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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 31, 1936, Image 25

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Nats Crack, Bow to Yankees Twice: Meyer Sets Auto Mark
_ -V -—-'-❖ —. >■ ❖-—
- V.
“My New
Dodge Has
Plenty On
The Ball”
Say CARL HUBBELL,
Famous New York Giants Pitcher
S___r
FOLLOWS^] LOSS
Harris Hands Hit Poorly,
Lack Strength on Hill in
Holiday Tilts.
BY FRANCIS E. STAN,
Staff Correspondent of The Star.
NEW YORK. May 30—Those
twin evils of collapsible pitch
ing and futile bat swinging
rose up and smote the Na
tionals squarely between the eyes to-;
day as New York's league-leading
Yankees, before a record 1936 crowd,
decorated the Capital's diamond
forces with a pair of Memorial day
defeats.
Behind the great pitching of Monte
Pearson the Yanks won the opener
from Earl Whitehill, 7-1, and be
hind the even greater pitching of
Red Ruffing captured the nightcap
from Buck Newsom, 6-1.
Their smashing victories elevated
the New Yorks to three and one-half
games over the second-place Boston
Red Sox, who split their twin bill
With the Athletics.
The Nationals, muffing a chance to
rise, won in only a single respect to
day, and that was a box-office victory.
The throng that jammed the Yankee
Stadium to capacity totaled 71,754
cash customers, setting a new attend
ance high for this season and taking
place among the all-time big base
ball crowds.
Can’t Win in New York.
pEARSON, registering his second
-victory over the Nationals, gave
up only six hits in the opener, while
Ruffing limited them to two safeties
in the nightcap. One was a single
to left by Capt Buddy Myer and the
other a whistling home run by Joe
Kuhel.
Pearson's victory was his eighth in
nine starts this year, while Ruffing’s
triumph preserved the Washington
ball club’s 1936 record of not having
won a single game in Yankee Stadium.
For the first four innings the opener
was a beautiful pitching duel between
Earl Whitehill and Pearson. Both
literally mowed down the batsmen,
but once the Yankees found the range
the Nationals dropped far out of
contention. Pearson, giving up only
three hits in the first eight innings
and three more in the ninth, easily
was the master of the Griffs. He
walked four batters, but he fanned
eight, twice striking out the side. The
New Yorkers socked Whitehill and
Monte Weaver, his unsuccessful suc
• eessor, for 14 blows.
Gehrig Breaks Ice.
T OU GEHRIG, after Whitehill had
*■"* faced only 11 batters in the first
three and two-thirds innings, broke
the ice in the fourth frame by bang
ing out a home run after Rolfe and
Di Maggio meekly had rolled out.
Lou's seventh homer sailed into the
center field bleachers.
The Nationals didn’t stay behind
long. In the fifth Clif Bolton dou
bled to start things, and moved to
third on Whitehill’s sacrifice. When
Jake Powell inserted his first hit in
his last nine times at bat, Bolton
scored. The attack died here, but it
looked, indeed, as though the Har
rismen were going to have much to
•ay.
This suspicion promptly was blown
to bits by the Yankees. In their half
of the fifth they fell upon Mr. White
hill with great gusto to boost the score
to 4-1. The ingredients used in the
rally were successive singles by Laz
reri and Glenn, a sacrifice by Pear
son, a single by Crosetti and a dou
ble by Rolfe.
Weaver Mark for Yanks.
\VTHEN the Washington seventh
rolled around Whitehill left the
premises in favor of Pinch-Hitter
Dee Miles, and if the Yanks had
found Earl easy toward the close of
his term they found Weaver easier.
Monte gave up four hits in the sev
enth inning and the Yanks scored
two runs to make it 6 to 1. In the
eighth they added their seventh and
final run.
The Nationals, in their half of the
ninth, managed to stir up what bore
a resemblance to a rally, but outside
of accumulating as many hits as they
got off Pearson in the first eight
rounds, it meant nothing. With one
down, Kuhel, Red Kress and Bolton
singled in succession to fill the bases,
but Pinch-Hitter Jesse Hill lifted a
short fly to Chapman and PoweU
hoisted to Di Maggio to end it all.
The nightcap was strikingly sim
ilar to the first game, in that Wash
ington's bats weren't hitting anything
and the Yankees’ sticks, after early
meekness, were socking everything
that came over the plate. For three
innings the second tilt was a pretty
struggle between Newsom and Ruf
fing. Then Newsom, like Whitehill,
folded up, and Ruffing, like Pearson,
kept right on curving ’em. The Yanks
slapped Buck and Fred Marberry for
12 safeties.
Di Maggio Starts Trouble.
T~\ESPITE a double by Di Maggio in
the first inning and a triple by
Selkirk In the second, it was not
until the fourth that New York got
around to scoring. But when they
did the Yanks struck sharply.
Di Maggio started Newsom’s down
fall by opening the fourth with a dou
ble. He scored as Gehrig singled,
and when Selkirk parked a drive into
the bleachers, the score was 3-0, and
still the Yanks weren’t finished. Chap
man, next up, doubled, and Lazzerl
provided the fifth straight hit to count
Ben.
In the fifth Kuhel raised a faint
vestige of hope in the Capital contin
gent when, with one down, he rapped
a pitch by Ruffing into the right-field
pews. It developed, however, that it
merely was a lapse on Ruffing’s part
and not a sign of his weakening, for
Red resumed his habit of mowing
down the Griffs thereafter.
After the Yanks got that run by
Kuhel back in their fifth, cm a double
by Di Maggio and a single by Geh
rig, the forlorn figure of Mr. Newsom
departed for the showers and Mar
berry came in to pitch. Fred, after
being nicked for a homer by Crosetti
in the seventh, was removed for
Finch-Hitter Jesse Hill in the Wash
ington eighth, and Pete Appleton
worked the final frame.
