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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 14, 1936, Image 49

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Claudette Colbert Gets
$150,000 for Her Role
Star Moans She’s a “City Girl” After
“Roughing It” ' on Location for
“Under Two Flags.”
BY SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD. May 14 (N.A.N.A.).—Facts about a picture you are see
ing—"Under Two Flags" . . . Claudette Colbert received $150,000 for
portraying Ouida's heroine, “Cigarette” . . . this is the first time
that the actress, who is a native of France, has played the part of
a French girl. Two goats were born on location at Yuma—one received the
name ‘Claudie,' the other, ‘Ronnie,’ after Ronald Colman ... the first night
/Incnet Mice fnilTlrf Q I "I .1- . I .1 I I — ■ — ——.
scorpion in her tent... all the camels
In California (44) were hired for the
picture ... Victor McLaglen became so
Interested In the short wave radio
Bets used for communication between
studio and Yuma location, he decided
to add a radio unit to "McLaglen's
army,” already boasting a cavalry unit,
airplane unit and Red Cross unit . . .
Doris Duke Cromwell, millionaire
heiress, visited the set and was al
most knocked down by a rush of Arab
extras seeking refuge from a kicking
horse.
Pood consumed
ten location, ap
proximately 4,000
pounds a day. was
trucked 288 miles
from Los Angeles
In refriger a t e d
cars. Prominent
among the nour
ishment items—
2*4 tons of sugar,
277 cows, 6,203
chickens, 48
squabs, 400
pounds of oat
meal, 1,000 boxes
of corn flakes,
75,000-odd loaves
Shrilah Graham
©f bread and 150 pies. So all the
principal members of the cast lost
weight . . . $1,125,000 was spent on
the picture . . . Over 250,000 feet of
negative was shot and cut down to
10,000 ... A press party in the desert,
attended by your misguided cor
respondent, was broken up by a parti
cularly nasty sand storm, and news
paper ladies and gentlemen savored
the delights of sand in the teeth—
and sandwiches.
When the picture was over, and
the sand-coated company returned
home to Hollywood, Claudette Colbert
breathed a sigh of relief and ex
pressed herself as follows:
• "If you expect me to say I like
making that type of picture, you’re
mistaken. I’m a city girl.”
Ronald Colman. most stoical of all
film stars, neither liked nor disliked
the gruelling experience. "I make the
best of any place I'm in,” he said.
Victor McLaglen expressed sorrow
at the return to civilization. ‘‘I like
locations tough.” he said, “the
tougher the better," and sped away in
a luxurious car to his well-furnished
manor in La Canada Hills, northwest
of Pasadena.
Hollywood oddities . . . Allan Jones
was a coal man before becoming a
film actor . . . Selling private tele
phone numbers of stars is one of the
most profitable businesses in Holly
wood ... A guest phone dangles
above the iron gate of Mr. and Mrs.
Warren Williams’ Encino estate so
welcome visitors may announce them
selves and be admitted . . . Johnny
Weissmuller seen—and heard—teach
ing an admiring group of children the
“Tarzan" call . . . With few excep
tions, beginning and end titles of films
manufactured in Hollywood are made
by the Consolidated Film Co., and not
as you might think, in the home
studio.
A factory in town that specializes in
sound effects sells 50 different types
of door slams. According to an exec
utive, the sound effect most in de
mand at the studios is the sock on
the jaw, of which the firm keeps a
wide variety in stock—hard, soft and
knockout socks, all made artificially.
During the making of "Dancing Pi
rate.” the company received an order
from Jock Whitney's outfit for the
sound of frogs croaking. Some one
must have slipped up on the job, be
cause when the sound effect arrived,
it turned out to be the noise of
crickets chirping!
