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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 24, 1936, Image 58

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BIG TOP’S TOP MAN RECALLS HIS COLORFUL LIFE
_ — —
Career of Sam Gumpertz
Started in Washington
-1- “
Circus Manager, Skilled Raconteur, Rates
Morgan-Midget Story Best Press
Agent Stunt in History.
By John Jay Daly.
ERE is a man who looks into
the eyes of more men, women
and children, probably, than
any other man in the world.
He is Sam W. Gumpertz, vice president
and general manager of the Ringling
Bros, and Barnum & Bailey Combined
Circus—the Greatest Show on Earth.
Every day, six days a week, seven
months out of the year, Sam Gum
pertz pulls up a camp chair and sta
tions himself near the front door of
the circus and watches the people go
into the big top.
Every night Sam Gumpertz does the
same thing—watches the crowds. He
sees on an average of 30,000 people
file past him every day—a grand total
’ of 5.760,000 persons in the course of a
circus year.
Now Sam Gumpertz has been at this
business of watching the crowds for
50 years—half a century—five decades.
In the course of that time he has come
to know something of mob psychology,
mob formations and what it is the
people want.
Born in Washington several years
after the assassination of Abraham
Lincoln, Mr. Gumpertz started going
places "on his own’’ at the ripe old
age of 14. He has been at it ever since,
with six trips around the world to his
credit.
Now a man who has seen so many
persons as Mr. Gumpertz and is still
not tired looking at them comes very
near being a freak—though he has
never played in the side shows. On
the other hand, he has given to the
side shows and the big top some of the
strangest galaxies of humanity the
world has ever seen—for this is Mr.
Gumpertz's specialty, to go to far
away places and bring back unusual
specimens of humanity, like the Bon
toc headhunters, the wild men from
Borneo, the Somalilanders and the
giraffe-neck women.
Because he was a circus performer,
the general manager of the Greatest
Show on Earth has a soft spot in his
heart for all other circus performers;
but his interest does not end there—
for he went through almost every other
experience of the game. He was a
lithographer for two years—one of
those fellows who makes the big signs
in store windows; a ticket seller for
the same period of time, and then an
advance agent—ahead of the shows.
Eight years trouping the country,
visiting all the newspaper offices, glori
fying the great American institution
known as the circus, gave Sam Gum
pertz an all around education. And it
also taught him how to make the
American public circus-conscious. He
believes that the way to do that is
by employing plenty of newspaper
space and he gets it. He buys some
of it, and they give him the rest.
“Press agents, with me, get the right
of way,” Mr. Gumpertz says—"and the
newspaper boys and girls. They are
my pets. I’d rather have one good
newspaper story about the circus than
anything that could happen.”
Which led, naturally, into talk of
great publicity stunts—for the circus
feeds on publicity as the elephants on
hay.
In 50 years’ show business, Mr. Sam
Gumpertz delivers himself of the
opinion that the greatest publicity
stunt of all time happened right here
in Washington three years ago. That
was the placing of a midget in the
lap of Mr. John Pierpont Morgan of
the bouse of Morgan.
"Publicity stunts come and go, and
mostly they fade out in a week or
so—6ix w eeks at the highest—but this
Morgan-midget stunt promises to live
on forever. Why? Well, because it
united the smallest bit of femininity
and the biggest financial name in the
world.”
VfR GUMPERTZ chuckled: “Frank
Braden, one of the greatest press
agents in captivity, must get full
credit for placing the midget in Mor
gan’s lap; for he conceived the idea
and engineered the coup—but as a
former midshipman and a Army officer
he probably wanted to observe the
code and not take credit for plopping
a midget in J. P. Morgan’s lap in an
official inquiry room of the United
States Senate. Nevertheless, Frank
Braden did the job—and it was the
best ever done in this business. No
body can take that glory away from
him.”
In recalling that stunt, Mr. Gum
pertz claims it was the greatest piece
pi publicity the c^cus ever received.
VlfHEN a man sees 5,760,000 people
” in the course of a year, and 288,
000,000 in 50 years, his eye naturally
detects the abnormal. His brain regis
ters what will appeal to the curiosity
of the normal—and he manages to
bring the two together under the big
top.
This, in the language of the enter
tainment world, they call showman
ship.
Sam Gumpertz is a great showman.
While he sits there, day after day,
at the entrance to the circus, he
wonders what these great throngs
want to see. most of all, why they
come to see it, and when, if ever, they
will tire of the experience. They
never do—principally because the
master mind of the circus business is
always thinking up something new.
He is the living apostle of old P. T.
Barnum who had an uncanny sense of
what the public wanted.
You would never guess that Mr.
Gumpertz has been through the mill
to the extent of 50 years in the show
business. He celebrated his 50th year
in the game while the circus played
Washington the past week.
In a reminiscent mood, Mr. Gum
pertz crossed his legs, tilted back his
camp stool—one like the movie di
rectors use—and told how the Gum
pertz family left Washington years
ago to go out West and grow up with
the country.
Sam Gumpertz was 6 years old then.
The tribe left Washington with the
good wishes of a lot of old timers, and
landed in Sweetwater, Tex. At the
going-away party, the late George
Harvey, who was Sam Gumpertz's
godfather, staged a farewell banquet.
"I N THE great open spaces, little
A Sammy Gumpertz became a cow
boy—and that is what led him into
the circus. His mother died when he
was 14 and Sammy set out to become
a show rider. At that time Buffalo
Bill was setting up his first show, and
for two years this long, lean, lanky
boy showed the other kids all over the
country how to ride ’em cowboy style.
A local story In Washington, It de-1
veloped over night into a national
story—and then into an international
yam. It was carried on the front pages
of Le Temp6, in Paris, the Daily Mall
In London, and Der Tagblatt in Berlin.
Naturally, it hit the front pages of
every newspaper in America—and it
was illustrated. Some 80 famous car
toonists used it as material.