GET HOWARD LETTERS.
Capt. Robert W. Wilson, Charles
Brown, Robert Briggs, Fred Durrah,
James Monroe, Robert Anderson and
Granville Moore were awarded var
sity letters yesterday at Howard Uni
versity for service on the Bison rifle
tUBI
ROOKS WIN AS A’S
AND BOSOX DIVIDE
Fink Tosses Victory for Macks.
While. Henry Turns Trick
for Boston Club.
Ej the Associated Press.
PHILADELPHIA, May 30.—The
1 Athletics and Boston Red Sox
divided a double-header before Shibe
Park's record crowd of the season,
28,450 paid, today.
The Mackmen won the first game,
6 to 4. and the Red Sox the second,
6 to 2.
Wally Moses’ single, scoring Finney
and Warstler in the seventh inning,
provided the margin of victory by
which Herman Fink, rookie right
hander, defeated Wes Ferrell in the
opening game.
Jim Henry, Red Sox recruit,
stopped the Macks with five hits in
the nightcap.
Boston. AB. H. O. A. Phila. AB. H. O. A
Melilio.2b 3 0 3 4 Finney.lb 4 111 0
Almada.lt 3 1 3 o W'stler.Sb 3 0 8 4
Cooke.rl_ 4 3 2 <> Moses.cf_ 4 12 0
Foxx.lb.. 4 18 0 Puc'elli.rt 3 2 2 0
McNair.ss 3 2 2 1 Hig'lns.3b 3 11 3
Werber.lib 4 13 2 Johns'n.ll 3 110
Cramer.ct 4 0 4 1 Ne s'me.ss 4 2 17
Bere.c_3 12 1 Hayes.c_3 O 3 0
•Miller__ 1 0 0 0 Fink p_ 4 0 0 0
Ferrell.p.. 3 0 0 0
Totals_32 8 24 0 Totals_30 8 27 14
•Batted tor Berg In ninth inning.
Boston _ooo 100 021—4
Philadelphia_013 ooo 20x—8
Runs—Almada (2). McNair. Berg. Fin
ney. Warstler. Moses. Puecinelli <21. Hig
gins. Runs batted in—Fkixx. Cooke <21.
Werber. Puecinelli. Newsome <2>. Higgins.
Moses ;2). Two-base hits—Newsome. Al
mada. Cooke Three-base hit—McNair.
Home run—Puecinelli. Sacrifice—Pucci
nelli. Double plays—Higgins to Finney:
Higgins Warstier to Finney (21. lelt on
base—Boston. 4: Philadelphia, ti. Bases on
balls—Off Ferrell, ft: off Fink. 3. Struck
out—By Ferrell. 2. Umpires—Messrs.
Owens. Johnston and Summers. Time—
1:49.
♦Mailho. 1 o c* <i
Moss.c_1 1 0 (1
Ross.p_3 1 0 (I
tPetcrs_1 0 0 fl
Total*.7t4~f* 27 Tl Totals-30 5 27 12
• -Batted for Newsome In ninth Inning.
♦Batted for Hayes In seventh inning.
1 Bat ted for Rose In ninth inning.
Boston____ 100 301 100—fl
Philadelphia_loo nnl ooo—2
Runs—Almada. Foxx. McNair. Werber
♦ 2). Henry Finney. Johnson. Error—Ross.
Runs batted In—Cooke. Werber. Kroner
(2). Almada. PuccinelU. Johnson. Two
base hits—PuccinelU. Cooke. Ross. Three
base hit—Almada. Home run—Johnson.
Stolen base—Werber. Sacrifices—Warstler.
Melillo wDouble plays—McNair. Melillo to
Foxx: Newsome. Warstler to Finney: John
son to Higgins. Left on bases—Boston. «:
Philadelphia. 4. Bases on balls—Oft Henry.
2: off Ross. 4 Struck out—By Henry. 5;
by Rom. 1. Wild pitch—Ross. Umpires—
Messrs. Johnston. Bummers and Owens.
Time—1:46.
Homer Standings
ty the Associated Presa.
Yesterday'* homers—Trosky, In
dians, 2; Collins, Cardinals, 2; Leslie,
Giants, 1; Leiber, Giants, 2; E. Moore,
Bees, 1; Berger, Bees, 1; Goodman,
Reds, 1; Herman, Reds, 1; Todd,
Pirates, l; Galan, Cubs, 1; Med wick,
Cardinals. 1; S. Martin, Cardinals, 1;
Gehrig, Yankees, 1; Selkirk, Yankees,
1; Crosetti, Yankees, 1; Kuhel, Sen
ators, 1; PuccinelU, Athletics, 1; John
son, Athletics, 1; Bottomley, Browns,
1; Simmons, Tigers, 1; Gehringer,
Tigers, 1; Radcliffe, White Sox, 1;
Averill, Indians, 1.
The leaders—Foxx, Red Sox, 13;
Tro6ky, Indians, 12; J. Moore, Phillies,
9; Dickey, Yankees, 9; Lazzeri,
Yankees, 8; Gehrig, Yankees, 7; Gos
lin. Tigers, 7; Ott, Giants, 7.
League totals—American, 198; Na
tional, 189; total, 387.
BROWNS ENJOY DAY
AT TIGERS’ EXPENSE
Register 5-to-0 Triumph After
Walking Away With First
Encounter, 5 to 3.
By the Assoc la tea Press.
r\ETROIT, May 30—St. Louis
blanked the Detroit Tigers, 5 to 0,
in the second game today after win
ning the first, 5 to 3.
Caldwell, on the mound for the
Browns in the nightcap, won his first
victory of the seosan.
