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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 03, 1936, Image 45

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Winning Contract
BY THE FOUR ACES.
(David Burnsttne Michael Gottlieb. Oswald Jacoby Howard Schenken.
world's leadlna team-of-iour. inventors oi the system that
has beaten every other system in existence.)
Bidding situations.
EVERY once in a While the fact j
that there are 635.013,559,600 ‘
possible combinations of 13 |
cards is commented upon, but ,
we wonder how many of our readers
have ever considered how many varia- (
tions there can be m bidding. I
Let us suppose that South opens the
bidding with one club. The next play*
»r may pass or double; he may bid one,
two, three or four in one of three (
other suits, or one, two or three no
trump. and he may bid two clubs a
total of 18 possibilities right there.
Now we come to North, who will
have from 5 to 15 bids at his disposal,
depending upon what West has done.
In turn. East wUl have plenty of op
> tions, so that by the time South is
ready for his second bid. he may be
faced by any one of a thousand differ
ent situations, and by the time it is
his turn for a third or fourth bid.
assuming that the bidding continues
that long, the possible variations may
well run into the millions.
Naturally no system can hope to |
Cover all these possibilities, nor can !
- I PUBLIC LIBRARY
‘GHOSTS.”
THE incomparable Nazimova
comes to the National The
ater this week in Ibsen’s great
social drama. “Ghosts," thus
giving the present generation of play
goers an opportunity to see a fine
performance of a play that agitated
their fathers and mothers. The Pub- j
lie Library presents a list of references i
to material concerning the play, the
dramatist and the actress, which may
be found in the reference and cir
culating collections of the central
library.
♦ “Heredity is nemesis without
her mask, the last of the Fates,
and the most terrible.”
Ibsen and His Works.
HENRIK IBSEN, by Archibald Hen
derson. (In his “European Dra
matists.” 1926, p. 73-195.) ZYD.
H383e.
“Mr. Henderson shows much skill
In making clear the personality of the
man and individuality of the artist.”
HENRIK IBSEN, by Edward Dowden.
(In his “Essays. Modern and Eliza
bethan," 1910, p. 26-60.) ZY.
D752e.
• A critique by a distinguished scholar.
HENRIK IBSEN, by Georg Brandes.
(In his “Creative Spirits of the
Nineteenth Century,” 1923. p. 329
396.». ZY.B735C.
Dr. Brandes’ essay was written in ;
1883. after the publication of “Ghosts,” j
but before many of Ibsen's dramas j
were given to the world.
HENRIK IBSEN. Plays and Prob- {
lems, by Otto Heller. 1912. |
ZY51A.Ib74h.
Prof. Heller in his study particu- ;
larly stresses the social or problem i
plays and their bearing on every
day life.
HENRIK IBSEN, by Georg Brandes. i
1899. ZY51A.Ib.74b.
The distinguished Danish critic’s j
evaluation of Ibsen.
IBSEN, by Sir Edmund Gosse. 1907.
E.Ib75g.
One of the “Literary Lives" series
by the noted English scholar.
IBSEN IN ENGLAND, by M. A. Franc.
1919. ZY51A.Ib74f.
The writer makes this observation:
“Of all the artists of the nineteenth
century, Wagner and Ibsen stand out ,
as the best hated . . . Ibsen received
from all Europe fervent praise and !
bitter blame.” I
MODERN DRAMA IN EUROPE, by j
Storm Jameson. 1920. ZYD.J238m.
Stark Young, writing in the Yale j
Review at the time of its publication, '
says of Miss Jameson's study: “A 1
j sane book full of wise insistence on
the reality and profundity of vision
In dramatists, if they are to write j
at all.”
THE MODERN IBSEN, by H. J.
Weigand. 1925. ZY51A.Ib74w. j
Prof. Weigand designates this work i
as a "reconsideration” of Ibsen, be
ginning with "that trumpet blast call- j
ing society to account”—"the pillars j
of society.”
IBSEN, by Havelock Ellis. (In his *
“New Spirit,” 1921, p. 128-166.) j
E9EL56.
* This was published in 1890 and was j
rated by one critic as "a rare combi- !
nation of enthusiasm and tolerance.” i
THE QUINTESSENCE OP IBSEN
ISM; now completed to the death
of Ibsen, by G. B. Shaw. 1913.
ZY51 A.Ib74s.