In the words of an eminent psychol
ogist, the Morgan-midget story was "a
natural”—and yet Frank Braden,
originator of the idea, dismisses the
gag with the dictum, "It just hap
pened.”
As Mr. Braden, who wears an An
napolis class ring—perhaps the oply
press agent to have such distinction—■
records the event for posterity, he
says: “It was an accident, a fluke, a
fabulous and Incredible incident in
the American scene—yet it was
planned. Planned in detail—and then
dropped.
“Why?”
Well, hear the former Annapolis
man and the Army officer who served
in the World War spin his own yarn:
“Don't get us wrong,” he warns. "A
press agent who could mislay an idea
like the placing of Lya Graf, tiny
German grand dame, in the lap of
J. Pierpont Morgan, would lose a bull
fiddle on an ice rink.
“ 'Twas an afternoon at the close of
May, 1933. and the grill room in the
National Press Club was comfortably
filled with newspaper men and visiting
firemen, such as I.
“Every one was laughing over the
juicy page 1 morsel of the day—testi
mony before the Senate Investigating
Committee to the effect that J. P.
Morgan & Co. had paid no income tax
the preceding year.
‘ INTRODUCED to several newspaper
men as the press agent handling
Washington for the circus’ imminent
engagement, some one made a wise
crack: ‘You should get Morgan under
the big top—when he gets through
with the Senate circus.’
"Discussion took over possible gags
to ballyhoo the show, featuring Mr.
Morgan as the No. 1 boy. the un
willing hero, the reluctant leading man
in a mass movement of the citizenry
toward the big top, due in the city a
day or so later.
"At that time, newspaper desk men
and news cameramen regarded a news
photograph of J. P. Morgan as a top
achievement. The great financier was
credited with having wrapped a cane
around a camera on shipboard not
long before. ‘Shooting J. P.’ w-as a job
entailing ingenuity and courage. The
New York boys who had borne the
brunt of the attack in their city knew
how tough the task was. The Wash
ington boys, however, had a different
attitude:
*‘ ‘How about Major Mite greeting
Morgan as he enters the committee
room’ one of them suggested. Major
Mite claims to be the world’s smallest
man, is about 23 years old and towers
that many inches over his shadow . . .
"Better than that,” I interposed,
"we’ve got Lya Graf with the circus
this year. She's a lovely midget lady
and ideal for any stunt, as she looks
the part, talks well, and has poise.
“I recall especially that word ‘poise.’
I liked it, and It did describe Lya. She
was never in a spot where she was
minus her savoir faire, her pint-size
savoir faire.
"Now that was an idea—to have Lya
Graf photographed with the great J.
P. Morgan—and I fell for it.
"Morgan’s staff and guards will
chase you a mile,” an old-timer said.
“Two days later, Lya Graf—tiny
star of the side-show—went tripping
along the corridor in the Senate Of
fice Building. She wras with her sis
ter, an attractive German girl of nor
mal size, and a German couple.
Lya had expressed a desire to see
the White House and was told she
had to get tickets at the Senate Of
fice Building: which accounted for
her presence there.
TJNSUSPECTINGLY, Lya’s clinking
dime-size heels beat there a ren
dezvous with Fame, or notoriety, or
what? Anyway, she had a date with
John Pierpont Morgan—and neither
one of them knew it.”
Frank Braden likes to let little Lya
Graf tell the rest of the story, as
she was the real eye-witness. Here
is the way she recounted her exper
ience to Clyde Ingalls, the side-show
manager, and to Braden—and this
is the first time it has ever been set
down in print:
"As I aproached the room where
the Senate Investigating Committee
was in session,” Lya says, "a big man
in a brown suit grabbed me. He said:
‘I want you to meet the richest man
in the world.’
“This man led me to Mr. Morgan.
The strange man lifted me—he start
ed to lift me—when Mr. Morgan
leaned over and helped me get in his
lap. He smiled, and said: ‘I’ve got
a little grand-daughter at home about
your size.’ Then he asked me where
I lived. I told him: ‘In a tent and on
trains—I’m with the circus.. .
At this point, Lya Graf slipped—
she was not pushed—off the financier’s
lap; but, as she tells the story, the
strange man came and helped her
back in Mr. Morgan’s lap. Then the
picture was taken—the picture that
constitutes the greatest publicity stunt
ever pulled.
As Sam Gumpertz thinks it over,
he claims this is the ace of publicity
stunts—and he says it is likely to
live forever. Only last week the New
York newspapers recalled the fact,
and is has a way of constantly pop
ping up.
Frank Braden, of course, doped it
all out, even if fate itself stepped in
and took it away from him.
Anyway, it goes down in circus his
tory as a honey—and circus lore is
replete with fancy how-de-does in
press-agentry.
There was that time, for instance,
when Roland Butler, general press
representative of the Ringling Broth
ers and Baraum and Bailey Com
bined Circus, pulled what is known
as the white baby camel stunt—one
of the most productive, from a publi
city standpoint, ever recorded.
The circus had just left a stand in
Northern New York—bound for Can
ada. When the show arrived in Canada
a newly-born white baby camel was
on the show train. There had been
no baby camel when the train left
New York. So it was claimed the
camel must have been born in Canada.
However, there w£s some doubt even
»
of this; for when the show' arrived in
Canada the baby had already been
born and was very much alive, and
kicking. So what? Where had the
birth taken place? Some argued it
was born while crossing the St. Law
rence River.
^HAT set the fertile mind of Roland
Butler to work. He got opinions
from everybody, including circus hands
and prominent local people in Can
ada, and an argument started threat
ening international complications.
