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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 26, 1936, Image 18

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LANGLEY FIELD
SESSION SCENE
Aeronautical Designers and
Engineers to Meet Next
Month.
The struggle of American aeronau
tical designers and engineers to keep
abreast of an increasing thrust of
foreign development will be graphically
displayed to representatives of the in
dustry and the Federal Government
at the eleventh annual Aircraft En
ginnering Research Conference of the
National Advisory Committee for
Aeronautics next month at Langley
Field. Va.
As a result of increasing attend
ance at the conference and the un
usual importance of this year’s event,
the conference will be divided into
two sections, the first on May 20, the i
second May 22.
Among the new pieces of research
apparatus to be exhibited will be a
high-speed wind tunnel in which air
speeds of up to 500 miles per hour
may be developed for test purposes.
The first section of the conference.
May 20. will be for executives and |
engineers of the manufacturing and |
operating industries and Government
officials. The second section will be 1
for personnel of the governmental
agencies using aircraft; representa
tive's of engineering societies and mem
bers of faculties of professional
schools. There will be identical pro
grams presented each of the two days,
beginning at 8:45 a.m.
Those assigned to the first section
will leave Washington by steamer at
6:30 p.m., May 19, returning at 7
a.m.. May 21. The second section
will leave at 6:30 p.m.. May 21, re
turning the morning of May 23.
The conference is held annually to
permit representatives of every branch
of American aeronautics to receive
first-hand reports of progress in aero
nautical research at the great Federal
laboratories at Langley Field and to
witness demonstrations of the special
equipment and methods used, and
also to permit the N. A. C. A. to re
ceive comments and suggestions from
the Industry as to the research prob
lems deemed of particular importance.
-•-•
FIGURES AID P.W. A.
$700,000,000 PLEA
Beiter Offers Data to Show W.P.A.
Could Get Along on Balance
of $1,500,000,000.
the Associated Press.
Figures intended to show the Works
Progress Administration could carry
on at its present tempo until Con
gress reconvenes if $700,000,000 of
the proposed $1,500,000.00 relief ap
propriation were earmarked for public
works, were cited yesterday by Repre
sentative Beiter. Democrat, of New
York
"But more important,” he said in
e statement, “this sum (the $700,
000,000) will provide a year's employ
ment at current wages and salaries
to 1,140,000 persons at a per capita
cost to the Federal Government of
only $615."
Relief Administrator Harry Hopkins
previously had reported to the House
Appropriations Committee, which is
considering President Roosevelt's re
quest for the billion and a half, how
he could use it all, and more, to
provide work for upward of 3.000,000
persons during the 1937 fiscal year.
The deficiency bill carrying the
relief funds is expected to be placed
before the House week after next.
MANSIONS DESCRIBED
Col. Harry Francis Cunningham,
Chairman of the committee on educa
tion of the Washington Chapter,
American Institute of Architects,
•poke on the colonial mansions in and
near Washington at the Washington
Heights Presbyterian Church Friday
night, under auspices of the church's
Ladies’ Aid Society.
Col. Cunningham’s discussion in
cluded the Mason House on Analostao
Island, the Patterson House. Wood
lawn, Gunston Hall, Sotterly, Deep
Falls, Tulip Hill and the Dower House.
Miss Elizabeth Meininger, pianist,
and Miss Susan Barbee, violinist, and
Mrs. David Rankin Barbee furnished
music.
Washington Wayside
Random Observations of Interesting
Events and Things.
FANCY—AND FACT.
ERE is the story going the
rounds in the Munitions
Building.
An insanely jealous married
woman, carrying a revolver, is comb
ing the building for a sight of the
w'oman she regards as her rival for
the affections of her husband. The
other day, pursuing her quest, she was
seen to climb on a desk in an office in
one of the wings of the building, train
a pair of binoculars on an office in the
adjoining wing, awaiting visual fulfill
ment of the awful picture running
through her jealous mind.
As pointed out, that's the story
going the rounds.
The real story, however, is that a
girl clerk with a new pair of binoculars
thought she would test them out by
trying to read the small lettering on
the side of a blimp flying outside the
deserted office window.
Some one saw her. put two and two
together, and got a pretty sensational
four out of it.
The girl making the binocular test
told us about it all.
* * * *
SPECULATING.
A wayside operative out for an
afternoon ride with Washington
friends the other Sunday heard
the feminine portion of the crowd
talking about a man who died
within the past year.
All were fond of the deceased, it
seemed, until one young lady re
lated an incident which revealed a
few miserly qualities the dead man
once possessed. Soon followed other
remarks which, while not venomous,
were in an entirely different tone
than that used earlier in the con
versation.
"My goodness." one bright young
thing exclaimed, "I bet his ears are
burning!"
* * * *
CACHE.
A Washington newspaper man who
recently moved into a new home in
Arlington County, Va., had a house
warming several days ago. His wife
is a staunch prohibitionist, and the
invited guests, most of them, at least,
knew it.
Anyhow, the guests went to the party
expecting ginger ale, grape juice punch
and other non-intoxicating drinks.