Shaw's “exposition,” as he calls it,
of Ibsen was written for the Fabian
Society’s course of lectures in the
Spring of 1890 and later completed.
Ibsen: Magazine Articles.
IBSEN THE PLAYWRIGHT. by
Brander Matthews. Bookman 22;
568-575, February, 1906, and 23;
18-27, March, 1906.
IBSEN: JOURNEYMAN DRAMA
TIST. by H. L. Mencken. Dial 63:
323-326, October 11, 1917.
GHOSTS, a criticism. Catholic
World 142: 601, February, 1936.
GHOSTS, a criticism. Theatre Arts
Monthly 20: 97-98, February, 1936.
PORTRAIT OF IBSEN. Literary
Digest 121: 21, January 15, 1936.
Editions of Ghosts.
PROSE DRAMAS OF IBSEN, ed. by
William Archer. 1907. v. 2.
Y51D.Ib75.
v Shaw and others have used the
English translation as the basis for
their critical studies.
GHOSTS, ed. by William Archer.
1900. Y51D.Ib75g.E.
GHOSTS, ed. with introduction by
William Archer. 1928. Collected
Works, v. 7. Y51DJb75dg.E.
A DOLL'S HOUSE; Enemy of the
People; Ghosts, ed. by William
Archer. 1923. Modern library ]
. edition. Y51D.Ib75dge.E.
MEMORIAL EDITION OF THE
PLAYS OF IBSEN. 1930. Y51D.
Ib75a2.E.
Alia Nazimova:
Magazine Articles.
IBSEN'S WOMEN, by Alla Nazimova.
Independent 63: 909-914, October
17, 1907.
IBSEN ONCE AGAIN: Nazimova’*
Revival, by Clayton Hamilton.
Bookman 47: 426-431, June, 1918.
HOW A DULL, FAT LITTLE GIRL
BECAME A GREAT ACTRESS, by
M. B. Mullett. American Maga
zine 93: 18-19, April, 1922.
ARTISTS DON'T NEED RUFFLES,
by Katherine Roberts. Collier's
00: 9. December 10. 1932.
NAZIMOVA GOES A-TROUPING,
by Theron Bamberger. Delineator
128: 64-65, April. 1936.
PORTRAIT OF NAZIMOVA AS MRS.
ALVING IN "GHOSTS." Theatre
Arts Monthly 20: 117, February,
« 1936.
j
»
ight all the time in his bidding. We
Ind every player, from the worst up
o the greatest master, making mls
akes that seem incredible when you
ice all four hands.
Furthermore, there are frequent
iroblems in the various stages of the
>idciing. to which there is no answer,
-’or instance, we recently had a letter
rom Alvin C. Mason of Chicago, a
fading bridge teacher and a Four Aces
mthusiast. asking the correct bid In
he following situation;
Opponents are not vulnerable: your
>ide is vulnerable, and you hold:
A K X x
W x x
♦ A Q x x x
A x x x
The opponent on your left opens
vith one diamond: your partner j
doubles, third hand bids a heart, and
now the problem is What you should
aid.
We give up. Obviously the hand Is
so strong that a bid should be made,
and yet there is no bid which is at all
satisfactory. We have shown the
hand to 20 or 30 leading players and
they ajl professed themselves stumped.
Of course, the hand is unusual, and
such a situation might never arise
again, but how about this one? South
deals and bids one spade holding:
A K J 10 x x x
W x
♦ A x x
A A Q x
North responds with two hearts.
What is South’s correct rebid? If j
South were allowed to bid 2(~j spades, j
the problem would be solved; other- j
wise, he must bid either two spades or
jump to three spades. If he bids two j
spades only, partner will pass with a
weak hand, and in the event that the
partner’s weak hand is something
like:
A 9 x
¥ A x x x x
♦ x x
A K x x x
—an easy game will be lost. If South
jumps to three spades, partner will |
undoubtedly continue and game will
be reached. Now should partner's j
hand be something along the follow- j
ing lines:
m a
• A J x x x
♦ K x x x
* x x x
—a substantial penalty will ensue, and
conceivably the hand will be doubled.
However, with this particular hand
we have a reasonably good answer,
which is: Your rebid should be based
upon your partner's temperament.
With a partner who Is a distinct
underbidder, you must chance three
spades, while with a pushing partner
two spades should suffice. But. of
course, if you happen to have an un
known! or inconsistent partner, you
might as well flip a coin.