The story reached its climax in Hali
fax. where the papers devoted columns
to the controversy. Letters to the
editor argued whether the camel was
an American or a Canadian. Then
came the christening—and judges
wTere selected to give the baby a
name. As a compromise it was called
Causa, a name submitted by a boy in
Truso, Nova Scotia. He had the
honor of pouring a bottle of milk
over the baby camel's head, in a ce.s
mony that brought out the greatest
circus crowd of all time in Canada.
Now these are the tales that Sam
Gumpertz tells us as he sits and
watches the crowds at the front
entrance to the circus—tales that
show how the American people fall
for everything connected with the
sawdust ring.
Old Dexter Fellows is perhaps the
best known of the publicity men, and
in a few days his book, "This Way to
the Circus,” will be off the press.
Dexter, in his day, has pulled many a
fancy press agent stunt, but his out
standing deed and contributijn to
circus history is the time when he
walked Old John, the oldest elephant
with the circus, from New York City
to Somers, N. Y., a distance of 40
miles, to visit the grave of the first
elephant brought to America. A
newspaper party accompanied Old
John and Dexter on their weird Jour- :
ney—and from the way Mr. Gumpertz
; tells It that was one of the grandest
publicity stunts on record, though not
the equal to the Morgan-midget stunt.
Out of that came the formation of a
Nation-wide organization, known as
the Morgan Midgiteers. They meet in
various cities at the time the circus
plays—and the national headquarters
are here In Washington, a tribe con
sisting of newspaper men who were
with Frank Braden when the original
stunt was doped out. Merle Evans,
bandmaster of the circus, composed
music for the Morgan Midgiteers’
marching song.
l^/JEN who can think up stunts like
these are welcomed to the circus.
Mr. Gumpertz tells of one of the out
standing press agents of all time—
Wells Hawks. For years Wells was
with the circus, but before that he
was with Dreamland, the largest
amusement park of its kind, at Coney
Island, a park run by the same Sam
Gumpertz What they wanted more
than anything else was a slogan. One
morning at 5 o’clock Mr. Gumpertz
walked out on the beath and found
Wells Hawks lying there, in revery:
“What you doing here?” Gum
pertz asked.
“I've been out here all night," Wells
Hawks said, "trying to dope out a
slogan for Dreamland—and I've got
it.”
"What is it?" Gumpertz asked.
“Everything New But the Ocean,
and That Changes Twice Daily," the
versatile Wells Hawks replied—and
that slogan was used as the advertis
ing line for Dreamland—until it
burned down in 1911.
Not long ago, in Miami, Fla., was
held a reunion of the only three men
who worked with the first Buffalo
Bill show—and they were Sam Gum
pertz, Dexter Fallows and Frank
Small, a press agent of the old school,
now in his 84th year.
Since those days, of course, the cir
cus has grown to be the greatest in
stitution of its kind in the world.
Mr. Gumpertz, sitting in his camp
chair, and letting hia mind run back
over the past, likes to tell of the new
order. He has, for Instance, under
his watchful eye some 1,600 persons—
358 performers, and the rest every
thing that la needed around a moving
town. His life is a process of pack
ing and unpacking, loading and re
loading, going places and seeing things.
As for horses, there are 480 baggage
horses and 220 ring stock—and ele
phants, and you know the rest. They
all travel together In 100 steel cars,
each car 80 feet long, which is three
times the length of the average rail
road car. Pullmans, flat cars and
stock cars make up the train—a train
that burns up the rails from one end
of the country to the other—and you
have on that train everything the
human heart desires, even to beauty
parlors and barber shops; but the
prise car of all is the hospital car,
the latest wrinkle Introduced by Sam
Gumpertz. It has three wards in
charge of a doctor, with two night
nurses and two day nurses. It is the
finest hospital car in the world.
/~)NE day with the circus a Russian
acrobat was Injured—a broken
shoulder blade. She and her hus
band were forced to part. “It almost
broke my heart to see those two peo
ple. in a strange land, and neither
one speaking our language, parting
with each other," says Mr. Gumpertz.
“So I decided to have a hospital car.
Now If a husband or wife gets hurt
they need not be separated—one left
behind In some city hospital while
the other travels. They can visit be
tween performances."
And about this visiting between
and after performances. Mr. Gum
pertz, in all hls long career with the
circuses, has come to believe that the
happiest hours of the circus people
are those hours after the last show .
when they can relax and reminisce
“Those are their happiest hours.”
he says. ‘•when, they can get together
and swap yarns • *
And those seem to be the happiest
hours of Sam Gumpertz when he can
lean back in his chair with a good
listener at his side and recount the
million and one experiences that have
been hls lot—off and on the lot.
He happens to be one of the grand
est story tellers in America, as well
as the logical successor to P. T. Bar- .
num. In his earlier days he pro
duced on Broadway the play that be
came the world's sensation—"Mrs.
Warren's Profession.” by George Ber
nard Shaw, with Arnold Daly and
Mary Shaw starred.
There again, times have changed.
They arrested Sam Gumpertz for put
ting on "Mrs. Warren's Profession.”
He laughs and says, ‘'Compare that .
script now with 'Tobacco Road.’ ”
While he was a theater man and
the owner of Dreamland, all that
means nothing now to Sam Gumpertz.
He has sawdust in his ears and hair
and cannot get it out. He started
out with the circus as a daredevil
rider and has come to be the top man
with the big top.
Training Carrier Pigeons
(Continued Prom Page 1.)
in this instance honors were about
even.
Speaking of radio, here's a peculiar
situation. Mr. Buscall says: Radio
beams interfere with the sense of
direction of carrier pigeons, according
to an experiment recently conducted
in Nantes, Prance.
’ It had been noticed by amateur
fanciers that homing pigeons experi
ence difficulty during electrical and
magnetic storms. It was decided to
observe the effect of radio waves on
the birds. Groups of pigeons were
freed close to the big Navy radio sta
tion, which was continuously broad
casting on a. 9,000-meter wave. The
pigeons showed signs of bewilderment.
Some veteran homing birds took as
long as three minutes to find their
direction.
