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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 31, 1936, Image 24

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B—6 _v _ WASHINGTON, D. C., SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 31, 1936.__
. ■■■ - - ———■———^^^^——————■—^^————^I—^^^^""""^————■—^——— L A
McMahon Star Marathon Victor: U. S. Tennis Win Up to Doubles
m _ - -- - - *
SETS MARK IN WIN i
Of A. A. U. CROWN
Gets Olympic Berth by His
2:38:14Vs Race—Kelley
Is Close Second.
(Continued From First Page.)
wished him well in the forthcoming
Olympic championships at Berlin.
So fast was the race—the fifth na
tional marathon championship spon
sored by The Star—that the first two
finishers shattered the previous record
for the arduous 26-mile 385-yard
route, and the third man barely
missed it,
McMahon ran the distance in 2
hours 38 minutes 14 U seconds. The
previous record, set by Dave Komonen
of Canada in 1934, was 2 hours 43
minutes 26% seconds.
McMahon's time is nearly seven
minutes behind the Olympic record
for the distance, but the record set
In 1932 at Lo6 Angeles by Juan Zabala
was made over an easier course than
that traversed by the men w ho finished
’ yesterday.
r Kelley finished 300 yards back of
'McMahon, with whom he had run
'•shoulder to shoulder for 7 gruel
.Ing miles through city traffic, in the
,time of 2 hours 40 minutes 7,10
seconds.
Mel Porter of New York, who fin
ished third in 2 hours 43 minutes 27
seconds, was but three-fifths of a
second behind the old record for the
A. A. U. marathon.
Pace Too Hot for Dengis.
pAR back in eighth place, worn
down by the grueling pace of the
fast race, was Pat Dengis, the Balti
more airplane mechanic, who won the
1935 marathon. Dengis set the pace
for the first 16 miles of the race,
running well ahead of his field in
record time for the first 5, 10 and 15
miles, and then, wearied by his pace
setting effort, dropped back into
fourth place.
He barely lasted to stagger across
the finish line and at one time—the
■wearisome jaunt up Capitol Hill—Pat
glowed down to a walk.
In fourth place was a colored en
trant—Augustus Johnson of^the In
terstate Sport Club of Portchester,
N. Y.
Strange stuff for a man about to
run the marathon' distance was the
lunch McMahon ate a few hours be
fore the race started at Mount Ver
non at 2 o'clock. He ate a steak
smothered in onions and an hour
after the race he tossed off two
malted milk shakes. "Gee, I felt
hungry,*’ he said. "But boy, how
happy I am. Hope I can run well
at Berlin.”
“How do your feet feel?” some one
asked him. The marathon is a test
not only of nerve and muscle and
intestinal fortitude, but also of feet.
Many a marathoner has dropped out
with his feet a mass of aching blis
ters. "They feel fine.” grinned the
personable man from Worcester.
“They feel much better than they felt
at Boston. I think the course is
better and conditions are better than
they were there.”
McMahon finished second in the
Boston marathon on April 19 to Tar
ean Brown.
Runs Heady Race.
THE winner has been running dis
1 tance races only four years. He
runs about one a year, but this year
he decided to double. He was reg
istered from the Ancient Order of
Hibernians of Worcester, where he
grained his muscles running up and
down the hills that lie about that
Interior Massachusetts city.
For a comparatively immature
Inarathon runner competing against
•veterans like Porter, Les Pawson,
fWhitey Michelson and John D. Sem
ple, McMahon ran a heady race. Al
ways up in the forefront of the pa
rade of men who lay ’em one in
front of the other, McMahon held j
back his winning spurt until the race
avas more than half over. At the
6-mile mark, down on the Arlington
Boulevard, while Dengis was setting I
the red-hot pace that burned him out,
McMahon was lying back with a half
dozen others, 150 yards behind Den
Bis and Anthony J. Paskell of Lynn,
Mass., who were running neck and
peck in first place.