St. L. AB H. O. A. Detroit. AB. H. O A.
Lary.ss _ 5 1 3 1 Rogell ss 4 2 3 5
Clift.3b 3 0 12 C’hrane.c 4 0 8 0
S't'rs.cf.lf 5 15 0 Gnger.'b 4 112
B mley.lb 5 2 13 2 Goslin.lf 3 0 10
Bell ltrf 3 110 Sim'ns.cf 4 12 0
Cole'n rf 4 10 0 Walker.rf 4 2 2 0
West.cf 0 0 0 0 Burns.!b. 4 18 1
Hemsley c 3 13 1 Owen.3b 3 111
Carey.2b 4 2 15 Rowe n 10 10
Thomas D 4 10 1 Bridges D 2 0 0 0
Knott.p . 0 0 0 2 *Pox O 0 0 0
1 White . 0 0 0 0
Totals 36 10 27 14 Totals 33 8 27
•Batted for Bridges in ninth Inning.
tRan for Cochrane in ninth inning.
St. Louis_ 101 120 000—5
Detroit _ .. - 010 001 010—3
Runs—Clift. Bottomley <21. Bell. Carey.
I Gehringer Goslin Simmons. Errors—
I None Runs batted in—Bottomley (2).
Thomas. Carey i2>. Simmons. Gehringer.
Walker Two-base hits—Carey (2). Bolters.
Bottomley. Owen. Three-base hit—
Walker Home runs—Simmons. Bottom
ley Gehringer. Double Dlays—Bottom
ley to Hemsley to Clift to Hemsley Rogell
to Gehringer to Burns. Left on bases—
St Louis. 8: Detroit 8. Bases on balls—
Off Rowe. 3: off Bridge. 1: off Thomas. 5.
Struck out—By Rowe 2: by Bridges 4:
I by Thomas 2. Hits—Off Rowe 8 in 4
! innings (none out in fifth inningl: off
Bridges. 2 in 5 Innings: off Thomas 8 in 8
innings <none out in ninth inningl: off
! Knott, none in 1 inning. Wild Ditch—
■ Rowe Winning Ditcher—Thomas. Los
I inr Ditcher—Rowe. UmDires—Messrs,
j Ormsby. McGowan and Quinn. Time—2:18.
St. L. A.B. H. O. A. Detroit A.B. H. O. A.
Lary.ss. 4 13 2 Rogell,ss 4 (I 2 1
I Clift.3b, 5 2 0 1 C'hrane.c 3 110
! Sol's.cf-lf 5 14 0 Hay'rth.c 10 10
I Bot'ley lb 5 4 10 o Oe'ger.2b 3 0 110
Bell.lf-rf 5 0 3 0 Goslin.lf. 4 110
Cole’an.rf 4 0 10 Sim'ns.cf 4 0 2 0
! West.cf_ 0 0 3 0 Walker.rf 3 0 10
Hems'y.c 2 2 0 0 Burns.lb 3 o 17 O
i O’lianl c 10 2 1 Owen 3b_ 3 110
i Carey.2b 3 118 Auker.p_ 10 0 3
C'dwell p 3 0 0 0 Lawson.p o o o 1
Kimsey.p o o o l
•White.. 110 0
tFox_ 10 0 0
Totals J37 *11 27 12 Totals.31 4 27 16
•Batted for Auker in sixth.
tBatted for Lawson In eighth.
St Louis _000 220 001—fi
Detroit _ 000 000 000—0
Runs—Lary Clift. Solters. Bottomley.
Caldwell. Error—Rogell. Runs batted in
—Coleman <1>. Hemsley <1). Clift (1).
Bottomley '2). Two-base hits—Clift.
Hemsley. Bottomley. Goslin. Three-base
hit—Hemsley. Stolen bases—Lary Sac
rifices—Lary. Caldwell. Left on bases—
St Louis. 9: Detroit.. 5. Bases on balls—
Off Auker. 2: off Caldwell. 1. Hita—Off
Auker 7 in « innings: off Lawson. 2 in
2 innings: off Kimsey. 2 in 1 inning.
Losing pitcher—Auker. Umpires—Messrs
McGowan. Quinn and Ormsby. Time—
2:00.
Rides to Glory
SPORTS SUCCOTASH.___—By JIM BERRYMAN.
THE STAR-SPONSORED
Crry or wash iMGTbAJ
tr^jmiS TourmEV Got
OFF TO A BANG -UR
B6QIMNIMG*
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BERTff /
MARATHOA
— Aa»d he clipper i
5 MIMUTCS OFF THE J
COURSE RECORD For ■
the amnual rum ...,
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ybUAia FELLER
DODGERS HAND TWO
BEATINGS TO GIANTS
Get Good Pitching, While Losers
Aid by Poor Work in Field.
Scores Are 9-6, 3-0.
By thi Associated Press.
BROOKLYN, May 30 —The Dodgers
swept a double-header with the
New York Giants today, winning, 9 to
6 and 3 to 0, through tight Brooklyn
1 pitching and weak hitting and fielding
I by the Giants.
| Watson Clark took the opener lor
his third victory of the season and Ed
Brandt hurled a three-hit shutout in
the nightcap.
A holiday crowd ol 38.000 turned out.
Errors by Dick Bartell let in two
runs in the opener and one in the
nightcap. Hank Lelber and Sam Les
lie hit homers in the first game.
New York. AB H O. A. Brook'd. AB.H. O A.