According to Mr. Buscall. pigeons
find and fly their course much in the
manner of human pilots, but how
they do so no one knows.
The term, •'homing instinct,” is mis
leading, says Mr. Buscall. who is a
world authority on pigeon raising
and training. "There is more than
instinct to it. Let’s call it navigation.
Pilots have gadgets that tell them
where they are going. It is not far
fetched to say that pigeons have
instrument boards in their heads.
"They do not fly a blind, straight
course. • They navigate. Carrier
pigeons swing left or right to go
around storms, just as any good flyer
will do, and then pick up their course
again.
"What Divine ability enables them
to reach their goal with such amazing
accuracy? I don’t know. No one
does. It may have something to do
with their ears. It is a curious fact
that if you stuff their ears they can't
fly.”
^jARRIER pigeons have a great
deal of courage and intelligence.
They can outspeed hawks and cover
considerable distances. The longest
hop ever made in the United States
by these feathered messengers was
the 2,150-mile distance, as the dove
flies, between Maine and Texas, and
at an average rate of 700 miles a day.
This, by day-flying pigeons only.
“How are the “homers” trained?
In very simple, but ingenious, fashion
Mr. Buscall explains. Instruction
starts when the birds are 18 days
old. Each day some of them are
taken a certain distance from their
loft, released, and allowed to fly home.
Little by little the flying distance Is
increased until within a few weeks
they can fly a mile.
More specifically, first of all the
fledgling birds, or “squeakers,” are
let out of their loft and allowed to
sit on the landing board to get the
“feel” of their surroundings. During
the next few days they are allowed
to fly little by little, until at last they
achieve the desired distances, which
may be 5, 10 or 15 miles, according
to their natural ability.
Their speed at maturity ranges
from 50 to 55 miles an hour, depend
ing on weather and wind conditions.
In the new, improved message bag
the courageous little pilots can carry
up to three ounces of “mail.” This
type of bag is a stream-lined breast
harness which, unlike the old-time
capsule tied to the leg, offers very
little wind resistance.
The training of Army pigeons has
advanced at a great pace since the
World War. In 1918 it took from 14
to 20 days to "establish” birds at new
homing lofts. Today birtW can be
changed from one place to another
and "home” to their new residences
in two to three days.
J^ACINQ pigeons, then occasionally
referred to as "antwerps," were
introduced into the United States
about 1874, by a few Belgian lace
workers, living in and around Phila
delphia, who undertook the training
and racing of these birds purely as a
poor man’s sport. Their efforts met
with immediate success, and the Sport
of pigeon racing spread to nearby
communities and began to acquire a
certain popularity.
On November 8, 1881, a group of
sportsmen met in Philadelphia and
organized the first racing association,
uniting the fanciers of New York. Bos
ton and Philadelphia in a competitive
combine. In 1894 a similar combine
was formed in Chicago, and in 1910
the American Union was organized in
Detroit. The pioneer Philadelphia
combine grew into the present Inter
national Federation, with which the
present American Union and National
Association are affiliated through the
joint executive committee of live.
From a purely local sg>ort, pigeon
racing has grown to national and In
ternational proportions. There are
affiliated with the Amateur Racing
Pigeon Union over 600 local racing
clubs, which contain no less than 700
Individual fanciers. While It is im
possible, on account of the lack of a
uniform system of registration, to es
timate accurately the total number
of racing birds in this country, it is a
conservative statement that the num
ber considerably exceeds 500,000.
Racing birds are extensively used
both for sport and communication by
civilian fanciers. The War Depart
ment exercises no control over civilian
lofts, but maintains the most
relations with all. Signal Corps birds
compete freely in races and exhibi
tions with privately owned birds, and
the pigeon section of this office car- •
ries on the widest possible exchange
of information with Chilian fanciers.
How many homing pigeons were
used by the different armies dur
ing the World War? No less than
470,000. Of these, the United States
had 20,000, the allies 300,000 and the
central powers. 150.000.
In the St. Mihiel drive 567 American
birds were available for use of the
American forces. Many of these birds
were assigned to tanks, and. although
their training had been very brief, as
fog and rain made flying difficult. 90t
important messages were delivered by
these pigeons. Of the 202 birds used
in the tanks, 24 were lost or killed.
The majority of these losses were due
to long detention in training sections
and inexperienced handling. Three
hundred and eighty-three birds were
assigned to line troops of the 1st and
4th American Corps. While no record
of the actual number of messages de
livered by these birds is availably, their
work was such as to call forth, from
officers familiar with the exploits of
the pigeon service, general commenda!
tion upon the flying quality and stam
ina of the birds. The speed made by
them was excellent, in many instances
averaging a kilometer a minute, de
spite the fact that the weather was
the worst possible for pigeon flying.
On September 21 notice was given
of the now famous Meuse-Argonne
offensive. Training was commenced
immediately, but a notice of five days
is a very short time in which to settle
homers. Four hundred and forty-two
American birds were used in this of
fensive and 403 important messages
were delivered by these pigeons. The *
distance flown, owing to the cc»tant
ly changing position of the American
troops, varied from 20 to 50 kilometers.
No record is available of the actual
number of birds lost, but It is be
lieved that no more than 10 per cent
failed to return to their lofts, and
there is no record of an important
message hating gone astray.
In spite of the fact that frequently
changing loft positions made training
problems difflcut and weather condi*
tions were extremely unfavorable, tha
liaison work by the American birds in
the Meuse-Argonne drive was mora
than satisfactory, and certain individ
ual performances were nothing short
of marvelous. Pre-eminent was the
work of a pigeon named Big Tom on
the afternoon of October 21. Liber
ated at Grand Pre at 2:35 with an im
portant message during intense ma- #
chine gun and artillery action, the bird
delivered its message to the loft at
Rampont. a distance of 40 kilometers,
in 25 minutes. Upon examination it
was found that one leg had been shot
away and that the breast had been
pierced by a machine gun bullet. The
message tube, intact, was hanging by
the ligaments of the tom leg.
