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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 28, 1936, Image 4

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RUSSIA AND JAPAN
PLAN ARBITRATION
Agree to Appoint Two Com
missions to Settle Bor
der Disputes.
BACKGROUND—
Russian influence in Mongolia
and Japanese domination of Man•
chukuo have resulted in guerrilla
fighting along disputed borders, in
creased possibility of open warfare
between the two major powers as
one incident followed another.
Penetration of Mongolia by
Japanese expansionists would en
danger Trans-Siberian Railroad,
chief link between Moscow and her
Pacific territory.
By the Associated Press.
TOKIO, April 28.—Appointment of
two commissions to adjudicate Russo
Manchukuoan border problems was
reported officially as agreed upon in
principle by Soviet and Japanese au
thorities.
One of the commissions would settle
frontier disputes or violence, and the
other would resurvey and fix the in
ternational boundary of Manchukuo
from Lake Khanka to the border of
Korea.
The Soviet Government agreed not
to press at this time for appointment
of a commission to adjudicate simi
larly boundary disputes and clashes on
the line between Outer Mongolia,
which is allied with Russia, and Man
chukuo, the Asiatic state set up by
Japan.
The agreement was reached by
Hachiro Arita, Japanese foreign min
ister, and Dr. Constantine Youreneff,
Russian ambassador to Japan.
It was hailed as a positive step
toward peace. Half of each delega
tion will be Soviet representatives, the
other half equally composed of Jap
anese and Manchukuoans.
Ethiopia
(Continued From First Page.)
numbers of Ethiopian wounded were
centered at the town of Debra Birhan.
A British ambulance unit received mes
sages asking that more lorries be sent
to evacuate the wounded.
ITALIAN'S UNOPPOSED.
Force Two-thirds of Way to Addis
Ababa, Leader Reports.
ROME. April 28 (#">.—Italy’s war
leader in Ethiopia, Marshal Pietro
Badoglio, reported today to his govern
ment that a motorized column moving
on Addis Ababa already has covered
nearly two-thirds of the distance from
Dessye to the Ethiopian capital.
An official communique on his re
port said:
“On the northern front, our mo
torized column which left Dessye ad
vanced 140 kilometers (92 miles) along
the motor road to Addis Ababa with
out encountering resistance.
rmuuuci tuiumu, wuiLxi xtrxt uurm
Eu, advanced about 50 kilometers (31
miles), reaching the Uacit River.
"Sultan Aussa Mohammed Jahio
reached our line and made acts of
submission to the military authorities.
"On the Somaliland front our vic
torious offensive is continuing.
“On the left of our line the Libyan
detachments which left Baggamedo
defeated and dispersed strong enemy
groups in the Fafan River Valley.
“In the center the Frusci column
completed a reconnaissance of the ter
rain in the vicinity of Hamanlei. There
it captured three armored cars which
were abandoned in the Fafan Valley
during the reconnaissance of the j
Maletti column November 11. There j
also was recaptured the machine guns
of the airplane of Lieut. Minniti, who
was awarded a gold medal.
“On our right wing the Agostini
column reinforced itself at its positions
in Gunugado.
“The air corps co-operated with the
greatest efficiency in actions along the
entire front.’’
Italian dispatches reported two col
umns of native Eritrean askari ad
vanced far ahead of the main motor
ized column of 15,000 Italian white
soldiers, protecting both flanks and
clearing the countryside of roving
Ethiopian bands.
Direct advices from the main unit,
Which rumbled out of Dessye, former
headquarters of Emperor Haile Selas
sie, at dawn Sunday, said it reached
a point 62 miles to the south yester
day after its advance guard encoun
tered brief resistance.
Skirmish With Natives.
Outposts fought a minor skirmish
with several hundred native irregulars,
the dispatches said, killing 14 Ethi
opians and wounding many others with
machine gun Are before the irregulars
fled to the hills. The main column
proceeded on its course.
One of the askari columns reported
to the high command, under Marshal
Pietro Badoglio, that it was moving
rapidly to the south on a short cut,
off the Imperial highway.
Ankober, toward which the main
mechanized forces drove, lies about
110 miles directly south of Dessye, and
60 miles northeast of the objective,
Addis Ababa.
(The straight line distance between
Dessye and Addis Ababa is about 175
miles, but the distance over the tor
tuous imperial highway, winding
through the peaks and passes to the
central plateau, is estimated officially
at 262 miles.)
Italian dispatches indicated that
Sasa Baneh, on the outer line of de
fense of Harar, on the southern
front, was at least surrounded, if not
already occupied.
Surrender Is Expected.