Moore.lf. 5 12 0 Borda'y.lf 5 1 O O
White d.2b 4 0 2 4 Cooney.cf 5 2 3 o
; Leslie.lb_ 4 2 0 0 stnpp.Ob 2 114
! Leiber.cf. 4 2 2 0 OeraS.Sb 0 0 0 0
Ott.rl_3 1 o O Hassett.lb 3 2 1« 1
Mancuso c 4 1 " Bucher.rf 3 2 2 0
i ‘Schurn'er 0 0 0 0 Frey.ss.. 3 3 2 4
1 Soencer.c 0 0 o 1 Jordan 7b ft 1 0 3
Mayo..'lb_ 4 0 2 2 Berres.e. 3 0 11
I Bartell.ss 3 0 4 4 Phelps.c. 2 110
I 'Ripple-- 1 O O O Clark.p - 3 111
j Oumbert.p O O O 1 Earns’w.p 10 0 1
Pitasim s.p .10 0 2
♦Terry-1 O O O
Totals.36 ~8 24 li Totals.36 13 27 15
•Ran for Mancuso In eighth.
'Batted for Bartell in ninth.
iBatted for Fitzsimmons in ninth.
Score by innings:
New York___202 001 010—6
Brooklyn_ 050 200 02*—9
Runs—Whitehead. Leslie <3i. Leiber <2>.
Bordagaray. Cooney r2>. Stripp. Bucher
|2>. Frey. Berres. Clark. Errors—Frey (2).
Whitehead, Bartell Fitzsimmons. Runs
batted in—Leiber (2), Cooney. Bucher (2).
Leslie 12), Prey <2). Msncuso <2). Phelps
,2). Two-base hits—Cooney Prey, Leiber.
Phelps. Three-base hit—Stripp. _ Home
runs—Leslie. Leiber. Stolen base—Bucher.
Sacrifices—Stripp. Frey. Left on bases—
New York. 4: Brooklyn. 14. Bases on balls
—Oil Gumbert. 4' off Fitzsimmons, ft: off
Clark. I. Struck out—By Fitzsimmons. 1:
by Clark. 1: by Earnshaw. 1. Hits—Off
Gumbert. 4 in i H innings: off Fitzsimmons.
9 in flVi innings: off Clark. 8 In , \ in
nings: off Earnshsw. 0 in 1H innings.
Winning pitcher—Clark. Losing pitcher—
Gumbert Umpires—Messrs. Ballanxsnt,
Kiem arid Sears Time, 2:15.
Sew York. AB.H. O. A Brook’n. AB.H. O. A.
Davis.lf..rf 4 0 4 0 Bord'y.If 4 2 7 0
White'd.2b 4 0 4 3 Cooney.cf 3 2 3 0
Leslie.lb_ 4 17 3 Frey.sa.- 3 0 11
Lelber.cf 4 0 10 Hassett.lb 4 0 4 0
Ott.rf_110 0 fBlcher.rf 3 2 3 0
Moore.lf. 2 0 3 0 Gera y.3b 4 110
Mancuso.c 2 0 3 0 Jordan.2b 4 0 2 1
Jacks'n.3b 3 10 0 Berres.e- 4 2 6 0
Bartell.ss 3 0 13 Brandt.p 2 0 0 1
Coffman.p 2 0 10
•Dannin* 1 O O o
Gabler.p. 0000 __
Totsls.29 ~3 24 8 Tot*l»-3t 9 27 3
•Batted for Coffman In eighth.
Score by innings:
New York__-_ooo ooo ooo—o
Brooklyn*... 001 000 02x—3
Runs—Bordagaray. Cooney. Bicher. Er
rors—Coffman. Bartell. Runs batted In—
Cooney. Oerathty. Two-base hits—-Borda
aaray. Leslie. Berres. Geraghty. Stolen base
—Berres. Sacrifice—Frey. Double ■’'ays—
Jordan to Hasaett Whitehead to Bartell to
Leslie. Whitehead to peslle. Left on bases
—New York 4: Brooklyn. 8. Bases on balls
—Off Coffman. 2: off Gabler. 1. off Brandt.
2 Struck out—Bt Coffman, 2: by Brandt
3 Hits—Off Coffman. 7 In 7 Innings, off
Gabler. 2 in L lnninc. Losine pitcher—
Coffman. Umpires—Messrs Klem. Sears
and Ballanfant. Time. 1:59.
Will Drive Again,
Meyer Declares
By the Aiaocltted Pren.
"INDIANAPOLIS, May 30.—Cham
1 -plon of aU speedway champions,
Louis Meyer, Just 32 years old and
the only three-time winner In the
history of the 500-mile Indianapolis
marathons, said today as he sat in
the winner’s lnclosure:
“Tell every one for me that I
am not going to Quit Just because
I won for the third time. I am
not through with racing. Racing
Is what I like most. I am going
to be back in there next year to
win. Just wait and see.’’
The average race driver consid
ers his competitive career complete
If he once gets the checkered flag
at the speedway. Louis also won
In 1938 and 1933. but he described
today’s grind, in which he set a
ntw mark, as tha most fun.
BUCS’ LATE RALLIES
SUBDUE CUBS TWICE
Annex Opener in Ninth, 7-5. and
Get 5 Bans in Eighth in
ll-to-7 Pinal.
By the Associated Press.
r^HICAGO, May 30.—Late-inning
^ rallies gave Pittsburgh both ends
of their holiday double bill with the
Chicago Cub6, before 43,332 fans to
day.
The Bucs took the second game. 11
to 7, mainly through a flve-run burst
in the eighth, after winning the
opener, 7 to 5, on Brubaker’s ninth
inning double, which drove in two
runs.
Pitts. AB. H. O. A. Chl. AB. H O A.