'T'HE work of the pigeons in the
World War can be considered as
highly satisfactory when we take into
account the fact that at that time
there was no training literature nor ,
any approved doctrines governing their
tactical employment. As a result,
many impossible missions were as
signed to the pigeon service during the
war, which resulted in some adverse
criticism of this service. In many
cases pigeons were hurriedly assigned
to posts with attacking regiments, bat
talions and even companies. They were
then expected to carry back informa
tion to the commanders of the next
higher units, no consideration being
given to the location of the lofts to
which the birds must necessarily fly.
In most cases the lofts which had been
in place long enough for the birds to
become familiar with their location
were as far to the rear as headquar
ters. and often still farther to the rear.
Messages arriving so far to the rear
were of small value for immediate use
to commanders of the lower front-line
units. In some cases mobile lofts were
located at or near a division headquar
ters and the birds sent from there to
the front lines before they had become
familiar with the loft's location. As a
consequence, released birds became
confused and failed to home promptly.
The indiscriminate assignment of
pigeons to lower front-line units is tac
tically unsound. Army experts say.
Pigeon communication should not be
considered or attempted as a normal
means of signal comm unleawon, fol
lowing normal channels, or between
combat units during warfare or move
ment. Pigeon communication should
only be employed for some special
service, such as a special reconnais
sance mission conducted by and for
the headquarters of any army, or by *
some high unit at the headquarters,
where lofts have time to be properly
established before the employment of
the birds from them. However, where
a special situation exists requiring
pigeon communication from a front
line unit to its next superior command
post, pigeons should be assigned to the
former unit. Under these conditions,
if a dispatch is sent by pigeon from
the front-line Knit, addressed to Its v
next commander, this dispatch would
be transmitted by electrical means,
(telephone, radio, etc.) from the loft to
the addresses.
a
The crowd starts arriving early /or "the greatest show on earth.’* —Star Staff Photo.
-* ___ c* - ■ ---
SAMUEL W. GUMPERTZ,
Vice president and general manager o] Ringling Bros. & Barnum
& Bailey Shows.
Photoplays in Washington Theaters This Week
WEEK OF
MAY 24.
Academy
«th and O Sts. 8.1.
Ambassador
16th and Columbia Rd
Apollo
624 H 8t, N.g._
Arcade
Hyattsvllle, Md.
Ashley
60S 7th St, 8.W.
Ashton
Clarendon. Va.
Avalon
6612 Connecticut Are.
Avenue Grand
645 Pa Are 8 E.
Cameo
Mount Rainier. Md.
Carolina
llth andN.C. Ave 8 8.
Central
426 8th St. H W.
Circle
2106 Pa. Ave. N.W.
Colony
Oa Ave. and Parratut
Dumbarton
1343 Wls. Ave. N.W.
Fairlawn
Anaeostla, D, C,
Hiprodrome
K near 8th
Home
13th and C Sta. H E.
Jesse
18th nr. R. I. Are. N.B.
Lee
Falls Church. Va.
Little
8th Between P and O
Rockville. Md,
Palm
Del Ray. Va.
Penn
030 Pa, Are. 8. E.
Princess
1119 H Bt, N.B.
Richmond
Alexandria, Va.
Savoy
8030 14th St. W.W.
Seco
Silver Bering. Md.
Stanton
Oth and C Sts, li t
State
Beiheada, Md.
State
Falla Church. Va.
Sylvan
104 R. I, Are, W.W.
Takoma
Takoma Park, D. C.
Tivoli
14th and Park Rd,
York •
Ga. Are. and
Sunday
Ruth Chatterton In
"Lady of Secrets.”
Boris Karloff in
"The Invisible Man."
Grace Moore and
Franchot Tone in
"The Kins Steps
i_out.”__
Shirley Temple
in
! "Captain January.”
I Mickey_Mouse._
Warner Baxter and
Ann Loring in
"Robin Hood El
;Dorado.” Cart.. News.
Joe Penner and
Jack Oakie
in
“Collegiate ”_
Dark.
Freddie Bartholomew
in
•'Little Lord
i Pauntleroy."_
Brent. Tobin. Farrell.
Ellis and McHugh in
; "Snowed Under.”
!_Popeye._
Shirley Temple and
Guy Kibbee in
“Captain January.”
Novelty and News._
Robert Donat in "The
Ghost Goes West.”
and Victor Jory in
“Too Tough Jo Kill/;
Double Feature
"Captain January,”
and
“Silly Billies."_
Carole Lombard and
Preston Foster in
“Love Before Break
|_fast."_News.
Jean Hersholt and
Dionne Quintuplets
in "Country Doctor.”
Mickey Mouse.
Eleanore Whitney and
Dickie Moore in
Timothy's Quest.”
_News. Comedy._
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire
in
^Follow the Fleet.”
Clark Gable and
Myrna loy in
'Wife vs. Secretary.”
Part., Novelty. News.
“Robin Hood of
El Dorado."
Mickey
_Mouse._
Shirley Temple in
"Captain January."
Audloscoplks. "Third
Dimension."
Dark.
"Lives of a Bengal
Lancer.”
with Gary Cooper and
Franchot Tone.
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee in
"Captain January."
Cartoon and News.
Dark.
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
“Mr. Deeds Goes to
Town.”
Jean Harlow. Spencer
Tracy in “Riffraff."
Sally Ellers in
"Don't Get Personal.”
Dark.
Charles Bickford In
"Pride of the
Marines.”
Coogan comedy._
Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers in
"Follow the Fleet.”
Comedy. Hews._
Lew Ayres in “The
Leathernecks Rave
Landed." Jas. Dunn.
"Don’t Get Personal."
