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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 01, 1936, Image 62

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TACTICAL SCHOOL REVEALS SUPREME AIR INTELLIGENCE!
<1) A group of the officer students at the most distinctive air school, the Air Corps Tac- «
tical School, at Montgomery, Ala. (2 and 3) A swirl of airplanes in maneuvers typical of those
elaborate formations worked out at the school. (4) More than 2,000 acres comprise the campus
and flying field of the Tactical School.
WAR COLLEGE FOR AVIATION
Institution Established in Alabama by Army Air Corps Has
Military Spirit in Highest Degree, and Serves Also •
Navy and Marine Corps—Once International.
By F. Jay Carmody.
NDER peaceful blue skies from
which the sun sprays gold on
the Alabama countryside the
more subtle aspects of the art
of war are being taught today in the
most distinctive aviation school in the
United States.
One might, indeed, speak even more
definitely and say that the school Is
the most unusual institution of mili«
tary education on the face of the
spherical clod over which man has
fought since his species first climbed
from its oozy surface.
The institution in question is the
Tactical Schoof of the Army Air
Corps. It is regarded in Washington,
where the idea for it was first con
ceived, as one of the most astute
creations in the brief, spectacular ca
reer of military aviation. To it the
Nation may look for a signal contri
bution to the integration of the vari
ous military arms which will make its
borders impregnable to enemy armies.
In effect, the Tactical School is a
war college of the air. Although not
called such, military parlance being
yhat it is, the Tactical School is a
'graduate institution—at least the lay
man's conception of it. It Is that to
the extent that its function is to take
already trained and mature officers,
men chosen by severe selective proc
esses, and prepare them for major
tasks in their country’s first line of
defense.
At the school they do not use the
phrase "first line of defense" as de
scriptive of the field for which gradu
ates are being prepared. There are
traditions, you know. Yet the civilian
permitted to watch the operations of
the school, live briefly with its stu
dents and faculty and study its curric
ulum must come away from Montgom
ery with the impression that he has
had a close-up of the intelligence
which is creating and will direct the
first barrier to enemy invasion. •
The ultimate wisdom in the use of
air force is the teaching objective of
the air school at Maxwell Field. Stated
another way, it prepares carefully
chosen officers for the staff and com
mand duties, which require the high
est degree of military intelligence, if
the greatest Nation on earth is not to
be invaded some day by another power
ranked lower in the estimate of Ameri
cans.
'A LTHOUGH an air school, neither
the student body nor the faculty
Is completely drawn from that branch
of the military establishment. Every
arm of the service—Infantry, Artillery,
Cavalry, Chemical Warfare—sends its
teaching and student representatives
to Maxwell. The Navy contributes
similarly, and so does the Marine
Corps. Thus does Uncle Sam broaden
the education of his military officers.
Thus does he consolidate the various
branches of the service.
The time was, Indeed, when the Tac
tical School was international in its
scope. Foreign military establishments
sent students to it at the invitation of
Washington.
This practice, however, led to com
plications which forced its abandon
ment. In military schools, It seems,
It is the custom to call a spade a
spade and to call a potential enemy
by its actual name. The presence of
military representatives of potential
enemies in the Classes served as a
limitation upon this custom. It proved
disconcerting to every one, including
the foreign representatives in the
school who, themselves, were brought
up in the tradition of calling world
powers by their right names, not
aliases. So, in this characteristic at
least, the sohool reverted to type
among military Institutions.
The civilian visiting the school Is
Impressed first with the attitude of
‘ Its staff and its students. Here is the
layman’s conception of the graduate
school at its best. Its curriculum is
highly specialized, but the fighting
man never is submerged in the schol
ar. That slogan "Uncle Sam Builds
Men" on the old recruiting posters
apparently still applies when he has
completed work on their torsos and
turned his major attention to their
minds.
Obviously, it is the Army’s way to
look upon Its members as unities of
the physical and mental. Although
training of the mind Is the primary
function at Maxwell, there Is no abate
ment of the stress laid upon physical
perfection. The result, and the lay
i
man cannot help but be impressed by
it, is a body of graduate students
approaching middle life which ex
cels any similar group in the United
States in physical appearance. There
are no academic anemics at Max
well.
Every facility for vigorous outdoor
exercise, with recreation time delib
erately provided for its use, is pro
vided on the 2,200-acre reservation.
There are an 18-hole golf course, ten
nis courts, swimming pool, riding
horses, bridle paths, squash and vol
ley ball courts.
Riding is the only form of exer
cise that is on the compulsory list and
the one most difficult, apparently, to
reconcile with the aviation tempera
ment. Apparently, the transition
from the most progressive form of
transportation to one of the most
primitive types involves too sharp a
psychologic adjustment.