Jensen.If 5 3 ft O Hack.3b ft n O 3
L.Wa’r.cf 3 0 2 0 H man 2b 5 4 4 3
L'g'tto.2b 3 12 2 Galan.cf 5 12 1
Vauc'n.ss 4 12 2 O Dea c 3 2 4 1
Suhr.lb 3 2 8 2 D’m’ee.rf 3 ,0 3 0
Brub’r.3b 5 12 0 Allen.lf 4 12 0
Hafey.rf ft 1 o 0 G'mm.lb 4 0 0 1
Padden.c 4 0 5 1 Juraesjs 4 2 2 3
Lucas.n 2 1 1 ft Lre.p 10 10
Swift.p . 1 0 0 0 French.p o O O O
Root.p._ O O O 1
•Gill... 10 0 0
Totals 35 10 27 12 Totsls.35 10 27 13
•Batted for Root in ninth.
Pittsburgh _ OOO OOO 502—7
Chicago _ 100 020 200—S
Runs—Jensen. L. Waner. Lavagetto.
Vaughan. Hafey. Padden. Lucas. Hack.
Herman. Jurges >1), Root. Errors—Bru
baker. Jurges Runs batted in—Jensen.
Lavagetto. Vaughan Suhr. Brubaker <-).
Lucas. W. Herman <21 Galan <2>. ODea.
Two-base hits—Jensen Lavagetto. Bru
baker, W Herman. ODea. Sacrifice—
Lee. Double plays—Suhr and Vaughan:
Lucas Padden and Suhr: Jurges. Herman
and Grimm: Herman and Grimm. Leu
on bases—Pittsburgh. f>: Chicago. 7. Bases
on Balls—Off Lucas 2: off Swift. 1: off
Lee. 5: off French 2: off Root. ). Struck
out—By Lucas. 2: by Swift 1: by Lee. 2:
by Root, 2. Hits—Off Lucas. 7 in ti in
nings (one out in seventhi; off Swift. :i
in 3 Innings: oft Lee. 7 in 6*3 innings:
off French, n in n Innings (Ditched to
two meni: off Root 3 in 2's innings.
Winning Ditcher—Swift. Losing pitcher—
Root. Umpires—Messrs. Pflrman. Stewart
and Pinelli. Time—2:24.
Pitts. AB.H. O. A. Chi. AB.H. O. A.
Jensen.lf 5 2 2 0 Hack.3b 5 10 1
Schulte.cf 5 3 10 W.H'n.2b. 4 3 2 4
Lav'to.2b 5 0 4 5 Galan.cf 3 15 0
Vaug'n.ss 4 13 4 Ha'nett c 3 0 5 0
Suhr.lb 2 0 11 1 Dem'ee.rf 4 0 0 0
Bru k'r.3b 5 10 2 Allen.lf_ 4 0 2 0
Hafey.rf_ 5 2 3 0 G’mm.lb 4 2 11 1
Todd.c 5 3 3 0 Jurges.ss 3 114
B'kofer.p 110 0 H'shaw.p 0 0 0 0
Tislng.p.. 1 0 0 3 Bryant.p 2 2 0 1
•Lucas . 1 0 0 0 W'neke.p 0 0 11
Brown.p 0 0 0 1 {Gill ... 1 0 0 0
♦L.Waner 1 1 o o
Bush.p.. 10 0 0
Totals 4114 27 16 Totals 33 10 27 12
"Batted for Tisin* in seventh.
tBatted for Brown In eighth
JBatted for Warneke In ninth.
Pittsburgh _ 040 000 052—11
Chicago _ 200 201 000— i
Runs—Vaughan (2V. Suhr <21. Bruba
ker <21. Hafey <21. Todd <2>. L. Waner.
W. Herman. Galan. Grimm (3). Jurges
(2). Errors—Schulte Tlsing <21. Hack.
Runs batted in—Jensen (2). Schulte (21,
Brubaker, Hafey <3), Todd <3). Hack (3).
Galan <21. Bryant <21. Two-base hits—
Schulte. Hafey <2). Hack. Jurges. Home
runs—Todd Galan. Sacrifices—Jurges,
Bryant. Double nlaya—Laragetto and
Suhr (21: Lavagetto. Suhr and Vaughan:
Brown. Vaughan and 8uhr; Hack. Her
man and Orimm. Left on bases—Pitts
burgh. 7: Chicago. 3. Bases on balls—
Off Blrkofer 1: off Tlainc. 1: off Hen
shaw. 2: off Bryant. 2. Struck out—Bor
Tlsing. 2: by Bryant. 4. Hits—Off Blr
kofer. 5 in 1 Vi innings: off Tlsing. 4 in
4% innings; off Brown. 1 in 1 inning: off
Bush. 0 in 2 innings: off Henshaw. 4 in
4a,b Innings: off Bryant. 5 in 5H innings
(none out in eighth); off Warneke. 5 In
2 Innings. Winning pitcher—Brown. I»s
ing pitcher—Bryant. Umpires—Messrs.
Stewart. Pinelli and Pflrman. Time—
2:06.
NATIONAL CITY TILTS
Nines of Two Sections Listed for
Games Today.
Following are scheduled sandlot
base ball games today in the National
City League:
<A League.)
Miller Furniture vs. Blue Flams Valet
on East Ellipse.
Shady Grove vs. Heurich Brewers on
South Ellipse.
Plata Wine & Liquor vt. Union Printer!
on No. 6 (West Potomac).
Dixie Pigs vs. W. O. W. Elm at Rtverdale.
(B League.)
Rosa Jewelers vs. Regal Clothing Co. on
No. 3 (Monument).
Old Manhattan vs. Nolan Motors on No.
11 (West Potomac).
_Foetal Telegraph vs. D. O. 8. on No. 1
(Palrlawni
W. O. W. Oak vs. National Novelty on
Taft Diamond. _ . .
(All games atari at • MU
FIRST TO CAPTURE
EVENT THIRD TIME
Also Breaks Speed Record,
Driving Without Relief.
Horn, Rose Next.