Walter Huston in
"Rhodes, the
Empire Builder.”
Comedy and Hews
Dark.
Harry Richman and
Rochelle Hudson in
“Music Goes ’Round.”
Cartoon. Woveity,
George O’Brien
in
“O’Malley of the
_Mounted.”_
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
“Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town.”_
Robert Montgomery
and Myrna Loy in
■'Petticoat Fever.”
Major Bowes.
Monday
Ruth Chatterton In
; "Lady of Secrets.”
Boris Karloff In
"Thelnvisible Man."
Grace Moore and
Franchot Tone in
"The King Steps
__Out.”_
Shirley Temple
in
"Captain January.’*
_Mickey_Mouse._
Warner Baxter and
Ann Loring in
"Robin Hood E!
Dorado.” Cart . News
Joe Penner and
Jack Oakie
in
_"Collegiate.”_
Clark Gable.
Myrna Loy and
Jean Harlow in
"Wife vs. Secretary,’’
Freddie Bartholomew
In
"Little Lord
Fauntleroy.”
Brent. Tobin. Farrell.
Ellis and McHugh In
"Snowed Under.”
_Pope ye.._
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee In
"Captain January.”
Novelty and News.
Robert Donat in "The
Ghost Goes West.”
and Victor Jory in
"Too Tough to KMJ;
Double Feature
"Captain January."
and
"Silly Billies.”_
Carole Lombard and
Preston Foster in
"Love Before Break
_fast.” News.
Jean Hersholt and
Dionne Quintuplets
in "Country Doctor.”
Mickey Mouse._
Eleanore Whitney and
Dickie Moore in
"Timothy's Quest.’’
News. Comedy._
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire
in
"Follow the Fleet.”
Myrna Loy in
"Wife vs. Secretary.”
Cart.■ Novelty. News.
■'Robin Hood of
El Dorado.”
Mickey
Mouse._
Shirley Temple in
“Captain January.”
Audloscoplks. "Third
_Dimension."_
Sylvia Sidney
in
"Mary Burns, Fugi
_tive."_
"Lives of a Bengal
Lancer.”
with Gary Cooper and
_Franchot Tone.
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee in
“Captain January."
Cartoon and News.
Marlene Dietrich and
Gary Cooper in
“Desire.”
_Comedy._
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur In
“Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town." *
Jean Hallow. Spencer
Tracy in "Riffraff."
Sally Eilers in
“Don’t Get Personal.”
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee in
“Captain January.’L
Cartoon and News.
Charles Bickford In
"Pride of the
Marines.”
Coogan comedy._
Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers in
"Follow the Fleet.”
Comedy. News._
Lew Ayres in "The
Leathernecks Have
Landed.” Jas. Dunn.
“Don’t Get Personal.”
Walter Huston in
"Rhodes, the
Empire Builder.”
Comedy and News
A1 Jolson
in
"The Singing
_Kid.”
Harry Richman and
Rochelle Hudson in
“Music Goes ’Round.”
Cartoon, Novelty.
George O’Brien
in
"O’Malley of the
Mounted.”_
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
"Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town.”
Robert Montgomery
and Myrna Loy In
“Petticoat Fever.”
Maj^ Bowes. t
Tuesday
Joan Crawford and
Clark Gable
In
| “Chained."_
Grace Moore and
Franchot Tone in
"The King Steps
Out."_
Shirley Temple
in
“Captain January."
_ Mickey Mouse._
“Brides Are Like
That."
Comedy. Novelty and
_News.
Claudette Colbert
in
“Bride Comes
_Home.”_
Clark Gable.
Myrna Loy and
Jean Harlow in
“Wife vs. Secretary."
Freddie Bartholomew
in
! “Little Lord
I_Fauntleroy."
Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers
in
“Follow^ the Fleet."
Shirley Temple and
Guy Kibbee in
“Captain January."
Novelty and News.
Gladys Swarthout in
"Rose of the Rancho."
Conrad Nagel in “The
GirlFrom Mandalay."
Freddie Bartholomew
•Tittle11 Lord
_Fauntleroy.’]_
Warner Baxter and
Ann Loring in
“Robin Hood of El
_Dorado." Comedy.
Jean Hershoit and
Dionne Quintuplets
in “Country Doctor."
Mickey Mouse._
Ann Harding and
Herbert Marshall in
"The Lady Consents."
_Comedy.
Richard Arlen and
Cecilia Parker in
“Three Live Ghosts."
Comedy. Cartoon.
Oil lor Lamps oi
China.” Also
"Eight Bells.”
^Cartoon and Hews.
Carole Lombard and
Preston Poster In
"Love Before Break
fast ." Major Bowes.
Shirley Temple in
"Captain January.”
Audioscopiks. "Third
_Dimension."_
Sylvia Sidney
in
"Mary Burns, Fugl
_tive.”_
"Lives of a Bengal
Lancer.”
with Gary Cooper and
Franchot Tone.
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee In
“Captain January."
Cartoon and News.
Marlene Dietrich and
Gary Cooper in
“Desire.”
_Comedy._
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
“Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town."
George Raft. "It Had
to Happen." Conrad
Veldt. "Passing of the
Third Floor Back." I
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee in
“Captain January."
Cartoon and News.
Clark Gable. Myrna
Loy and Jean Harlow
in
“Wife vs. Secretary."
Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers In
"Follow the Fleet.”
Comedy. News._
Spencer Tracy and
Virginia Bruce
in
“The Murder Man."
Walter Huston in
"Rhodes, the
Empire Builder.”
Comedy and Hews
A1 Jolson
in
"The Singing
Kid.”
Ruby Keeler and
Dick Powell in
“Colleen.”
Cartoon. Novelty.
George Raft In
“It Had to Happen.”
Ann Sothern. "Don’t
Gamble With Love."
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
“Mr. Deeds Goes to
Town.”