"Heavy” Man Noel Madison, for
merly of Broadway, owns an exclusive
athletic club for butlers only . . . every
one Is so successful In Hollywood that
even the newsboys smoke cigars . . ,
Author Bill Lipscomb, who is more or
less a teetotaler, related that he saw
a bungalow on a moving truck, inside
of which four people were having a
wild party . . . Cartoonist Feg Murray
takes his ping-pong table with him
when visiting folks less burdened with
possessions . . . Pink Tomlin’s agent is
called Coy Poe . . . Wee Georgia Stone
spent four hours a day for three
months making up for the role of the
cat in "Anthony Adverse.” And he
only speaks three lines in the picture
... to get regular work—at $15 a day—
dress extras must possess wardrobes
valued at $1,500.
A handsome Egyptian potentate
visited Isabel Jewell on the set of
"Lost Horizon.” He asked the actress
to name a gift he could send her from
the land of the Nile. "Send me a
camel,” Isabel murmured, mischiev
ously. A few days ago Miss Jewell re
ceived notification that the camel is
on its way to Hollywood.
(Copyright, 1 !*:{*>. by the North American
Newspaper Alliance. Inc.)
MERCHANT OF VENICE
IS SPLENDIDLY ACTED
Children's Community Theater
Players Seen in Notable Pro
duction of Classic.
f A GAIN the plea of "Mercy droppeth
as a gentle rain from Heaven”
echoed across the boards, and again
vengeance was confounded as the
Children’s Community Theater gave
their own version of "The Merchant of
Venice” in the auditorium of Roosevelt
High School last night.
As before, the presentation was an
artistic success—a complete vindi
cation of a method and of a group
of earnest and enthuiastic youngsters
working in complete harmony for a
desired end.
To attempt to single out certain
Individuals for extra commendation
from a cast so entirely in accord and
of such a high level of acting ability
would be unfair to the larger number
whose participation was so essential
and so well done; yet as in life, there
are a few figures who cut a wider
swath on any stage.
Frances Shiflet as Shylock, Shylock
the crafty one making his unholy
demands and lusting in the glory of
his vengeance, Shylock the broken
old man tottering off stage. Miss
Shiflet was each, truly and wholly.
Dorothy Ann Washington as his lovely
end entrancing daughter. Antonina
De Luca as Portia, the rich, yet clever
young lady. How any young husband
could fail to detect her beauty beneath
any sort of disguise is beyond com
prehension. Jean Holzbelerlein as
that husband who was so sorely
tested In the struggle between love
and gratitude. Pauline Hurley as
Antonio, who came near to giving up
his life for his friend.
All these and many more parade
across the stage In the rich glory of
their costumes, living the life of old
Venice in all its fullness. If such
results can be obtained from the
method employed by this group It
Is to be earnestly hoped that it may
be more widely employed both here
and elsewhere. —R. D.
WASHINGTON PLAYERS
IN ATLANTIC CITY EVENT
'Vf EMBERS of the original Wash
ington Community Players cast
will go to Atlantic City on Thursday,
May 28, to appear at the Auditorium
ball room in a performance of “Six
Characters," by Edwin R. Heiss, as
one of the outstanding events in the
Conference on Social Work, under the
auspices of the Family Welfare Asso
ciation of America and the National
Committee of Volunteers In Social
Work to be held there beginning
May 25.
Among the popular Washington
players appearing in this series of
character sketches are Maurice Jar
vis, George Farrington, Ted Freter,
Barry Blutstein, Yerby Pannill, Lois
Alexander, Edythe Lazroff Goldman
and others.
INDIAN FETE SCHEDULED
Hava jo, Pueblo and Hopi Tribes
men to Present Dances.
An Indian festival will be staged
at the Sylvan Theater Saturday at
8 p.m. under auspices of the Bureau
of Indian Affairs, Interior Depart
ment. Native dances and rituals will
be presented by representatives of
the Navajo, Pueblo and Hopi nations
here for a conference on Indian
matters.
T. A. Walters, First Assistant Sec
retary of the Interior, will be master
of ceremonies and John Collier, com
misaioner of Iadlas affairs, will give
a short address. About M Indians
lltS participate.
’ )

Cruise Music
STEPHEN LeSIEUR,
Washington orchestra leader,
and his musicians, will supply
the dance music aboard the
Wilson Line steamer, “City of
Washington,” this Summer.