A NOTHER phase of the school
which stamps it as unique among
institutions of higher learning is the
relationship between faculty and stu
dents.
For the most part, the two groups
are of the same age. They have
grown up together since West Point,
the war or at whatever place or time
they, acquired their first gold bars.
They have lived side by side for years,
flown together and have been asso
ciated, on duty and off, for many
years. One could not reasonably ex
pect a master-and-disclple relation
ship to evolve out of that kind of
human experience. It definitely has
not.
/viiuuier ciruumaiauue mat scua me
school apart Is that the art, or
science, of military aviation is not
teachable by standard methods of
pedagogy. In few of its phases, cer
tainly not those taught in such an
advanced school, does the subject
have the fixity and finality that
marks those taught in civilian
schools. Aviation changes constantly,
and the instructor who forgot the
fluidity of his subject, even briefly,
might And it slipping out of his
hands at any moment. Or it might
be tom out of his hands by a student
body vastly more curious and aggres
sive and above all aware than any
student body one is likely to meet
elsewhere.
Underneath the veneer of levity that
is inevitable in a school where every
one has known every one else for
years, there is a deadly seriousness.
School never really is "out” from one
end of the nine-month term to the
other for those at Maxwell
The schedule calls for lecture at
tendance live mornings a week, from
9 o'clock until noon, with the after
noons devoted alternately to quizzes
(the four-hour variety) or the prac
tical testing in actual flight of tactical
lessons learned in the class room. A
midweek half-holiday is given Wed
nesday afternoons and the students
and faculty have Saturday and Sunday
to themselves.
This would seem to give the Tactical
School student substantially as much
liberty as is customary in institutions
of higher learning. But he never really
gets away from his subject, or his sub
jects.
At the officers’ mess.' where many
students and some faculty members
take their midday meals, the subject
always is aviation; a phase of It def
initely related to the work of the
school. Walking between shots on' the
golf course, the players limit their
conversation usually to the subject
which is so major that there is no
room for minor ones.
“QNLY on the bridle path," one stu
dent explained, “do we get away
from the main theme, and that is not
that we like aviation less, but hate
horses more."
Under the flippancy there is a
truth that startles the layman, even
the one familiar With the tendency of
the airman to stay with his own kind
and “talk shop.”
The busy social life which the
civilian is disposed to regard as the
chief activity of the warrior in peace
time is notable for its absence at the
Alabama post. For all the presence of
the usual number of wives and chil
dren at Maxwell, one lives there in a
thoroughly masculine world—and an
intense, preoccupied one—from Mon
day morning until Friday afternoon.
In the Interval between, the social
side of the aerial warrior and his wife
A
has an opportunity to express itself,
but the end of activity of this type is
to give the student a character and
quality of relaxation that will facili
tate his school work.
By Sunday evening an air of studi
ous quiet settles over the post. Lights
burning until midnight in the various
quarters, save on Friday and Satur
day, have the very sober meaning that
a man sliding toward middle age has
mastered the art of study far beyond
the degree his parents hoped when he
was a little boy.
i . .
It does not fit in with the standard
conception of the military airman. As
If he were entirely ignorant of his re
sponsibility to be the most romantic of
uniformed men, he fights solitary bat
[ ties with maps and texts that are as
far removed from glamour as Is the
routine of the least of the citizens he
might have to defend some day.
By the time the layman makes this
discovery of the Tactical School's way
(Continued on Sixth Page.)
& *
Photoplays in Washington Theaters This Week
WEEK OF
NOVEMBER 1.
Academy
8th and O Sta. 8.E.
Ambassador
18th and Columbia Rd.
Apollo
624 H St. N.E.
Arcade
Hyattavllle. Md.
Ashton
Clarendon. Va.
Avalon
6612 Connecticut Ave.
Avenue Grand
645 Pa, Ave. 8.E.
Cameo
Mount Rainier. Md.
Carolina
I
11th and N. C. Ave. 8.E.
Central
426 9th St. N.W.
Circle
2105 Pa. Ave. N.W.
Colony
Oa. Ave. and Farraxut
Dumbarton
1343 Wig, Ave. NW.
Fairlawn
Anacostla. D. C.
Hippodrome
K near 9th
Home
13th and C 8tg. N.E.
Jesse
18th nr. R. 1. Ave. N.E.
Lee
Falla Church. Va.
Little
Oth between F and O
Milo
Rockville. Md.
Palm
Del Ray, Va._
Penn
660 Pa, Ave. BE._
Princess
1110 H St. N.E.
Richmond
Alexandria. Va. I
Savoy
8030 14th Bt. NW.