At the tenth milestone, just north
of Alexandria on the Mount Vernon
Boulevard, he had worked his way up
Into seventh place, with Dengis and
Paskell still leading the parade. At
the twelfth mile Dengis was running
200 yards in front of Paskell, with
McMahon running fifth, back of
Kelley.
MWMUVU, ncucj IXgm uueu
■RUT as the leader wore himself out
shortly after he passed over the
Arlington Memorial Bridge and headed
down Into the leafy coolness of East
Potomac Park both Kelley and Mc
Mahon passed him. Down around
Hains Point they passed through lines
of cheering holiday-makers, running
shoulder to shoulder, grabbing an
orange from an attendant here and
• sponge filled with water there.
Marathon runners do not drink wa
ter. It’s bad for the tummy during a
race. They sip a sponge or wet their
mouths with orange juice. Water In
any quantity makes them ill. Down
there somewhere in Potomac Park
Dengis had a recurrence of the kidney
trouble which may have cost him the
Boston marathon. He admitted after
the race that his back hurt “terribly”
shortly after he left the Memorial
Bridge.
Up west from Hains Point toward
"the railroad bridge and north on
Fourteenth street Kelley and McMahon
ran literally shoulder to shoulder.
They were setting a blistering pace
and both knew it. But neither man
weakened. Down into Constitution
avenue, through lines of automobiles
thrust aside by the police, they picked
'em up and laid ’em down, one behind
the other, still shoulder to shoulder.
Up the grueling two blocks of Capitol
Hill they moved—slower now, for they
were weakening—out to Seventh street
(See MARATHON, Pag* •■)
William McMahon, winner, receiving Evening Star Marathon trophy from Phil Merryman, N. B. C. engineer (right), and Jim McGrath, star sports announcer, on board a
Dr. Hans Luther, German Ambassador. tandem bicycle, from which they broadcast the story of the race.
*---—-—-—..
Johnny Kelley, unattached, of Arlington, Mass., who came in second, shaking hands with
the winner. —Star Staff Photos,
-:
Dr. B. G. Chitwood of the
Washington Track and Field
Club, first District man to
cross the line.
ATHLETIC HERO DIES.
PALO ALTO, Calif., May 30 (&).—
Murray Cuddeback, 34, Stanford ath
letic hero and assistant foot ball
coach, died today after a long illness
resulting from injuries received on a
bunting trip.
LAD RUNS FAST MILE.
COLUMBUS, Ohio, May 30 04*).—
Bob Curtis, tall blond from Shaw
High school in Cleveland, ran the
mile in 4:24.8 today, one-tenth of
a second better than the national
scholastic record, set in 1930 by Glenn
Cunningham.
Ill ■ I
I
League Statistics
SIND AT. MAY 31. 1936.
American
RESULTS YESTERDAY.
New York. 7—6: Washington. 1—1.
8t Louis S—5: Detroit. 3—0.
Cleveland. 4—11: Chicago. 3—3.
Philadelphia. 6—2; Boston. 4—6.
~ *1 Jf! G $?!« 9!3iSj< E ? O
« !; 3 * S ? ft ~ § I 3 !fi
; 5 p
1 ! i : ° i g 1 1 ! 1 i
NY I—I 41 61 21 61 21 61 41291131.6901
Bos I 31—I II 41 61 61 41 3126I17I.60SI 3*6
Cle! 01 31— I 41 31 41 31 71331171.6761 6
Pet I 21 II 61—I 41 61 31 21231301.6361 6Vb
Wnl 21 61 21 21—1 01 61 41311221.4881 8*6
Chil 21 01 11 31 31—1 31 71191201.4871 8*6
Phil 31 31 II II 11 II—I 31131261.333!14Mi
9tLI 11 II 21 41 01 II 21—1111301.268117*6
L. II31171171201221201261301—I—I I
GAMES TODAY. GAMES TOMORROW.
Wash at Phils.. 2. No tames scheduled.