An announcement of annihilation or
surrender of the remaining Ethiopian
defenders there was expected momen
tarily after three southern Italian
columns reported overriding resistance
last week In their co-ordinated move
ment against Sasa Baneh.
From Sasa Baneh, 175 miles south
east of Harar, Italian sources said, the
Italian advance would turn to that
capitol of Harar Province and head
quarters of Ras Nasibu.
Among the new Ethiopian submis
sions reported from Dessye was that
of Sultan Mohammed of Aussa, the
strategic territory controling the East
ern Danakilia sector.
Italian dispatches said the Sultan
returned yesterday to resume the
friendly relations he had maintained
with the Italians before he fled his
capital some time ago upon the ap
proach of a Fascist flying column.
V. S. OFFICER SAILS.
Maj. Fiske Will Join Italians on Way
to Addis Ababa.
NAPLES, Italy, April 28 OP).—Maj.
N. E. Fiske, American military attache,
sailed on the steamer Lombardia last
night for East Africa.
Also making the voyage were the
Italian Militia Gen. Lambruschini, the
Brazilian Gen. Castillo Delima and
800 Italian workmen.
Fiske’s assignment Is to continue
with the Italian advance toward Addis
Ababa. He may enter the Ethiopian
capital as the first American officer.
WATCHMAKER BURNED
IN GASOLINE BLAZE
—»■—■■■ ■ " *
Shop in Xresge Building Fired as
Short Circuit Explodes Pan
of Cleaner.
Hjalmar Erickson, 47, watchmaker,
4Q3 Kresge Building, suffered burns
about the hands and arms late yes
terday when his workshop was set
afire by an explosion of a pan of
gasoline.
The explosion was caused by a
short circuit in the electric motor
Erickson was operating. A spark set
off the gasoline.
Erickson used a fire extinguisher
until firemen arrived to extinguish
the blaze, which shot billows of
smoke out of the fourth-floor win
dows and through the interior halls.
Firemen dressed Erickson’s injuries
and he was taken to a hospital.
Visit California, Colorado,
National Parks, the South
west and Pacific North
west. Also low fares to
Texas Centennial.
AIR-CONDITIONED
ALL THE WAY
Start your journey on the
Capitol Limited to Chicago
or the National Limited to
St. Louis—two fine trains
to the West.
Ait our Travel Bureau to trip
you plan a trip. No obligation.
0. L MOORMAN, Cun. Pass. A sunt
Woodward tldp., ISth « M Sts.. N. W.
Phono District 3300. ur Notional 7370
&
Waiting for Missing Mother
Dolores Harris, 8, and her sister June, 11, living at the
Receiving Home with their brother Herman, 9, while authorities
search for their mother. Mrs. Dorothy Harris, 28, has been
missing since April 15, when the family was evicted from their
C street residence.
At the time of the eviction the Travelers’ Aid Society agreed
to keep the children until the mother should return for them
the following day. She has not been seen since, and Herman,
meanwhile, has had the measles at Gallinger Hospital.
Bobby Reid, 2, another Receiving Home visitor yesterday,
has been sent to his home. —Star Staff Photo.
JEWELRY REPAIRED
Brlflf It t« a firm you cub tract.
Moderate prices. Skilled werk
maashlp. Easy credit terms.
CASTELBERG’S
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ll6th&Eye Sts. N.W
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PRESIDENT
JEWS’ CAMPAIGN
Drive Launched at Session
of 400 Workers in Com
munity Center.
A campaign to raise from $50,000
to $60,000 for the United Jewish Ap
peal was launched last night at a
meeting of 400 volunteer workers in
the Jewish Community Center.
Isidore Hershfleld, chairman of the
campaign, pointed out that $30,000 of
the District’s $50,000 quota already
has been pledged, and there is a good
chance that the quota will be over
subscribed.
Disastrous Conditions Cited.
Hershfleld termed conditions in cer
tain European countries the most dis
astrous in the long history of the
Jewish race. He described the work
which is being done to relieve suffer
ers in Poland and Germany and to
reconstruct Palestine.
Campaign leaders expressed amaze
ment at the response which has
greeted the appeal this year. They
attributed it to a growing realization
of the plight of the Jews in other
countries.
The Jews in the United States are
raising $7,000,000 this year for relief
and reconstruction. Hershfleld said
the Joint Distribution Committee had
saved the lives of a million Jews in
Poland alone since the war.
Palestine, he pointed out, had pro
vided a refuge for 350,000 Jews who
had fled from persecution In Central
and Eastern Europe.
Stresses Small Gifts.
Mrs. Charles A Goldsmith, vice
president of the appeal, stressed the
importance of getting small contri
butions as well as large. She de
dared it the duty of every Jewiah
family to participate.