Warner Baxter
in
“Robin Hood of
£1 Dorado.”
Wednesday
Joan Crawford and
Clark Gable
In
_“ Chained.”_
Grace Moore and
Franchot Tone in
'The Kina Steps
_Out.”_
“Robin Hood of
£1 Dorado. '
"Murder Dr Harri
gan.”
Cartoon. Novelty and
News._
Claudette Colbert
in
“Bride Comes
_Home."_
Clark Gable.
Myrna Loy and
Jean Harlow in
“Wife vs. Secretary."
Carole Lombard and
Preston Foster in
"Love Before
Breakfast."_
| Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers
in
! “Follow the Fleet.’*
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee In
“Captain January.'*
Novelty and News. _
Gladys Swarthout In
"Rose of the Rancho."
Conrad Nagel in "The
GirlFrom Mandalay/’
Freddie Bartholomew
in
“Little Lord
_Fauntleroy,"
George Brent and
Genevieve Tobin in
"Snowed Under."
_Comedies._
Carole Lombard and
Preston Foster in
“Love Before
_Breakftst/;_
Ann Harding and
Herbert Marshall in
"The Lady Consents."
_Comedy._
Shirley Temple in
“Captain January.”
Popular Science.
Matinee. 3 p.m.
"Oil for Lamps of
China.” Also
"Eight Bells.”
Cartoon and News.
Carole Lombard and
Preston Poster In
"Love Before Break
fast.^_Major Bowes.
Shirley Temple In
"Captain January.”
Audloscoplks. "Third
Dimension."
Jane Withers in
"Paddy O’Day."
"Lives of a Bengal
Lancer.”
with Gary Cooper and
Pranchot Tone.
Shirley Temple and
Guy Kibbee in
"Captain January."
Cartoon and News.
Harold Lloyd in
"The Milky Way.”
Comedy.
Cartoon._
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
"Mr, Deeds Goes to
Town.”
George Raft. "It Had
to Happen.” Conrad
Veidt. "Passing of the
Third Floor Back.”
Shirley Temple and
Guy Kibbee in
"Captain January.”
Cartoon and News.
Clark Gable. Myrna
Loy and Jean Harlow
in
^Wlfe jts. Secretary/^
Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers in
"Follow the Fleet.”
Comedy. Hews._
Maurice Chevalier,
Jeanette MacDonald
and Una Merkel in
“The Merry Widow.”
Mae West and
Victor McLaglen
in "Klondike Annie.”
Comedy and Cartoon.
Ann Harding
in
"The Witness
_Chair."
Ruby Keeler and
Dick Powell in ••
"Colleen.”
Cartoon, Hovelty.
George Raft in
"It Had to Happen."
Ann Sothern. "Don’t
Gamble With Love.”
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
"Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town.”
Warner Baxter
In
"Robin Hood of
BJDorado." I
Thursday
Eddie-Cantor in
‘ Strike Me Pink "
Regis Toomey in
"Bars of Hate."
Shirley Temple in
‘Captain January."
Robin Hood of
£1 Dorado."
Gary Cooper and
Marlene Dietrich in
•Desire." Comedy,
Novelty and News.
Ruth Chatterton In
Lady of Secrets."
Gail Patrick and
Reginald Denny in
"Preview Murder
_Mystery.*'
Carole Lombard and
Preston Foster in
"Love Before
Breakfast."
Chester Morris in
"Three Godfathers.”
"Midsummer Night's
Dream." with Cag
ney. Herbert. Powell.
Brown^Seats reserved.
Irene Dunne and
Robert Taylor In
"Magnificent Obses
sion." Hour of Com.
Chester Morris in
'Three Godfathers.”
8hirley Temple and
Guy Kibbee in
"Captain January."
_Cartoon. News.
Carole Lombard and
Preston Foster in
"Love Before
_Breakfast.”
A1 Jolson and
Sybil Jason in
‘The Singing Kid."
__News._
Shirley Temple in
"Captain January."
Popular Science.
Matinee. p.m.
noris n.arion in
‘•Walking Dead.”
Cartoon. Novelty and
_News.
Richard Arlen in
“Three Live Ghosts."
Robert Montgomery
and Myrna Loy in
“Petticoat Fever."
Comedy. Cartoon.
Jane Withers in
“Paddy O'Day.”
“Lives of a Bengal
Lancer.”
with Gary Cooper and
Franchot Tone._
“Midsummer Night'*
Dream,” with Cag
ney. Herbert. Powell,
Brown. 8eats reserved.
Harold Lloyd in
“The Milky Way.”
Comedy.
_Cartoon._
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
“Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town.”
Victor McLaglen in
“Professional Sol
dier.” Ray Walker in
“The Crime Patrol,”
Shirley Temple and
Guy Klbbee in
“Captain January.”
Cartoon and News.
Jack Haley and
Adrienne Marden
in
"F Man."__
Warner Baxter in
"The Prisoner of
Shark Island.”
MaJ. Bowes^amateura.
Sylvia Sidney. “Mary
Burns. Fugitive.”
Ralph Forbes in "I'll
Name the Murderer.”
Mae West and
Victor McLaglen
In "Klondike Annie.”
Comedy and Cartoon.
Gary Cooper
in
“Mr. Deeds Goes
to Town.”
Franchot Tone and
Madge Evans in
“Exclusive Btory.”
. Comedy. Cartoon.
Myrna Loy and
Robert Montgomery
in
“Petticoat Fever."
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
“Mr. Deeds Goes to
Town."
Freddie Bartholomew
in
“Little Lord
FaunUcxoj.” J
Friday
Eddie Cantor in
“Strike Me Pink
Reals Toomey in
"Bars of Hate."
Shirley Temple in
"Captain January."
Edmund Lowe and
Virginia Bruce in
"Garden Murder
_Case."_
Gary Cooper and
Marlene Dietrich in
"Desire.” Comedy,
Novelty and Nears.