Boston at New York.
St. Louis at Detroit.
Chicago at Cleve.
National
RESULTS YESTERDAY.
Philadelphia. 5—9: Boston. 4—8.
Brooklyn 9—3: New York. 6—0
Pittsburgh. 7—11: Chicago. 5—7.
Cincinnati. 10—4: St. Louis. 1—7.
e « 2 » S s = g § I g |g
* I S Z s § § I = : I SI
s=.ai*8: § a i : I l
! " a- ! e i & | i • g
: ■ I i I I g ! ! i : 1
StLI—I 3 61 61 2 21 41 31261141.6501
NT II—I 31 21 31 41 71 61351161.6101 1*4
Pit 31 II—I 31 51 21 41 31811191.6351 5
Chll 31 II 21—I 51 31 21 81191701.4871 «»4
Clnl 31 21 41 51—1 ll SI 21191221.4631 7V»
Boal 31 21 21 11 at—I 21'61181331.4621 3
Phil 01 31 11 81 SI 71—1 SI18I35I.419I
Bkll 11 41 11 11 21 41 4 —1171251,405110
L. 11411 «UBi30lagj83l36l9B I—I—I I
GAMES TODAY. GAMES TOMORROW.
Pitts, at Chicago. No fames scheduled.
Cin. at St. Louis.
New York at Burn.
Phils, at Boston.
DRIVES IN 12 RUNS.
Solomon L vine set s record in the
Northeast Base Ball League yester
day when his three home runs and a
double drove in 12 runs during the
game, which his Premier Senators
took from the Orioles, 30-3. It was
the thirteenth straight victory for the
winners.
Gives Washington a Chance
for Even Break in Its
May Campaign.
EW YORK, May 30.—The Na
tional* first extensive tour
ing of the season will end
tomorrow when the Wash
ington ball club invades Philadelphia
for a single game with the Athletics
before heading homeward for a long
home stand.
With Jack Russell cm the slab, the
Griffs will seek their seventh victory
in eight games against the A s. On
Monday they’ll rest from their re
cent labors before entertaining the
Western entries at Griffith Stadium.
The second month of the season
has found the Harrismen doing noth
ing but run on a treadmill, but they
still have a chance to finish their
May campaigning with a record of
13 wins against as many defeats.
The Nationals dropped five of their
first seven games this month, but
have won 10 of the last 18 to take
away some of the sting, and despite
today’s double defeat the prospects
for the future are not exactly forbid
ding. 8ince Whltehffi got back to
pitching this month the veteran has
won three and lost one. Jimmy de
Shong has proved a consistent win
ner and with a little help from Buck
Newsom during the forthcoming
home stand the club m*y go some
where.
First of the Western teams to In
vade Washington next week will be
the Browns, who visit for three
games. The Tigers will drop in for
a two-game set, and will be followed
by tbe Indians and Whits Sox, who
will play three tilts each.
BOWMAN FOUND DEAD.
WEST LONG BRANCH, N. J„ May
30 (if).—Chester A. Bowman, 34,
Olympic sprint champion, 1334, and
fanner Syracuse foot ball star, was
found dead In his automobile late
today.
Estalella9 Weak Pinch-Hitter9
Optioned to Albany by Nats;
Stadium Stops Stone at Bat
By t Stiff Correspondent ot The Star.
NEW YORK, May 30—The me
teoric base ball rise ol young
Bobby Estalella tailed off to
day when President Clark
Griffith announced his transfer to Al
bany of the International League.
Estalella, who rated on a par with
Red Kress as 1935 s best hunk of
sports page ‘'copy,” left the Nationals
last night for Baltimore, where the
Albany club will play a double-header
tomorrow. The colorful little Cuban,
who jumped from an Island sugar
plantation to the big leagues, goes on
option, and is subject to recall within
24 hours.