And that's exactly what was served.
Among the guests, however, was a
young man about town, who believed
in preparedness first. He carried along
a pint of bourbon, hoping to get an
opportunity now and then to take a
little "nip" without being discovered.
As time marched on, the young
mans thirst increased. Finally he
■ mustered sufficient courage to excuse
I himself aAd wandered to the wash
: room. He took several good-sized
‘'nips1’ to make up for lost time, and
thought he'd better hide the bottle
before it was discovered bulging out
I of his hip pocket.
The wash room was small. The
young man about town thought he
would hide it In a place where it was
least likely to be found. Lo and
behold! It was filled with whiskey
bottles.
* * * *
O. G. P. U.
CH—SH—SH—! Are you being
^ “shadowed." trailed? Better look
behind you as you step off a street
car or bus—be on your guard against
slinking shadows behind trees or fur
tive forms behind ftnces. You are
probably being followed.
It’s a new game originated by a
group of boys in the Bloomingdale
section, designed for two purposes:
(1) to get experience as volunteer
Junior “G” men, and (2) to make
fertile use of the popular street car
pass.
They are planing a city-wide organ
ization with rendezvous to compare
notes, and to keep a card index on
the meanderings of well-known citi
zens.
SYMBOL. •
T3ECORDS don't make the athletic
hero so far as Mickey Egan is
concerned. Bandages, to his 9-year
old's mind, are the symbols of prowess.
The dnrk side of his love for sport
manifested itself recently in the ap
pearance of an elastic guard on
Mickey’s uninjured wrist. He had
spent 25 cents of his own money for
it, admitted that his wrist was as
sound as a dollar, but defended the
purchase on the ground that a man
was not an athlete without a few
bandages to show for It.
His dad had to argue vigorously to
keep Michey from wearing the bandage
to bed, finally winning his point when
he made it clear there would be no
one dropping In to see Mickey’s wounds
while he slept.
* * * *
TENANT.
Spring must seem perpetual to
one small song sparrow which has
taken up an abode in that luxuri
ant, man-made forest of shrubs,
trees and tropical flowers at the
Botanic Gardens. The intruder
slipped into the huge glass-walled
enclosure one cold day a week or
so ago and since has been singing
as happily as if he owned the place.
* * * *
CHAMP,
A PROMINENT Government official,
more prominent as to position
than physique, got a pretty lucky break
the other night, but he did not realize
it until some time later.
The official, it seems, was annoyed
by the noises from a room at the local
hotel at which he lives. He stood it
for a while, but finally marched bellig
erently across the hall and knocked.
The large man who answered his sum
mons listened mildly while the official
sputtered, fumed and threatened. He
promised to see what he could do
about it
Next morning at his office building,
the indignant citizen saw the same
man.
"Know that guy?” asked the eleva
tor operator, full of admiration.
“That's Jim Braddock,” he explained
when the official said he didn’t.
Tax Bill Cries “Author, Author
But Coyle Keeps Behind Scenes
David Cushman Coyle may have
written the new tax bill, as Repre
sentatives Lamneck, Democrat, of
Ohio and Tobey, Republican, of New
Hampshire contend, but if he did it
in Washington, he must have been in
disguise.
During House debate Friday on
the bill Lamneck charged Coyle wrote
it. But who is Coyle, where can we
find him? That was what newspaper
men wanted to know. Lamneck didn’t
know. “Wish I did," he said.
Tobey knew a little more. He said
Coyle had been a “brain truster” for
three years, that he was the one who
said “saving for a rainy day is out
of date in this country because saving
for a rainy day only Increases the
rain.” He said Coyle once wrote a
book advocating raising $50,000,000,000
by taxation and spending it to bring
recovery, although the national in
come is $45,000,000,000. But more than
that he did not know.
At the Treasury Department, at
the White House, no one seemed to
have heard of him, much less to know
where he might be found to see
what he had to say about Lamnerk’s
charge. No one even knew whether
he had ever been to Washington. Even
the House Ways and Means Commit
tee, where the tax bill was born, was
in the dark.
Maybe it’s the David Cushman Coyle
of Bronxville, N. Y„ who is listed in
“Who’s Who.” He is set forth as a
consulting engineer, author of a bro
chure called "The Irrepressible Con
flict—Business vs. Finance,” and va
rious magazine articles. He even ap
pears to be a member of the Tech
nical Board of Review of the P. W. A.
and a consultant to the National Plan
ning Board.
But, if he wrote the tax bill, he
missed meeting some mighty fine
people.
What Will Grandpa Say?
OMAHA, Nebr. (A>).—Mangus Valien,
83, arrived at the police station with a
cut on the head and a complaint. “I
rebuked my boy Ed for his late hours
and evil companions.” he said. "He
hit me with a brick.” The police
launched a search for the boy, who
is 51.
Treasure Hunt Tarns.
The company now seeking burled
treasures on Cocos Island will make a
special search In a spot not previously
surveyed.
Plane Hunts Birds.
An amphibian monoplane will be
used by the American expedition that
will collect bird, animal and plant life
in New Guinea.
Grands
and
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