(Continued From First Page.)
earned about $35,000, of which $20,000
was first prize money, with the addi
tional coming from lap prizes and
checks from accessory manufacturers*.
He snatched the lead at the 225-mile
mark, when Babe Stapp of Lo6 Ange
les and Wilbur Shaw of Indianapolis,
at that time the flying leaders, ran
into trouble.
The car driven by Stapp. tearing
along the back stretch at terrific speed,
broke a rear axle, forcing him out of
the race. Shaw had to stop at the
pits to replenish his fuel supply and
then Meyer bounded into the lead.
He retained it for only a short time,
however, when he was forced to stop
feu* gasoline. He quickly regained it
and with a terriffic burst of speed that
carried him around the 2 Vi-mile brick
and asphalt track at a rate of 115
miles per hour he clung to the lead
to the finish.
nucu ttuuut «72 iuura itum me
checkered flag he reduced his speed
to about 98 miles an hour to save
gasoline. When he brought his car
to a stop there was a pint and a half
of fuel in his tank and three gallons
in bis pits.
His face smeared with grease, Meyer
said today's race was the mo6t enjoy
able in which he ever participated
because he did not know until the
flnisfti that he was going to triumph.
Record Crowd Watches.
'T'HE record-breaking crowd of 166,
000 spectators, lured to the track
as a result of 31 tragic deaths since
racing was started in 1908, saw only
one accident today. A1 Miller of De
troit sustained a fractured left leg.
Roaring down the stretch in full sight
of thousands of spectators in the
stands lining the track, he was injured
when the front axle broke and his
speeding car cracked into a guard
rail. The car swerved back onto the
course with Miller’s mechanic. Jimmy
Jackson, Indianapolis, still sitting in
it. The race was immediately slowed
down to 60 miles an hour while the
wrecked car was hauled off the course.
Jackson jumped to safety.
Miller was thrown out of the car and
slid acroef the track. The car smashed
into the guard rail with terrific force,
with a piece of the rail piercing the
hood and shooting back almost to the
seats. Miller lo6t part of his left leg
in a motor cycle accident several years
ago and today's fracture was on the
same member.
“I’m pretty lucky,” he said as he
was being lifted into an ambulance.
“I just broke my ‘wooden leg,”* he
said.
The fracture was betvfcen the knee
and the hip and may necessitate fur
ther amputation.
Only Mishap of Race.
'T'HAT was the only accident of the
1 race and the safety of the newly
constructed turns, guarded with re
taining walls, was proven.
It was the first time in years that
the race was run without a death or
a serious accident.
The "tough luck” driver of the race
was William (Shorty) Cantlon of De
troit, who was never out of fifth place
and always a dangerous challenger
after the first 100 miles had been
reeled oil. With only seven lap6 to
go and clinging tenaciously to third
place. Cantlon ran out of gas.
Misfortune eliminated the pre-race
favorites early. Wild BUI Cummings
Qf Indianapolis, winner of the race
in 1934, never started. His car balked
as the starting field roared away, due
to his clutch sticking. He worked
frantically over it for half an hour
while the other drivers roared on, but
could not get it started. Then he
quit in despair.
Youthful Rex Mays, the 23-year-old
blond boy from Los Angeles, one of
the pre-race favorites, shot into the
lead at the start- but after leading
for 13 laps was forced into the pits by
motor trouble, and finally ran out of
gas In the final stages of the race
after he had worked himself back Into
sixth position. Freddy Frame. Los
Angeles, winner in 1932. surrendered
after 7^2 miles, due to a broken spring.
Rides in New Aut*.
A/f EYER, after changing his clothes,
rode away from the track in a
brand-new car presented him. Mrs.
Meyer was at the wheel. An attrac
tive blond of 31, married for 10 years
to the new champion, said she “didn’t
mind if Louie continued to race as
long as he won.”
“I was excited from the start, but I
knew he would win this time," she
said.
Their son. Louis, jr.. 5 years old, re
mained home in California while his
daddy was hanging up the triple vic
tory.
The car Mrs. Meyer drove Louis
back to his hotel in was the pace car
which her husband had won as the
leader of the 200th lap.
In the back seat was Meyer's hys
terical mechanic and his girl friend.
Minor Leagues
IniernatieaaL
Newark. 10—#: Baltimore. 5—5.
Buffalo. 9—0: Toronto. 1—4.
Albary. R—0; Syracuse. 4—5.
Rochester. 8—2: Montreal. 7—14.
American Association.
Toledo. fi—9; Columbus. 1—10.
Minneapolis. 12: 8t. Paul. 4.
Mllwaukee-Kansas City. rain.
Southern Association.
Chattanooga. 5: Atlanta. 1.
Knoxville. B: Nashville. 1.
Memphis. 0: New Orleans. 4.
South Atluntie.
Jacksonville. A—3: Columbus. 4—4.
Savannah. R; Macon. 3.
Columbia. 4; Augusta. 2.
Naw York-Penn.
felnghamton. 6—4: Elmira, 0—10.
.illentown. 8: York. 0.
Williamsport. 12—R: Hazleton. 8—7.
Wilkes-Barre. 11: Scranton, 0.
Piedmont.
Richmond. 14—3: Asheville. 3—2.
Texas.
Beaumont. 8—3: Galveston. 6—7.
Tulsa. S—13: Port Worthf 0—0.
Oklahoma City, 4—3: Dallas. 2—2.
Houston. 7—2; Sun Antonio. 2—3.
Pacific Coast.
8an Diego. 8—7; San Pranciaco. 3—12
Missions. 10—6: Los Angeles. 8—8.
Sacramento. 11—3: Portland. 10—7.
Seattle. 7—8: Oakland. 8—7.
Western League.
Sioux City. 12—8: Des Moines. 7—3.