Griffith let the diminutive slugger
go on one condition, and that was
that Owner Joe Cambria of Albany
promise to play him regularly in the
outfield. Griffith and Harris have
given up all hope of Estalella acquir
ing sufficient polish to play the in
field, and they now hope that Bobby,
wi(', proper schooling in the minors,
will be able to return at the end of
the season as a gardener.
'T'HE original front-office intention
thia Spring was to carry Estalella
on the club as a pinch-hitter if he
could not win the third base job.
Bobby s chances of playing third base
were doomed almost from the time
,-1
Official Scores
FIRST GAME.
WASHINGTON. AB. R. H. O. A. E
Powell. cl_......v 5 0 13 1 0
Lewis. :tb... 400051
Myer. 2b_ 1 0 0 7 2 0
Stone If_ 4 0 0 3 0 0
Trsvis. rf_ 4 0 1 0 0 0
Kuhel. lb_ 2 0 1 8 0 0
Kress, ss- ♦ « 1 1 2 0
Bolton, c_ 4 1 2 2 2 0
Whitehill. o_,. 1 0 o 0 1 0
•Miles_ 1 0 0 0 0 0
Weaver, p_ 000010
tHill _- 1 0 0 0 0 0
Totals_31 ~ 6 24 14 1
•Batted for whitehlll In seventh Inning.
tBatted for Weaver in ninth inning.
NEW YORK. AB. R. H. O. A. E
Crosettl. SS-— 5 2 2 1 0 0
Rolfe 3b_ 4 0 3 1 2 0
Di Miggio. If_ 4 0 1 5 0 0
Oehrlg lb_ 3 11«oo
Chapman, ef- 4 0 2 2 0 1
Hoag. rf.. 4 0 o 0 p 0
Lesser!. 2b_ 3 2 2 0 1 0
Olenn. c_ 4 1 3 9 0 0
Pearson, p._._- 3 10 0 10
Tot ale_34 ~7 14 27 ~4 ~I
Score by Innings:
Washington _ono 010 000—1
New York_ 000 130 21x—7
Runs batted in—Gehrig. Powell. Crosettl
12). Ro.'fe (2). Di Magglo. Pearson. Two
base hits—Bolton. Rolfe. Olenn. Home
run—Gehrig. Stolen base—Crosettl. Sac
rifices—Whitehill. Pearson. Double plays—
Kress. Myer to Kuhel: Gehrig (unassisted).
Left on bases—New York. 6; Washington.
9. Bases on balls—0(1 Pearson. 6: oft
Whiteh‘U. 1; off Weaver 1. Struck out—
By Pearson. 8: by Whitehlll. 1: by Weaver.
1. Hits—Off Whitehill. 9 in 6 Innings: off
Weaver 5 In 2 Innings. Losing pitcher—
Whitehlll. Umpires—Messrs. Morlarty.
Basil and Kolls. Time—2:14.
SECOND GAME.
WASHINGTON. AB. R. H. O. A. E.
Powell, cf_ 4 0 I) 1 O ()
Lewis. 3b_ 4 0 0 1 1 0
Myer. 2b_ 4 0 1 2 2 0
Stone. lf__ 3 0 0 3 0 0
Til Vis, rf_ 3 0 0 0 1 0
Kuhel. lb_ 2 119 2 0
Kress, as_ 3 0 0 1 4 0
Bolton c___ 3 0 0 8 0 0
Newsom, p__ 10 0 111
•Miles _ 1 0 0 o o n
Marberry. p_- o o o o 1 0
tHill _-_ 100000
Appleton, p- 0 0 0 0 0 0
Totals_29 ~I ~2 24 13 "T
•Batted for Newsom in sixth inning.
tBatted for Marberry in eighth Inning.
NEW YORK. AB. R. H. 0. A. E.