Seco
Silver Spring. Md.
Stanton
6th and C Sta. N.E.
State
Betheada. Md.
State •
Rail8 Church. Va.
Sylvan
104 R. L Are. N.W.
Takoma
rakoma Park. D. O.
Tivoli
14th and Park Rd.
Uptown
Conn. Ave. A Newark Bt.
York
Oa. at*, and Qoekaa
1
Sunday
Bobby Breen in
"Let’s Sine Again.”
Claire Trevor in
_"Human Cargo.” _
Marlon Davies and
Clark Oable
In
"Cain and Mabel."
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire
in
"Swingtime."
Warner Oland and
Keye Luke In
“Chan at Race Track."
Cart. Novelty. News.
Dark.
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
“The Gorgeous
Hussy."
Warner Oland
In
"Charlie Chan at the
Race Track."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor In
"Gorgeous Hussy.”
Cartoon. News.
Jane Withers In
"Little Miss Nobody."
Laurel and Hardy In
"The Bohemian Girl."
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire in
"Swlnatime.”
Our Gang comedy.
Francis Lederer and
Ann Sothern in
“My American Wife."
News. Comedies.
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Hussy."
W. C. Fields and
Rochelle Hudson in
"Poppy.”
News. Comedy.
Eleanore Whitney in
"Three Cheers for
Love."
Comedies._
Bing Crosby and
Bob Burns In
"Rhythm on Range.”
"March of Time.'*
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Huaay."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in "The
Gorgeous Hussy.”
Cartoon.
Dark.
"The Constant
Nymph."
Wallace Beery and
Cecilia Parker in
“Old Hutch.”
Cart. Novelty. News.
Fredrlc March and
Olivia de Havllland In
“Anthony Adverse.”
Cart. Mat., 2 p.m.
William Powell and
Myrna Loy
in
"The Great Ziegfeld."
Bobby Breen In
Let’s Sing Again."
Jack Holt in
Crash Donovan.”
Dark.
Francis Lederer and
Ann Sothern
In
"My American Wife.”
Myrna Loy and
Warner Baxter In
"To Mary With Love.”
"March of Time."
Frances Langford In
"Palm Springs ”
Henry Hunter In
"Parole,"
Btar Crosby in
"Rhythm on tha
Range."
Comedy. News.
Wallace Beery In
“Old Butch.**
Will Rogers and
Janet Oaynor In
"State Fair.”
Comedy. Cartoon.
Bing Crosby
In
"Rhythm on tha
_Range.”
William Powell and
Myrna Loy
In
“The Great Ziegfeld."
Ginger Rogers and'
Fred Astaire
in
"Swlnatime.”
Fredrlc March and
Olivia de Havllland
"Anthony Adverse.”
Monday
Bobby Breen In
"Let's Sing Again.”
Claire Trevor in
"Human Cargo.”_
Marlon Davies and
Clark Gable
in
"Cain and Mabel.
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire
in
"Swlngtlme."
Warner Oland and
Keye Luke in
"ChanatRaceTrack."
Cart. Novelty. News.
Wallace Beery and
Cecilia Parker in
"Old Hutch.”
Our Gang comedy.
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
“The Gorgeous
Hussy."_
Warner Oland
In
"Charlie Chan at the
Race Track."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"Gorgeous Hussy.”
Cartoon. News.
Jane Withers in
"Little Miss Nobody.”
Laurel and Hardy In
"The Bohemian Girl."
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire in
"Swingtime.”
Our Gang comedy.
Francis Lederer and
Ann Sothern in
"My American Wife.”
News. Comedies.
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Hussy."
W. C. Fields and
Rochelle Hudson in
"Poppy."
News. Comedy. _
Eleanore Whitney in
"Three Cheers for
Love."
_Comedies._
Bing Crosby #nd
Bob Burns in
"Rhythm on Range.”
"March of Time."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
“The Gorgeous
_Hussy."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in "The
Gorgeous Hussy."
Cartoon.
Warner Oland
in
"Chan at the
_Circus."
"The Constant
Nymph.”
Wallace Beery and
Cecilia Parker in
"Old Hutch."
Cart. Novelty. News.
Fredrlc March and
Olivia de Havllland in
"Anthony Adverse."
n and 8:-K> p.m.
William Powell and
I Myrna Loy
i in
"The Great Zlegfeld."
Bobby Breen In
"Let's Sine Again."
Jack Holt in
"Crash Donovan.’
Barbara Stanwyck and
Robert Taylor in
“His Brother's Wife.”
Ca||.. Novelty. News.
Francis Lederer and
Ann Sothern
In
"My American Wife."