This last point about basing your
bid in a close situation upon your
knowledge of your partner is one of
the most important things in the
game of contract. Incidentally, in any
close-bidding situation it is impas
sible for us, or any one else, to give
a categorical answer as to what is
the correct bid, since no two bridge
players have the same temperament
or the same characteristics.
The winning player is versatile and
not only varies hi* bidding in order
to fit in with his partner's, but also
varies it slightly in accordance with
his knowledge of the opponents.
Of course, in varying your bidding
you must be careful to let Jrour partner
know that you are doing it. For in
stance, A and B, who are strangers,
are to play as partners in a bridge
game. Before play starts A says, "Re
member, I am a distinct overbidder.” I
B says, “So am I." Nothing more j
is said and each player now decides
that he will take care of his partner's '
overbids by underbidding himself. As
a result they miss game after game |
and slam after slam. What they !
should do is to go one step farther |
and decide which one is to overbid |
as he normally would and which one
is to underbid to counteract it.
When you get to know a player real I
well you find out more about his bid
ding. For instance, there is one player
in New York who overbids all no
trump hands as follows: If he is to be
declarer, it averages one to two tricks;
if his partner is to be declarer, it
averages half a trick. But when the
contract is in a suit, the same player
becomes conservative. Now suppose
that you are playing with this man
as a partner and pick up the follow
i_1_- J .
* A J 9 8 x
V A J x
* K x x x
* Q
You have a sound opening one-spade
bid and make it. Second hand passes i
and your partner responds with one
notrump. Obviously, your hand is
decidedly unsuitable ior notrump and
ordinarily you should rebid to two
spades and hope that your partner
will pass. But with this man, you
must pass his one notrump. because
if you bid two spades, he is almost!
sure to bid either two or three no- i
trump.
(Copyright. 1936.)
The Four Acew will be pleased to answer
tetters from readers if a stamped •(3-cent*
self-addressed envelope is inclosed with
each communication.
The next article in this series will,
appear tomorrow.
MEMORIAL HIGHWAY
BUILDINGS APPROVED
Fine Arts Commission Acts on
Several Projects in and
Near Capital.
Pine Arte Commission approval has
been given to plans submitted by
Thomas MacDonald, chief of the
Bureau of Public Roads, for construc
tion of a group of buildings along
Mount Vernon Memorial highway,
south of Abingdon, for use as laborato
ries in road-testing experiments.
The development is slated to get
under way immediately. Victor Min
deleff. 7003 Clarendon road, Edgemoor,
Md., a local architect, designed the
buildings.
A revised design of a heroic figure,
to be placed in the niche at the grand
entrance to Arlington National Ceme
tery—the west end of the Arlington
Memorial Bridge development—also
received commission Indorsement. A.
A. Weinman designed the figure.
The general scheme for landscape
levelopment of the great plaza, formed
by the new Commerce, Labor and
Post Office Department Buildings, like
wise was approved.
Maj. Gilmore D. Clarke, landscape
architect member of the commission,
who has just been appointed for a
second four-year term by President
Roosevelt, was elected vice chairman.
A
OUR MOST IMPORTANT DUTY
Is the correct filling of prescriptions.
Filled with fresh pharmaceuticals . . .
filled by registered pharmacists . . .
rarofnllv fr»r apnirnrv
AGFA Cadet Cameras
You'll be taking . _ H
lou of pictures C ^k ^k H
now. These hand- 9 ■ ^B
some cameras take —
clear, clean-eut pie
tures in the popular ZV« by 3V« Inch Hh
size. lasy to operate. ■■
JIFFY KODAKS
Six-20 Model
*8.00
If you take your
picture-taklna se
riously. an East
man Kodak la
the thine for you.
Takes snapshots,
time exposures
and portraits.
Pictures are 3V4 by 3V4
Inches in size.
"| YOUR FILMS CAN IE DEVELOPED
CORRECTLY IUT ONCE . .. and they
art developed correctly at Peoples. We
use new precision, temperature controlled
mochines, end our professionol photo
graphers have perfected the art so that
the picture, just os you snap it, will
be the finished product.
MELVERN |
Fresh Strawberry /
and Pecon Krunch
ICE CREAM
20c fS. Hi
Frerh, ripe strawberries from
North Carolina and Louisiana.
Small pieces of pecan candy
put in the Pecan Krunch gives
it a delightful flavor. Accepted
by the Committee on Foods of
the American Medical Asso
ciation.