Crosettl. aa_ 4 112 3 0
Rolfe. 3b_—_ 4 0 0 1 0 0
DI Magglo. If_ 4 3 3 8 0 0
Gtehri" lb_-_ 3 12*00
Selkirk rf_ 4 12 10 0
Chapman, ef___ 4 1 3 4 0 0
Lazzerl. 2b_ 3 0 1 0 2 0
Glann. e-- 4 0 1 5 0 0
Ruffing, p_..... 4 0 0 0 4 0
Totals_34 12 27 ~9 ~0
Score by Innings:
Washington - 000 010 poo—1
New York_ 000 410 lOx—6
Runs batted In—Oehrlg (2). Selkirk <2>.
Lazier!. Kuhel. Crosettl. Two-base hits—
Di Martlo (3). Chapman. Three-basa
hit—Selkirk. Home runs—Selkirk. Kuhel.
CrwittL Double plays—Kress. Myer to
Kuhel: Newsom. Kuhel to Bolton. Lett on
bases—New York. 6; Washington, 2. Bases
ajatSyssa Eansffiii
Manager Bucky Harris got a good
look at Buddy Lewi* In Florida, and
as a pinch-hitter Estalella was tried
and found wanting. Apparently he
is not the kind of a ball player who
can climb out of a dugout and fre
quently bang out base hits in a pinch
hitting role.
Esty started well with the Nationals.
He walked the first time he pinch
batted and tripled on his next trip,
but outside of gathering another triple
and three more walks in 13 trips to the
plate he was a total loss. In his last
six trips to the dish Bobby struck
out four times. His batting record
of two hits in nine trips gave Bobby
an average of only .222.
Albany is a “farm” team of the
Nationals and Cambria is the discov
erer of the bow-legged importation.
Cambria picked him up in 1934 and
the following year sent Bobby to his
Harrisburg team of the New York
Pennsvlvania League, where Esty bat
ted .314 and led the league in home
runs. He was brought to Washington
near the close of last season and
proved a sensation. Capital fans
adopted him in such a fashion that
when Lewis was placed on third base
for a trial they openly demanded that
Esty play. But that, of course, was
before Buddy was given a fair chance.
There have been no cries for Esta
lella this year.
JOHNNY STONE wasn't much at
the tee, but the rangy outfielder
did his share in the field today. His
catch of Ben Chapman's drive against
the left-field boxes in the second in
ning of the twin-bill opener was a
beaut.
The Yankee Stadium seems to be
Johnny’s jinx hitting grounds. He
whiffed the first two times at bat in
the opener and on his first try in the
second game and spent the rest of the
| day rolling or popping out. It was here
Griffs’ Records
BATTING.
G Ab. R. H. 2b. 3b. Hr Rbi. Pet.
Ltnke... ft l.'i 2 8 2 0 1 4 .482
Lewis_ 38 1ST 25 81 6 0 2 18 .365
: Kress_ 23 75 13 23 6 0 2 lo 2107
Millies 32 69 6 21 6 10 8 .304
Bolton 28 88 16 26 5 1 1 13 .295
Powell 43 l'O 31 56 9 4 1 28 .294
Reynolds 31 113 11 33 7 O 1 17 .292
Travis . 40 159 23 45 12 2 1 28 .283
Stone_28 02 20 26 6 4 3 18 .283
Kuhel_ 43 152 26 43 7 3 5 32 .283
Hill _ 29 103 17 29 8 2 O 11 .282
'Miles 14 41 6 11 1 1 O 3 .268
Appleton 10 23 2 6 O O O 3 .261
Myer 35 121 22 31 4 1 o 11 .256
Esiellalla 13 9 2 2 0 2 O 0 .222
De Shoni 8184 3 0 0 0 1 .167
Newsom 13 33 1 4 0 0 0 1 .121
Blueae 6 18 o 2 0 0 O 0 .111
Whttehill 5 11 2 1 O o 0 O .091
Weaver 8 1009000 .000
Marberry 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 o .000
Russell _ 15 12 200000 .000
PITCHING.