Waterloo. 8: Cedar Rapids, 6.
Davenpoi t. 7; Omaha. 2.
GIVE CARDS SPLIT
Come in 7-4 Second-Game
Victory After Opener
Is Dropped, 1-10.
By the Associated Press.
ST. LOUIS, May 30—Two home
runs by Jim Collins and one
each by Joe Medwick and
Stuart Martin enabled the St
Louis Cardinals to come back with s
7-to-4 victory over Cincinnati In the
nightcap after losing the first game
of the Decoration day double-header
today, 10 to 1, before 25,000 fans.
Cln'tl. AB. H. O. A. St. L. AB. H. O. A
Myers.ss. 2 13 6 Moore.cf. 4 U 3 (
Thev’w.ss 2 0 1 3 8. M’n.2b 4 13'!
Chap'n.rf 5 3 O 0 J. M’ln.rf 4 0 11
Scar’la.lb 5 213 1 M wick.lt 4 12 1
Rlkis,3b. 5 111 Coins.lb 4 2 8]
Camob'l.c 4 2 3 1 Our’er.ss 3 O 5 ‘
Good n.lt 6 3 0 0 Verses,3b 3 1 3 1
Byrd.ct— 4 2 2 0 Og'skkc, 3 0 2]
Kam'ls.2b 4 13 0 P. Dean n 2 1 o <
Hoi rth.p 4 3 10 Hal han.p (I O 0 1
-Ryba.n_o o o (
Totals.40 18 27 17 •Fullis.. 10 0 1
Tfttole *>•> M 07 1 •
•Batted for Hallahan in eighth.
Cincinnati _ 010 005 211—If
8t. Louia_ 100 000 000— J
Runs—Chapman (2). Scarsella. Rlges,
Campbell <2i. Goodman, Kampouris. Hol
lingsworth (2). 8. Martin. Errors—Myers
8. Martin. Therenow. Runs batted in—
Medwick. Goodman, Scarsella <5). Camp
bell Byrd (21. Riggs Two-base hits—
Medwick. Verges. Campbell, Scarsella
Three-base hits — Scarsella. Chapman
Home run—Goodman. Stolen base—S
Martin. Sacrifice—Myers. Double plays—
Myers to Kampouris. Myers to Kampourn
to Scarsella. Durocher to S. Martin tc
Collins <2), Collins to Durocher. Left or
bases—Cincinnati. 5: St. Louis, 4. Basel
on balls—Off Hallahan. 1. Struck out—
By Hollingsworth. 3: by P. Dean. 1; by
Hallahan. 1. Hits—OH P. Dean. 8 in n'i
innings; off Ryba. 3 in 1 Inning: off Hal
lahan. 7 in 2*5 innings. Passed ball—
Ogrodowskl. Losing pitcher—P Dean
Umpires—Messrs. Barr, Goetz and Rear
don. Time. 2:06.
Cin'tl. ABHOA St L. AB. H. O. A
Chap n,If 3 110 Moore,cf 4 o 4 (
Good'n.rf 4 1 2 0 8. M'n,2b 4 3 2 !
Scar la.lb 3 0 0 0 1 (
Lomb’dl.c 4 16 1 1 i
Riggs.2b_ 4 10 1 Colllns.lb 4 3 6'
Byrd.cf-, 2 0 10 D cher.ss 4 13:
Thev’w.ss 4 0 2 5 Gelbert.ss 0 o o i
Kam is.2b 3 13 6 Vergez.3b 4 0 1)
Der'ger.p 3 O o 1 Davis.c— 3 14 1
•Herman, lioo og'ski.c. 1 o 4 (
♦Campbell 1 0 0 0 Winford.p 3 0 11
SCuyler- 1 0 0 0 IKing_0 0 O <
Totals.33"a 24 14 Totals.35 12 27 H
•Batted for Byrd in ninth.
♦Batted for Kampouris in ninth.
{Batted for Derringer in ninth.
tRan for Davis in seventh.
Cincinnati -_lol non 002—4
St. Louis_-_ 300 100 03*—7
Runs—Goodman (2), Riggs. Herman. 8
Martin t‘2>. J. Martin. Medwick <2), Col
lins (21. Errors—Verges. Winlord. Runs
batted in—Lombardi. Medwick <3>. Collins
<31. Herman 12>. S. Martin. Two-bast
hits—J. Martin (2). Riggs. Three-base
hit—J. Martin. Home runs—Medwick.
Coiling <21. S Martin. Herman. Stolen
bases—S Martin <21. Double plays—
8. Martin to Durocher to Collins; Duro
cher to S. Martin to Collins: Kampouris
to Thevenow to Scarsella. Left on bases—
Cincinnati. 4: St Louis. 4. Bases on
balls—Winford 12). Struck out—-By Der
ringer, 4; by Winford. 7. Wild Pitch—
Derringer. Umpires—Messrs. Goetz. Rear
don and Barr. Time, 1:53.
HOMERS MD TRIBE
TO TAKE TWO TILTS
Trosky Gets One in Each Clash
as White Sox Are Trounced,
4 to 3 and 11 to 3.
By the Associated Press.
CLEVELAND, May 30—Ckvelanc
^ swamped the Chicago White Sox
11 to 3, today to win both games of s
doubleheader witnessed by a holidaj
crowd of 22.0C0 persons.
The Tribe took the first game. 4 to 3
Trosky hit a home run in each gam<
and Averill and Radclifle contributed
circuit blows In the second contest.