There will be a moonlight
cruise every night, starting at
8:30 o’clock.
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—"Three Men on a Horse,”
at 8:30 pm.
Palace—"These Three,” at 12:15,
2:35, 4:55, 7:15 and 9:35 p.m.
Earle—"Thirteen Hours by Air,” at
11 a.m., 1:35, 4:20, 7:05 and 9:50 p.m.
Stage shows at 12:45, 3:30, 6:20 and
9:05 pm.
Loew’s Fox—"Big Brown Eyes,” at
10:45 a.m., 1:30, 4:30, 7:05 and 9:55
pm. Stage shows at 12:40, 3:30, 6:20
and 9:05 pm.
R-K-O Keith’s—"The Ex - Mrs.
Bradford,” at 11:42 a.m., 1:44, 3.46.
5:48, 7:50 and 9:52 p.m.
Metropolitan—"Mr. Deeds Goes to
Town,” at 10:30 am., 12:35, 2:40, 4:55,
7:15 and 9:30 p.m.
Belasco—"Ecstasy,” at 12:05, 2:05,
4:05, 6:85, 8:05 and 10:05 p.m.
Columbia—“Captain January,” at
11:55 a.m., 1:55, 3;50, 5:50, 7:45 and
9:45 p.m.
Tivoli—"Rhodes," at 2, 3:55, 6:55,
7:50 and 9:50 p.m.
Ambassador—“Robin Hood of El
dorado,” at 6:15, 8 and 9:55 p.m.
LitUe—“LitUe Women,” at 11:12
am., 1:18, 3:19, 5:23, 7:27 and 9:31
pm.
Howard—"Another Pace,” at 12:30,
2, 5:30, 8 and 10:30 p.m. Stage shows
at 1:45, 4:15, 6:45 and 9:15 pm.
Piano Teachers Busy.
Piano teachers of Germany are again
coming into their own as the result
of the government sponsorship of a
revival of culture in the home. This
in turn has increased the demand for
pianos, especially the miniature ones
which fit into small rooms.
DANCING.
MAE DAVISON.
Ball room classes. Tues. and Thurs.
Teachlnc. 8 to 9. Practice. 9 to 11.
Tap and children's classes. S3 mo.
PrlY l1^9°^8|t,StwnOW f°rNSaPtr,!n3,3^VteW
EDWARD F. MILLER STUDIO
814 17rti St. N.W. Na. 8093
_”11 It It Danced W* Teach IV
CANELLIS' DANCE STUDIOS
MT 15th St. N.W District 7MB
19 PRIVATE LISBON! <19 011
U IN DANCING fU.VU
» azARxi ion
v
I
Popular Play
Again Comes
To National
Offerings for Week
At Theaters Headed
by ‘Tobacco Road/
“'T'OBACCO ROAD,’* which re
cently played a highly successful
engagement at the National Theater
and left only because of previous
bookings for both the production and
the theater, will return to the E street
play house Sunday night for one
week.
The widely-discussed drama will be
done on this return engagement by
the same cast that played here be
fore. Henry Hull, the original New
York star, Is in the leading role and
his suporting cast Includes Mary
Servoss, Fiske O’Hara, Priscilla
Knowles and Leon Ames.
•Tobacco Road” will play matinees
on Wednesday and Saturday after
non. -
John Boles, romantic singing star
of the stage and screen, will appear
at Loew’s Fox Theater, starting to
morrow. in both roles. His personal
appearance is the headline attraction
of the stage show and he will be
seen on the screen, with Wallace Beery
and Barbara Stanwyck, In “A Message
to Garcia,” film story of the true ad
venture which changed the destiny
of three nations. Other entertain
ment on the stage will be provided
by Collins and Peterson, comics;
Sybil Bownnan, late funster in Earl
Carroll’s “Sketch Book,” and the Don
Costello revue.