G. H BB. SO IP. GS. CG W. L
De Shon* 8 44 24 21 55% 7 5 5 2
Newsom 13 97 43 51 92 13 8 5 5
| Whitehiil 5 44 10 7 35% 5 13 2
Russell 15 47 21 6 40% 4 13 2
Appleton 10 64 28 24 62 7 4 3 3
| Weaver 8 17 11 1 15% 10 11
Marberry 3 2 2 2 6 O o 0 1
Linke _ 9 60 7 9 39% 5 114
•Coppola 6 15 12 2 14 O O 0 0
•Bokma 5 15 5 5 8% 1 o O 2
•Chase 1 2 4 1 2% 0 0 0 0
•Released
that he fanned six straight times
last year.
s -—
TTS too bad Bucky Harris couldn't |
have grabbed Monte Pearson from
i the Indians at the Winter trade mart,
as he'd hoped. The Grifls could use
, a hurler who wins eight of nine
games. As it is. Pearson not only is
turning out to be a winner for the
Yanks, but he's licked the Nationals
twice now, giving up only two runs
in 18 innings.
VICTORY BY BUDGE
Struggle for Don to Beat
Crawford—Allison Is No
Match for Quist.
BY BOB CAVAGNARO. *
Associated Press Sports Writer.
Philadelphia, May 30 —
America's one and only hope
In Davis Cup tennis play.
Torch-top Donald Budge of
Oakland, Calif., came through today
with a stirring five-set triumph over
the veteran Jack Crawford to give
the United States an even break in
the American rone final series against
Australia.
Rallying courageously after dissi
pating a two-set advantage, the 21
year-old Pacific Coast star aroused
himself to the cheers of a 6,500 ca
pacity gallery at the Germantown
Cricket Club and out-stayed the
crafty and masterful Crawford, win
ning 6—2, 6—3. 4—6, 1—6, 13—11. *
Budge's conquest of the man ex
perts figured he would beat in a
breeze because of his youth and su
perior stamina, nullified the antici
pated triumph of Adrian Quist, Au
stralian title holder, over Wilmer
Allison of Austin. Tex., the American
champion. Quist took the measure
of Allison at 6—3, 5—7, 6—4, 6—1,
in a match which found Allison 'way
below his 1935 championship form.
Doubles Held Toss-Up.
The doubles contest tomorrow,
scheduled to start at 2:30 pm. |
(Eastern standard time), now ap
pears to be a toss-up in view of the
gruelling five-set match played by
Budge and Crawford. In the tandem
clash Budge is slated to play with
his fellow-Califomian, Gene Mako,
against Crawford and Quist. In view
of the fact the Australians trimmed
Budge and Mako on the way to the
1935 all-England championship they
had been regarded as favorites.
However, experts tonight called it an j
even-money go.
Shades of 1927, when France took
the elusive and coveted cup from the
United States on this club's same cen
ter court, danced across the turf as
Budge's game fell completely apart in
the third and fourth sets. In the
first two chapters Crawford was
baffled by the towering Californian's
speed, and although it wa- fisky
business. Crawford obviously passed
up the sets trying to figure a way
to handle it.
Crawford Soon Learns. %
J^URING that time it seemed Budge
was going to give Uncle Sam
the tying point in straight sets and
that it would be impossible for Craw
ford to go extra innings because of
the unabated swiftness of Budge's
pace. Budge had Crawford running
his legs off.
However, Crawford apparently was
not wasting his time, because he
showed early in the third set he had
found the way to tame his younger .
rival’s thunderous drives. It was just 1
as simple as it sounds. Crawford
stayed at his base line, only occasion
ally going to the net. and with fluent,
machine-like stroking sent back safely
practically everything Budge delivered.
The taming of Budge’s power rattled
the Californian and Crawford’s flaw
less steadyness forced Budge Into re
peated errors.
Crawford broke Budge’s service In
the third game of the final set, taking
a 2-1 lead, and It looked like superior
(See BUDGE, Page 9.)_ „
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