Chicago. AB. H. O. A. Clev. AB. H. O. A
R'dcllfle.lf 5 12 1 Gsvitxer.rf 4 2 2 1
Kr vich.cf 4 2 10 K b'ker.ss 2 O 1 ■
Haas.rf-- 4 2 2 0 Hale.:sb_- 4 2 1*
Bonura.lb 4 2 10 « Ayerlll cf 4 0 3 i
| Dykes.3b_ 3 0 0 .3 Trosky.lb 4 2 13
Piet 2b_2 10 3 Sullivan c 4 2 2
! Mor sey.ss 4 0 14 Vosmik.lf. 4 2 2 <
Grube.c_ 3 0 2 1 Hughes.2b 3 o .3 .
Whit'h'd.p .3104 Brown.P- 2 0 0:
Hayes*_ 1 0 0 0 *
Totals.33 ~9 24 To Totals-31 10 27 li
•Batted for Whitehead in ninth._
Chicago ______ 000 012 000—.
Cleveland_ 000 201 10X—i
Runs—Piet. Morrissey. Whitehead Ga
lauer. Hale. Trosky (2). Errors—Mot
rissey. Knickerbocker. Runs batted In—
Trosky 42). Vosmik. Hale. Radclifle < 2)
Bonura. Two-base hits—Trosky. Rad
ciifle. Home run—Trosky. Sacrifices—
Dvkes. Brown. Grube. Knickerbocker
Double plays—Brown. Knickerbocker am
Trosky: Galatser and Sullivan. Left oi
basrs—Chicago. 10; Cleveland. 7. Base
on balls—Ofl Brown. 5: off Whitehead. 2
Strikeouts—By Brown. 1: by Whitehead
2. Umpires—Messrs. Geisel, Hubbard ant
Dinneen. Time—-: 00.
Chicago. AB. H. O. A. Clev. AJ5 H O. A
R dcliffe.lf 4 12 0 Gal tzer.rf 5 11
Kr’vich.ct 1 7 o K b'ker.ss 5 12
Haas.rf.- 4 0 10 Hale.Hb.. 4 12
Bonura.lb 4 0S0 Averill.cf. 512
Dykes..3b. 4 0 10 Trosky.lb 3 2 0
ptet.2b_ 2 0 0 0 Vosmik.lf. 4 1 .3
Hayes.2b. 2 2 12 Pytlak.c 4 2 .3
Sewell.c_ 3 2 2 o Hughes.2b 4 4 .3 •
Shea.c_ 1 0 0 0 Blaeho'r.p 4 1 2 t
Mor’sey.ss 4 0 2 4
Caln.p_ 2 0 0 1
Evans,p__ 10 0 1
Totals-34 6 24 8 Totals.38 14 27 1
Chicago_oio ooi inn— ;
Cleveland __ 000 524 00*—1
Runs—Radclille. Piet. Hayes. Galatier
Hale (2). Averill. Troskv <3K Vosmik (2)
Pitlak. Hughes. Errors — Knickerbocker
Hale. Hughes. Runs batted in—Hughes *5>
Vosmik <2>. Blaeholder l"). Averill. Troskj
Radclifle. Sewell. Morrissey. Two-base hit
—Haves, Kreevich. Home runs—Averll.
Trosky. Radclifle. Stolen base—Knick
erbocker. Double play—Hale to Hughe
to Trosky. Left on bases—Chicago. 5
Cleveland. 8. Bases on bails—Off Blae
holder. 1; ofl Cain. 2; ofl Evans. 3. Strike
outs—By Blaeholder. 3: by Cain 1. Hit
—Ofl Cain. 10 in 4<3 innings: off Evans
4 in U's innings. Wild pitch—Evans
Losing pitcher—Cain. Umpires—Messrs
Hubbard. Dinneen and Oeisel. Time—2:21
I • LOUIS MEYER
How They Finished in Auto Race
By the Associated Press.
INDIANAPOLIS, May 30.—The finish of the twenty-fourth
500-mile race, with the times:
Miles
Driver. Home. Per Hour.
1— Lou Meyer Los Angeles 109.069
2— Ted Horn Los Angeles 108.170
3— Mauri Rose Dayton. Ohio 107.864
♦—Kelly Petillo Los Angeles
Doc MacKenzie Eddington, Pa. 107.460
5— Chet Miller Detroit 106.919
6— Ray Pixley Fullerton, Calif. 105.253
7— Wilbur Shaw Indianapolis 104.233
8— George Barringer Houston, Tex. 102.630
8—Zeke Meyer Germantown, Pa. 101.824
10—George Connor Loo Angela 98J31
AND AFTER SWIMMING &
DIVING EYE ENJOY THE
LOLLING IN THE SUN ON THE
/open daily „
9 AM. TO 11*30 P. M.
INCLUDING LOCKER, H
If#
FOR. KIDDIE? UNDER, 12. 0
40* JJ
POR, ADULT? j!r
A
1 have owned several makes of
cars, but my new Dodge has
plenty on the ball,.,
• . . when it comes to saving
gas and oil. I’m getting 20
miles to the gallon of gas .. .
,., which is 4 more miles per
gallon than I used to get with
my old, smaller car ..,
In
why this new Dodge is called
i the “Beauty Winner’’ of
1936 . . . _
---——
t . ~ — . *■ —J
I have never had a car that has
given me such complete all
around satisfaction.
Thank you Mr. Hubbell!
You are only one of the
thousands of Dodge owners
everywhere who tell us about
the amazing economy of their
cars . .. who say Dodge gives
them from 18 to 24 miles per
gallon of gasoline. And many
of them say Dodge is actually
costing them less to own and
operate than any car, big or
small, they ever owned before!
See this new Dodge todayl
Drive it! Take the free economy
test—see how Dodge saves on
gasoline! Then you will under*
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Dodge cars than any other
make with the exception of the
three lowest-priced cars!
DODGE
NEW LOW FIRST COST
$aad up.
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NOW at Factory.
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-DODGE

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