The Earle Theater’s new vaudeville
bill, opening tomorrow, will have two
headliners, Grade Barrie and Cluff
Edwards, both of whom were recently
featured in George White’s “Scandals,”
and who have a lot of friends in
town. The screen attraction will be
“The Case Against Mrs. Ames,” de
tailing the story of a woman mixed
up in murder accusations and court
rooms. The tale is by Arthur Somers
Roche and George Brent and Made
leine Carroll are starred.
Janet Gaynor and Robert Taylor
form the new romantic team starred
in “Small Town Girl," which starts
its local engagement tomorrow at
the Palace. Binnie Barnes and Lewis
Stone have Important supporting
roles in the M-G-M plcturization of
the Ben Ames Williams novel, which
recently was carried in The Star in
serial form. It’s the story of a small
town girl and a big-city boy who
married in haste and repented at
leisure.
“Dancing Pirate.” new musical
romance filmed entirely in the new
Technicolor process, comes to R-K-0
Keith’s tomorrow. Frank Morgan has
the principal comedy role, and the
cast is headed by Charles Collins,
late of New York stage hits, and
Steffi Duna, star of "La Cucaracha,"
the short which was the first all
color film made by the new process.
"Times Square Playboy,* a new
Warner Bros, comedy with its plot
derived from “Home Towners,” a
Stage success of George M. Cohan’s,
opens tomorrow at the Metropolitan
Theater. Warren William is the play
boy, June Travis the night club singer,
who is the apple of his eye, and Gene
and. Kathleen Lockhart, the home
towners.
“Trail of the Lonesome Pine, the
same story of mountain feuds, now
filmed entirely In Technicolor, which
recently had a successful week at
the Palace, returns downtown to
morrow to open at the Columbia.
Sylvia Sidney, Henry Fonda, Fred
MacMurray and Fred Stone are the
principal players.
“Ecstasy,“ the widely discussed film
about the young lady who went swim
ming, continues into its fourth week
at the Belasco.
“Of Human Bondage,” with Leslie
Howard and Bette Davis, starts Sun
day at the Little Theater.
Fats Waller brings his band to the
Howard Theater tomorrow, to head
line the stage show for one week.
FRATERNITY TO DANCE
Delta Sigma Pi of Georgetown
to Honor Officers.
The international fraternity of
Delta Sigma Pi, Mu Chapter, of
Georgetown University, will hold Its
final formal dance of the year in the
Hamilton Hotel at 8 p.m. Saturday
In honor of new officers.
Those to be honored include Patrick
G. Rinaldi, headmaster; Davis Gil
sinn, senior warden; Robert Wilks,
junior warden; Thomas Bayard, Jr.,
scribe; John Shelton, treasurer; Wil
liam Bryson, historian, and Joseph
Carbeau, chancellor,
3RD
KAMCnry
Now ftauilh Shorn ****
THi MTUMIONAL PRIZE WINNINC RIM
latasy
The pletire they
banned ... A tragic
drama of a woman who
crated for lore.
GAYETY BURLESK
NOW PLAYING
FINAL WEEK OF SEASON
SAM RAYNOR
MURRAY BRISCOE
LILLIAN DIXON
^VtS1?kM0own
ON THE BAY
WILL OPEN
SATURDAY
Salt Water Bathing
Dancing—Amusements
Half-Mile Fishing Pier
FREE PARKING
/-„. _ Ae beer to the
/ inN Iteeihere threecb
t Ibl/S Enreasz
Maryland.
ROUND TRIP
A One Day Only
Be tea Leate 40S Iltb Street N.W.
FOB INFORMATION CALL
NAtional 0213_
l
Comedienne
SYBIL BOWMAN,
Who recently was a featured
funster in Earl Carroll’s
“Sketch Book,” comes to
Loew’s Fox tomorrow, where
her act will be one of the
features of the week’s stage
show.
STUDIO FOR CHILDREN
IN DRAMATIC PROGRAM
'T'HE Children’s Studio of Speech and
Dramatic Art, under- the direc
tion of Rose Robison Cohen, will pre
sent a program of one-act plays at 3:3(1
Saturday afternoon at the Burlington
Hotel, 1120 Vermont avenue northwest
The plays will be enacted and staged
by children, all under 12 years of age
“The Birthday of the Infanta,’
adapted from the story by Oscai
Wilde, will be played by Phyllis Rands
as the Infanta, Doris Goldberg as the
Duchess, Nora Ann George as the
Count, Priscilla Makela as the Cham
berlain, Marilyn Sirota as the Moorish
Page, and the Fantastic will be por
trayed by Mildred Sirota.