Other speakers included Morris
Cafritz, Edmund I. Kaufmann, Morris
Simon, Charles B. Dulcan, Mrs.
Fedora Lewis, Mrs. Leonard B.
Schloss, Mrs. Aaron Shalowltz,
Joseph D. Kaufman and Louis E.
Splegler, drive director.
Another meeting will be held at
the Willard Hotel tonight under aus
pices of the Special Gifts Committee,
headed by Dulcan.
EX-CABINET MEMBER’S
DAUGHTER TO MARRY
Helen Beale Houston Engaged to
B. C. Patton, Great-Grandson
of Kentucky’s 8th Governor.
By tbe Associated Press.
NEW YORK. April 28.—Announce
ment was made yesterday of the en
gagement of Helen Beale Houston,
daughter of Franklin Houston, presi
dent of the Mutual Life Insurance Co.,
to Robert Caldwell Patton, son of Mrs.
George Charles Patton of Louisville,
Ky.. and the late Mr. Patton of Mon
treal.
Miss Houston’s father, at one time
president of the University of Texas,
was Secretary of Agriculture under
President Woodrow Wilson.
Her llanee is the grandson of Isaac
Caldwell, Louisville attorney, and the
great-grandson of Gen. John Adair,
eighth Governor of Kentucky.
Dogs Halt Modernization.
TAPPAHANNOCK, Va. </P).—Dogs
spoiled a modernization plan he:e.
Strolling cannies put so many paw
prints in the wet concrete that side
walk plans were adandoned.
HARNESS- Laron I
Repairing of Leather Gooda
G.W.King.Jr. 51111thSt.N.W.
Are Restored by
27,000 Honorary Aides
in **Good Standing*9
for Time Being.
By the Associated Press.
FRANKFORT. Ky., April 28.—Sev
enteen thousand Kentucky colonels,
admirals and similar honorary aides
were restored to “good standing” yes
terday by Acting Gov. James E. Wise
exactly one month after Kentucky’s
attorney general, Beverly M. Vincent,
ruled them all “out of office."
The acting governor, serving as chief
executive in the absence of both Gov.
A. B. Chandler and Lieut. Gov. Keen
Johnson, increased the standing army
of honorary aides by two. They were
the first commissions Issued under the
Chandler administration, which took
office last December 10.
Informed of the action of Wise, who
is president pro-tem of the State Sen
ate, Vincent said he was adhering to
his original opinion holding there was
no constitutional provision for ap
pointment of colonels. Both the State
and Federal Constitutions, he pointed
out, provide that no titles of nobility
shall be issued, and because colonels
have no duties, terms of office or au
thority, he said the commissions
amount to titles of nobility.
Gov. Chandler, who hasn't issued a
colonel's commission since he took
office and has repeatedly said he
doesn’t intend to, said it was all right
with him if the acting governor
"creates a lot of Kentucky Colonels."
The governor was attending a base ball
game in Cincinnati.
FOOT BALL COACH LOSES
$10,000 SUIT APPEAL
Supreme Court Refuses to Review
Walsh'• Contention Against
Damage Verdict.
Leonard P. Walsh, assistant foot
ball coach at George Washington Uni
verslty, lost his Supreme Court fight
yesterday to avoid payment of $10,000
damages assessed against him by a
District Jury after his automobile se
riously Injured Mrs. Anna Rosenberg
In 1933.
Mrs. Rosenberg asserted through
her attorneys, Alvin L. Newmyer,
Lewis H. Shapiro and David O. Bress,
that Walsh’s automobile was negli
gently operated. The accident oc
curred near the Keystone Apartments,
Twenty-first street and Pennsylvania
avenue, where Mrs. Rosenberg lives. '
Despite contentions by Walsh that
his brother was driving the car. and
that instructions of the trial Judga
denied him his constitutional rights,
the Supreme Court refused to review
the case.
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Credentials
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ONLY the rashest of mortals will risk the unknown.
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a stratosphere flight. Few of us are willing to rush
j in where angels fear to tread. We seek precedent for
our every move—in the food we eat, in the clothes
| we wear, in the places we go.
The advertisements in this paper are the signed
credentials of firms which seek your business. They
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Before you run downtown, run down the list of
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Combing the advertising pages in advance is a
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I

FOR A TROPICAL CRUISE
FULL OF ROMANCE AND MYSTERY
by CONINGSBY DAWSON
“Why don't you hire a detective?/* said young
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“THE FINE AIT
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The first in a new weekly
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Lowell Thomas takes yea
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from Ireland to Calcutta,
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