Dick Foran
in
"Song of the
_Saddle.”_
Richard Arlen in
"Three Live Ghosts."
Todd and Kelly
I__comedy._
Edward Everett
Horton
in
"Her Master's Voice."
William Boyd in
"Call of the Prairie.”
"Midsummer Night's
Dream.” with Cag
ney. Herbert. Powell.
BrowmSeata reserved.
Irene Dunne and
Robert Taylor in
"Magnificent Obses
sion.” Hour of Com.
Gertrude Michael
and George Murphy
in
“Woman Trap.1*_
Shirley Temple and
Guy Kibbee in
"Captain January.
Cartoon. News.
Walter Huston in
"Rhodes.”
AWolson and
Sybil Jason in _
•The Singing Kid."
__News._
Shirley Temple in
“Captain January."
Popular Science.
Matinee. :t p m.
Joe E. Brown in
•'Alibi Ike.'' Also
"In Callente.”
_Cartoon and New»._
Eleanore Whitney
and Dickie Moore in
“Timothy s Quest.”
Chase comedy.
Robert Montgomery
and Myrna Loy in
"Petticoat Fever.”
Comedy. Cart. Serial.
Zane Grey's
“Drift Fence."
"Lives of a Bengal
Lancer."
with Gary Cooper and
Franchot Tone._
"Midsummer Night's
Dream." with Cag
ney. Herbert. Powell.
Brown. Seats reserved.
Laurel and Hardy in
"The Bohemian Girl.”
Rear Admiral Byrd in
"Little America ."
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
"Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town.”_
Victor McLaglen in
"Professional 80 1
dier.” Ray Walker in
^The^Crime Patrol."
Edward Arnold and
Binnle Barnes in
"Sutter’s Gold.”
Cartoon and News.
Dick Foran in
"Treachery Rides the
Range.”
Mickey Mouse com.
Warner Baxter in
"The Prisoner of
Shark Island."
Mai. Bowes^amateurs.
Sylvia Sidney. "Mary
Burns. Fugitive.”
Ralph Forbes in “I’ll
Name the Murderer.”
Warner Oland m
"Charlie Chan at
The Circus."
Cartoon.
Gary Cooper
In
•'Mr. Deeds Goes
_to Town.”_
Franchot Tone and
Madge Evans in
"Exclusive Story.’*
Comedy, Cart. Serial.
Myrna Loy and
Robert Montgomery
In
•'Petticoat Fever."
Gary Cooper and
Jean Arthur in
"Mr. Deeds Goes to
_Town."
Freddie Bartholomew
"Little11 Lord
ahuoUtiar.”
Saturday
Harry Richman. "The
Music Goes Round.
Buck Jones in
_“8ilvei^Spurs."
Jean Hersholt and
Dionne Quintuplets
in
“Country Doctor."
Double Feature.
"Every Saturday
Night.” and "Love
Before Breavfasl
Laurel and Hardy in
"Bohemian Girl.”
Cartoon and Frank
_Merriwell No.fl_
Jane Withers in
Paddy O’Day."
Hugh Herbert in
"To Beat the Band."
Lionel Barrymore in
"The Voice of Bugle
Ann.”
Cont. 3 to 11 p.m.
Warner Baxter in
"Robin Hood of
"El Dorado.”
Flash Gordon No. 1.
Double Feature.
“Two in Revolt.”
and
"Love On a Bet '*_
"Music Is Magic ”
"Everybody's Old
Man ’ Cartoon and
F. Merrswell No. 6.
Ken Maynard in
"Western Courage.”
Charlie Chspltn in
"Modern Times."
Louise Latimer and
John Arlldse
In
“Two In Revolt.”
Jane Withers and
Pinky Tomlin in
' Paddy O'Day."
Comedy. Cartoon.
Warner Baxter
in
“Robin Hood of
El Dorado.”_
William Boyd in
"Bar ill) Rides
Again.”
Comedy._
Ross Alexander and
Anita Louise in
“Brides Are Like
That." Comedy
Joe E. Brown in
-Alibi Ike." Also
"In Caliente."
_Cartoon and News.
Double feature. "Here
Comes Trouble."
-Pride of the Ms
rines." F. Gordon S.
Reginald Denny and
Gail Patrick In
"Preview Murder Mys
tery." Serial. Cart.
Bill Boyd In
"Federal Agent."
"Lives of a Bengal
Lancer."
with Gary Cooper and
_FranchotJTone._
James Dunn in
"Don’t Get Personal.”
Geo.O’Brien. "O’Mal
ley_of_the_Mounted."
Laurel and Hardy in
"The Bohemian Girl."
Rear Admiral Byrd In
_"Little America.”
Will Rogers in "Con
necticut Yankee."
Flash Gordon No. 5.
Edgar Kennedy com.
Wallace Beery. “West
Point of the Air.”
GeneAutrey. "Coming
■ Round the Mountain”
Edward Arnold and
Binnie Barnes in
“Sutter's Gold ”
_CartoonandNews._
Gary Cooper and
Marlene Dietrich
in
"Desire.”__
Richard Dtx in
“Yellow Dust.”
Charles Starrett. "The
MyiterlousAvenger.J
John Howard In "Mil
lionsln the Air.” Gene
Autrey in "The Sase
brush Troubadour.”
Warner bland in
' Charlie Chan at
the Circus."
_Cartoon.
Gary Cooper
In
"Mr. Deeds Ooes
to Town.”
Eleanore Whitney and
Dickie Moore In _
"Timothy’s Quest.”
Addedattraction. 8c r.
Minor Whitney and
Dickie Moore In
"Timothy’s Quest.”
_Selected shorts._
Will Rogers in
"Connecticut
Yankee.”
Mash Gordon No. 1.
Laurel and Hardy in
“Bohemian Girl.”
t

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