“The Clown of Doodle-Doo.*’ a
play of lighter vein, and in direct
contrast to the tragic birthday of the
Infanta, will be plyed by Evelyn
Cohen, Beatrice Goldman, Dori!
Goldberg. Marilyn Sirota, Mildred
Sirota, Miriam Shapiro, Vivian Mar
golis. Sheila Kaminsky, Meurice Cohr
and Norma Lee Cohn.
“Lucy Locket" is based on the
nursery rhyme, and will be enacted
by the younger members of the Sat
urday class.
Harold Colbom has designed the
costumes for "The Birthday of the
Infanta,” and also has charge of the
stage.
ACADEMY of rer«Sf 8?Bo ^hEoton,,,
E. Lawrence Phillips' Theatre Beautiful
Continuous Prom 4:30 P M
•'THE INFORMER " with VICTOR McLAG
LEN HEATHER ANGEL. PRESTON
FOSTER and MARGOT GRAHAMS.
JACK HULBERT In "ALIAS BULLDOG
DRUMMOND. ' with FAY WRAY.
AC til EV 50.1 7th St. S.W.
AonLLI National 4376
SYLVIA SIDNEY In “MARY BURNSl
FUGITIVE."_
1CUTAM CLARENDON M.
Aon I UN ERANCHOT TONE. MADGE
EVANS In ‘‘EXCLUSIVE 8TORY."
TADAIINA nth A n. c Art s.E
LAKUL1NA "ip you could only
COOK.” and ‘THE RED SALUTE "
(NEW) CIRCLE nm Wea»*o5iw
AL JOLSON And SYBIL JASON in “THE
SINGING KIP.** News.
DUMBARTON cEarkoablk'jean
HARLOW MYRNA LOY in "WIPE VS.
SECRETARY.” Comedy. Shows, ? and 9.
FAIRI.AWN anacostu. d. c.
RUBY KEELER In "COLLEEN."_
| ITT! C 9th Between F and G
1*1 I I Ll. Aroustlron Fonlnued
KATHARINE HEPBURN in
“LITTLE WOMEN.”
DDINfCCC 1119 B St. N.E.
rnlNLUM NORMA SHEARER In
•SMILIN' THROUGH." RALPH
FORBES In “ILL NAME THE MUR
DERER.”_
crrn 8S44 Georrla Are.
jtvU Sneer Sprint Md.
Continuous From fi:00 P M.
"FANG AND CLAW.”
FRANK BUCK
Also "DANGEROUS INTRIGUE ”
RALPH BELLAMY. GLORIA SHEA.
CTANTflN «th and C Sts. N.E.
31 AN I UN Finest Sonnd Equipment
Continuous From 5:30 P.M.
BILL BOYD in "FEDERAL AGENT” with
IRENE WARE GARY COOPER and
ANN HARDING In "PETER IBBETSON "
With JOHN HALLIDAY and DICKIE
MOORE._
STATE-BETHESDA^bHIta m"
BING CROSBY. CHARLIE RUGGLES In
“ANYTHING GOES.”
_Also Comedy and Novelty.
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
STATE TodaT LEE
FREDDIE I WHEELER and
BARTHOLOMEW I WQOLSEY
In "LITTLE LORD . v ‘2TT t tpu »
FAUNTLEROY. I STLLY BILLIES _
wTtrnsi a 4th and Butternut Sts.
TAlvUMA No Parkin* Trnublei
CLARK GABLE and MYRNA LOY in
“WIFE VS. SECRETARY.”