75c 50c
Squibb Watkins
Mineral Mulsified
Oil, pint Shampoo
59c S5«
60c
Hexasol
Saline
Laxative
49«
35c 50c
Campana Phillips
Italian Milk of
Balm Magnesia
34c
50c GRAHAM MAGNESIA TOOTH PASTE
and a 35c Value DENTOX TOOTH BRUSH
• THE TOOTH PASTE cleans, whitens, and brightens teeth 85c Value For Only
... and helps counteract tooth-destroying mouth acids.
• THE TOOTH BRUSH has fine quality bristles, securely
set in colored handles. Choice of oval or tufted shape. In
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imOTHER’S DAY
sunoflv mav io>
maKe NCR yPURC
Happy With DCLBCIOU5
ABex of CAnDY
Gold Craft
Chocolates
80cp,un<|
Nuts, caramels, nougatines,
creams, and fruits—coated with
milk and dark chocolate. A
lovely box, with a picture of a
mother on the top.
r~ni _
Mother’s Day Box
Gold Craft Chocolates
Ono and
Ono-Quart*r Pound*..
Gold Craft’s famous assortment of milk and
dark chocolates.. .in a truly beautiful box.
Pale pink, in a lovely pearl-finish covering
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Myra Monet
Chocolates
hand
Caramels, nougats, jellies, nuts,
clusters, marshmallows, and
other pieces. Choice of two
beautiful designs of boxes! A
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Mother’s Day Box
Gold Craft Chocolates
'I-00™
A really fine assortment of fruits,
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Satin Heart Box
$1.25
On* and 1
On*-Half Pound* ■
She’ll love this satin box with
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the wonderful assortment of
milk and dark chocolates.
■ — - - - J
Mother’s Day Box
Gold Craft Chocolates
*1 00 p..„
Almonds, Brazil nuts, caramels,
creams, and other tempting pieces,
coated with milk and dark chocolate.
A handsome "pearl-finish” box, with
bow.
There's No Better Nor More Effective Aspirin
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Peoples 5-Grain
Aspirin Tablets
60c VALUE—BOTTLE OF 100
Depend on this fine quality
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POPEYE
LAMPS
Complete « ^ ^ ^
With Cord * 1 .IQ
and Shode^.. •••7
The children will love to have
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their room. Popeye stands at
the base . . . and it's Popeye
who’s chasing Wimpy
around the shade.
4
75c Fletchers Castoria -.50c
60c La Lasine Antiseptic.49c
75c McElroys Eye Lotion.49c
55c Ponds Skin Freshener.42c
60c Elcaya Creams - -. 53c
83c Tangee Cream or Cake Rouge-75c
$1.25 Absorbine Junior-94c
25c Blue Jay Corn Plasters-21c
50c Pebeco Tooth Paste.39c
25c Dew Liquid Deodorant-21c
25c Cascarets Laxative Tablets.19c
$1.00 Graham Milk of Magnesia, quart - . 69c
50c Calox Tooth Powder..39c
50c X-Bazin Cream Depilatory.43c
60c Swamp Root-45c
$1.00 Waterbary Compound, pint-83c
$1.10 Lady Esther Face Powder.88c
50c Conti Castile Shampoo.39c
50c Barbasol Shaving Cream.39c
25c Squibb Baby Talcum —.21c
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Hose Nozzles
19«
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ROTARY
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An Exceptional Value, Well Made
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Peoplet
I Price_
Water your lawn daily to make
sure ot having a beautiful, green ,
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Relax Comfortably in One of These
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BEACH CHAIRS_98c
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.... 98®
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PENNSYLVANIA
Pressure Packed
Tennis Balls
40c; 3 for $1.15
Tee-off with CLOVER LEAF
GOLF
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25cesch
3 for 69c
These accurate
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golf balls are the
choice of seasoned
player*. Dimple or
mesh design.
Ice Cream Freezers
Make* Enough a a
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Twelve People_
Two-quart capacity mixers, heavily galvanized to
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1 UBBEY SAFEDGE
I TUMBLERS
39cDozen 3 dozen, $1.00
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| A soft _ Exceptionally
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You’ll need one of these chamois for washing
mirrors and other household articles when you do
your Spring cleaning . . . you’ll need one for
washing the car, too.
SPONGES_19c and 39c
* ;

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