Artillery,
from Army War College to Fort
Knox, Ky.
Ellis, Maj. Walter C.. Signal Corps,
from duty in office of the chief signal
officer, to Fort Monmouth, N. J.,
June 30.
Wallace, Maj. John H., Field Ar
tillery, from duty in office of the chief
of Field Artillery, to Fort Des Moines,
Iowa, July 17.
The following officers of the Engi
neer Corps from duty at station in
dicated to Fort Belvoir, Va., Septem
ber 4, for duty as students:
Kumpe, First Lieut. Edward F., of
fice of the chief of Engineers: Potter,
First Lieut. William E., Pittsburgh:
Abell, First Lieut. Julian D., Cornell
University; Whipple, First Lieut. Wil
liam, jr., Princeton University; Carl
son, First Lieut Gunnard W„ Massa
chusetts Institute of Technology;
Danis, Second Lieut. John J., Cornell
University; Ely, Second Lieut. William
J., Cornell University; Hagan, Second
Lieut. James V., Princeton University;
Hailock, Second Lieut. Duncan, Cor
nell University; Beeler, Second Lieut.
George W., University of Iowa; Davis,
Second Lieut. Hoy D., jr., University
of Iowa; Gates, Second Lieut, Clayton
S., Massachusetts Institute of Tech
nology; Herb, Second Lieut. Edward
G.. Massachusetts Institute of Tech
nology; Tripp, Second Lieut. Robert
C., Massachusetts Institute of Tech
nology.
CITY NEWS IN BRIEF.
TODAY.
Dinner, Washington Building and
Loan League, Mayflower Hotel, 7 p.m.
Dinner, Weather Bureau, Masonic
Club, Mayflower Hotel, 6:30 p.m.
Meeting, Ancient Order of Hiber
nians, Mayflower Hotel, 6:30 p.m.
Dance, Mississippi State Society,
Wardman Park Hotel, 10 p.m..
Meeting and dance, Illinois State
Society, Willard Hotel, 8 p.m.
Supper meeting. Veterinary Medical
Club, Willard Hotel, 8:30 p.m.
Dance, Alabama State Society, Wil
lard Hotel, 8 p.m.
Dance, Buchanan Community Cen
ter, 8:30 p.m.
Meeting, Pennsylvania Democratic
Club, Willard Hotel, 8 p.m.
TOMORROW.
Dance, Ben Murch Community Cen
ter, 8:30 p.m.
Dance, Langley Community Center,
First and T streets northeast, 8:30 p.m.
Dance, Kentucky State Society, Wil
lard Hotel, 9 p.m.
Dinner, National City Christian
Church, Lafayette Hotel, 6 p.m.
Dance, Missouri State Society,
Shoreham Hotel, 8:30 p.m.
Dance, Progressive Club, Mayflower
Hotel, 9 pm.
Banquet and dance. Iota Sigma Up
eilon Sorority, 7:30 p.m.
Meeting. Women’s Alliance of All
Eouls' Unitarian Church, 11:30 am.
Card and bingo party, John Quincy
Adams Parent-Teacher Association,
library, Adams School, 8 pm.
Offers Body
MOTHER SEEKS OPERATION
FOR HER SON, 9.
MRS. JESSIE CORNELL.
The 45-year-old Fort Worth, Tex.,
widow, has offered her body to
science so her son Fred, 9, can be
given an operation. She was as
sured the boy would get medical
attention although she received no
reply from her offer.
—Copyright, A. P. Wirephoto.
ACTION ON BILL DELAYED
Senate Postpones Debate on Rural
Electrification.
Senate action on the $1,000,000,000
rural electrification bill was pushed
back a week yesterday as part of a
drive by administration leaders to cut
it small enough to meet the quoted
wishes of President Roosevelt.
An agreement with Senator Norris,
Republican, of Nebraska, author of
the bill, to postpone further debate
until next Wednesday was reached by
Majority Leader Robinson, Democrat,
of Arkansas amid growing evidence of
opposition.
1
PHILIPPINE TRADE
Tariff Commission Pair to
Report Findings for
Parley Use.
Frank A. Waring and Ben David
Dorfman. economists of the United
States Tariff Commission who have
been in the Philippines for several
months, have returned to the United
States and are expected back In
Washington in about a week.
Making the trip to confer with
Philippine officials and gathering data
for use In trade conferences between
this country and the new Philippine
Commonwealth, Waring and Dorf
man are expected to submit a report
of their findings to the Tariff Com
mission.
With the understanding that con
ferences will be held between repre
sentatives of the two governments
before certain provisions of the
Philippine Independence act become
effective, the'major issue jmder con
sideration is whether the proposed
tariff arrangement would be ruinous
to major Industries of the islands.
Up to this time America has been
the principal market for Philippine
exports with no tariff barriers between
the two countries. By the terms of
the Independence act, however, quotas
are established for surgar, cocoanut oil,
cordage fiber and other major exports
of the Islands, with excesses subject
to tariff rates. Starting with the
sixth year of independence of the
islands an export tax is added to the
tariff with full tariff rates becoming
effective on all exports after 10 years.
Students of trade between the two
countries fear imposition of these
levies will mean virtual ruination of
the sugar and cocoanut oil industries
on the islands as well as severe cur
tailment of other Industries.
Recent figures showed the United
States was taking 83 per cent of
Philippine exports on a tonnage basis
while Imports from the United States
amounted to 65 per cent of all enter
ing the islands. The islands'ktand as
eighth among customers of the United
States while this country ranks first
as a market for Philippine products.
No Conference Date Set.
Although no date for the antici
pated conferences have been set, it
is hoped by representatives of the
islands to have them this year. High
Commissioner Frank Murphy is ex
pected in Washington in March.
Filipino leaders, Including Resident
Commissioner Quintln Paredes, first
envoy of the Commonwealth of the
Philippines to the United States, are
hopeful that the Roosevelt adminis
ration will modify the severity of the
conomlc provisions of the lndepend
nce act. In urging Congress to re*
nact the Independence law after it
/as rejected by the Philippine legis
Eiture, President Roosevelt said:
Where imperfections or inequalities
xist I am confident that they can be
orrected after proper hearing and
n fairness to both peoples.”
In finally accepting the Hare
iawes-Cutting act, rechristenel the
ifcDuffie-Ty dings Act, the Philippine
egislature gave as one of its reasons
or doing so the President’s statement
which gives to the Filipino people
easonable assurances of further
tearing and due consideration of their
lews.”
Rabbi Metz to Speak.
Rabbi Solomon Metr will speak at
i p.m. tomorrow at the evening serv
ices of Adas Israel Synagogue. An
spen forum will be held with "Youth
Looks on Jewish Life” as the subject.
Morton Wilner, past president of Argo
Lodge, will lead discussions.
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ALAN 8. SMITH. General
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frthted EGGSdoz- 29c
* Pure Creamery
BUTTER* 38c
Krafts Soft
CREAM
CHEESE
Wisconsin, full of holes
SWITZER
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ASSORTED BAKED PIES . . 2.«15c ■
Ham & Chicken Croquettes • 6 for 25c ■
nSS OYSTERS ao,. 3 5c Fish Cakes «... 19c I
ST SALADS io.12c COLE SLAW .»12c ■
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