Heierted Short Subjects.__
“ K NFir flth
a mrruunumr. tom
, william Oaraan. “Man Hunt.__
caMfo mt "an
fi Mae West. Victor McLaglen. Klon
.£ dike Annie."___
•S TorTnc HYATTSVTLLF md.
w AKLAI'b Today-Tomorrow
«+• pat O'Brien. James Cagney. Ceiling
O Zero.”--——
§ RICHMOND
"JS Dionne Quintuplets. “Country Doctor,
g MILO “"W "d „
AMBASSADOR 45th coi\2Sk
• WARNER BAXTER in ' ROBIN HOOD
OP EL DORADO.'' “March of
Time." -
APOLLO Phon* LL'jWTS
.MARLENE DIETRICH and GARY
COOPER in "DESIRE."_
M) 11/11 Alj Conn. Ire. A McKinley
9 AVALUn St. N.W. Cl. 3600
H6 First Shew Starts 6:00 P.M.
W WARNER BAXTER in "PRISONER
r_ OP SHARK ISLAND "__
< AVENUE GRAND
U4 Matinee. 3:00 P.M.
E RICHARD ARLEN in "THREE LIVE
OHOOTS.".
CENTOA1 435 oth St. N.W.
Lbn I KAL Phone Me. *641
--f AL JOL80N In "SINGING KID."
Jg "March of Time."_
2 COLONY 2? ft* *gM®
M" WARNER BAXTER in "PRISONER
OP SHARK ISLAND." .__
fig HOME Pto?eCLBti«3&
r.y ROCHELLE HUDSON. HARRY RICH
S MAN in "MUSIC GOES ROUND."
9 DCklV Penna. Arena* B E.
fig rbnn Between Oth and 7th Sta.
33 Matinee. 3:00 P.M.
WALTER HUSTON in "RHODES.”
Popeye,
^ CAVnV «4th St A Col. Rd. N.W.
3AVUI Phone CoL 4D6*
RICHARD ARLEN in "THREE LIVE
GHOSTS."
TIVOL* ,4thpS,.J^k,RsJoNW
Matinee. 3:00 P.M.
WALTER HUSTON In "RHODES”
VhDIf Oh- AY*. * Qnebee
IUKA Place N.W Cel. 4016
PAUL KELLY and ARLINE JUDGE
In “HERE COMES TROUBLE."
JESSE THEATER ,8?„* 4S!"4
on “ROSE MARIE,”
Xe JEANETTE MacDONALD. NELSON
S EDDY. Short Subjects.
s SYLVAN *■**«• I
B “IT HAD TO HAPPEN,”
S GEORGE RAPT and ROSALIND
Z Comedy^ Novelty.
S PALM THEATER DKSrT
GQ “COLLEEN.”
RUBY KEELER and DICK POWELL.
V
Laboratory
Theater Is
New in Field
Pen Women to Have
Facilities to Try
Local Products.
A NEW “laboratory little theater”
is to be established in the Dis
trict, sponsored by the League of
American Pen Women, for the purpose
of trying out selected one-act plays by
members of the league, before the
manuscripts are sent to publishers.
The theater, complete with stage
and adequate seating capacity, is
to be located in the former ball room
of the Burlington Hotel, where the
pen women now are established In
their new headquarters.
The “laboratory theater” is to apply
its' first “test” Friday night. May
22, when three plays—“Overtones,”
by Alice Gerstenberg of Chicago; "I
Shall Be Waiting,” by Florence R.
Kahn of Baltimore, and “Morning
Devotions,” by Emily Maddox of Wash
ington—will be presented under the
direction of Rose Robison Cohen.
Increasing interest In one-act plays,
according to Mrs. Cohen, has in
creased the need for a local "labora
tory theater," where dramatists may
try out their efforts in actual produc
tion. Criticisms of the plays will rest
entirely with the audience, which will
be invited only because of its Interest
In the theater, and will consist princi
pally of editors, publishers, critics
and members of the Pen Women’s
League.
The best talent available in the
District will be invited to participate
in the plays. Those to be presented
on the first program will be done by
Yerby Pannill. Joanne Adams, Edythe
Goldman and Ten! Sorel, in “Over
tones”; John Mann, Andrew Dent.
Milton Hirschfield, Eleanor Cox
Karsten and Marshall Adams, in “I
Shall be Waiting,” and Mrs. Karsten
and Mr. Mann in “Morning De
j votions.”
Writers to Hold Banquet.
The recently organized Professional
Writers’ Club of the Y. W. C. A. will
hold a banquet and program of
dramatic skits May 26 in Barker tfall.
Seventeenth and K streets. Mary
Margaret Feldman will preside.
Mahan’s Car for Tobacco.
TACOMA, Wash. CP). — William
Mahan, off to McNeil Island Prison
to serve 60 years for kidnaping George
Weyerhaueser, offered to trade his
sedan for enough tobacco to last him
through the term. United States Mar
shal A. J. Chltty said the car had a
clear title except for a year's storage,
but there were no takers.
r
Genealogical Society Dinner.
The National Genealogical Society
will hold its annual dinner at 6 p.m.
Saturday in the Y. W. C. A. Building,
Seventeenth and $ streets. Ances
tral charts, coats of arms and copies
of valuable public and private records
of genealogy will be displayed. Mrs.
Andrew J. Sanford heads a committee
in charge of arrangements.
Art School Plans Exhibit.
The Crltcher Art School will hold
Its Anal exhibition of students’ work
this year in the school studios, 1726
Connecticut avenue, for one week, be
ginning Saturday afternoon. The ex
hibit will consist of the work of the
juniors, seniors and professionals
studying at the school. The public
is invited to attend.
$4.00 Down $1.00 Weekly
A thriller for 2 hours: Friday night, 7 till 9 only. A complete 3 rooms !
in one. Handsome studio couch that opens to either a full-size bed or |
into 2 separate twin beds. Choice brown, green or rust covered, with
inner spring mattress, gateleg table, 4 Windsor chairs finished in maple
or walnut, bridge lamp and shade, one end table. All for $39.
-— —------—V
Open We Deliver
TUESDAY FREE !
FRIDAY «»'FURNrrURE _ Everywhere
Tiii 9p.m. 1245-47 Wisconsin Ave. ; ~ij!"
Veek Dim Till A PM SO MlleS
---- Georgetown, D. C. ---
THE FIRST DANCING |
MUSICAL IN 100%^
NEW

PIONEER PICTURES
presente
W K
■ A singing, swing
ing, romance o/
Old California . ..
Gayety, laughter,
\ danger and love
l ... . soaring on
(rainbow wings to
golden new worlds
f of rapturous en
; chantment... AN \
f EVENT IN THE\ '
I WORLD OF THE %
| THEATRE t
Ill X
CHARLES COLLINS j
New dancing sensation of the screen M
FRANK MORGAN^
Laugh star of 50 hits B1
STEFFI DUN A]
The girl of “La Cucaracha " H
LUIS ALBI1NI jfl
VICTOB VABCONI ^B
JACK LA BUB BH
. . . Old downs of
gosgaoas dancing girls.
i ■KBBpCTijflpMI
★ ^
Gloriously
L Beautiful!
f IMAGINE, IN COLOR! Th.^Hth-uUnt "Btaa,
Walts", dancad by doaana of gixla and men in a dreamy,
blae haaa at aUrery moonlight... THE DANCE OF THE
CABALLEROS, to a tart your too* tapping and make year
k heart glad...THE CATCHY "HUAFANSO", a fox-trot*
tango atepped to the throbbing rhythm ola land oiloyeia..*
THE CASF1N0 FINALE, tho wadding danoa and pieoeo 1
(ion... a aoriaa of aconaa to mako feminine hoarta (tend (HU.j
. backgrounded by a mighty chonu of eighty blended ee*oeei.
L
STARTS nTr/N fVnTITlT T’n ADDED attraction.. •
jks™??. 8X0KEITHS *•“—-■
*** ^ "The MARCH
LASTDAT - Opponito U. S. Tr.n.ury on 15th St AT TTUT'«
Wflikim POWELL I—AWHWIhi "Tim Eriiw. BRADFORDOF TIME
- ; - 7

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