Myrna Loy and
Warner Baxter in
."To Mary With Love.”
"March of Time."
Frances Langford in
"Pglm Springs.”
Henry Hunter In
"Parole.”
Bing Crosby in
'"Rhythm on the
Range.”
Comedy. News.
Wallace Beery In
■•Old Hutch.”
Will Rogers and
Janet Gaynor in
"State Fair."
Comedy. Cartoon.
Bing Crosby
in
"Rhythm on the
_Range.”
William Powell and
Myrna Loy
“The Great Zlegfeld."
Ginger Rogers and"
Fred Astaire
S^Fdfei^!
"Anthony Adverse.”
1
Tuesday
Francis Lederer in
"One Rainy After
noon" Henry Hun
ter In “Parole."
Marion Davies and
Clark Gable
in
"Cain and Mabel."
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire
in
"Swingttme."
George Raft and Do
lores Costello Barry
more In "Yours for
_the Asking."_
Wallace Beery and
Cecilia Parker In
"Old Hutch.”
Our Gang comedy.
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor m
"The Gorgeous
- Hussy."
Jeanette MacDonald
and Clark Gable
in
"San Francisco."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor In
"Gorgeous Hussy."
Cartoon. News.
Jean Heraholt in
"Sins of^dan."
Walter Huston in
"Rhodes."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
_Hussy.”
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Hussy."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Hussy."
Mary Ellis and
Walter Pldgion in
"Fatal Lady.”
_Comedy.
H°nry Fonda and
Pat Paterson in
"Spendthrift.”
"March of Time."
Jed^Prouty in
"Educating Father."
George Raft In
“It Had to Happen,".
Francis Lederer and |
Ann Sothern in
“My American Wife.”
"March of Time."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor In "The
Gorgeous Hussy."
Cartoon.
Warner Oland
in
I "Chan at the
1Circus."
•The Constant
Nymph."
Warren William and
June Travis in "Times
Souare Playboy."
Cart. Novelty. News.
I Busk Crosby and
Frances Farmer In
"Rhythm on the
r.ange." Novelties.
William Powell and
Myrna Loy
m
"The Great Ztegfeld."
Onslow Stevens in
"Easy Money."
Anne Shirley In
"M'Llsa." _
Barbara Stanwyck and
Robert Taylor In
"His Brother's Wife.”
Cart. Novelty. News.
Stuart Erwin and
Florence Rice In
"Women Are
"Trouble."
3Tg. Wells’ _
•Things to Come."
Short subjects.
News.
Anne Shirley In
"M’LlW."
Also "O'Shaugh
nessy’/ Boy." _
Joe E. Brown in
"Earthworm Trae
tora."
News. Comedy.
John Boles and
Rosalind Russell
In
"Craig's Wife."
Fredric March and
Olivia de Havllland in
“Anthony Adverse.”
tt and 8:30 P.m.
Warner Oland. "Chan
at the Race Track."
Also "Three Cheers
for Love.’*
William Powell and
Myrna Loy
In
‘The Oreat Ztegfeld."
Ginger Rogers and"
Fred Astaire
in
"Swlngtlroe."
In
‘‘Anthony Adverse."
J
Wednesday
Francis Lederer In
One Rainy After
noon." Henry Hun
_ter In "Parole."
Marion Davies and
Clark Gable
in
“Cain and Mabel."
Warner Baxter.
Fredric March and
June Lang in
"Road to Glory." 1
Claire Trevor and
Brian Donlevy
in
"Human Cargo
Wallace Beery and
Cecilia Parker in
"Old Hutch."
Our Gang comedy,
"joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor In
"The Gorgeous
_Hussy."_
Jeanette MacDonald ;
and Clark Gable
In
"San Francisco.** '
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"Gorgeous Hussy."
Cartoon. News.
Jean Hersholt in
"Sins of Man.”
Walter Huston in
"Rhodes."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Hussy.’’
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Hussy."_
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in
"The Gorgeous
Hussy."
Mary Ellis and
Walter Pidgion in
"Fatal Lady.”
_Comedy._
Warner Gland In
•‘Charlie Chan at the
Race Track.”
Cartoon. Cabin Kids.
Jed Prouty In
"Educating Father."
George Raft In
"It Had to Happen."
Francis Lederer and
Ann Sothern in
"My American Wife.”
“March of Time."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in "The
Gorgeous Hussy.”
Cartoon.
Chester Morris
In
•’They Met in •
Tg«l.”
'The Constant
Nyn\ph."
Gertrude Michael in
“Return of Sonhie
Lang.”
Cart. Novelty. News.
Bing Crosby and
Prances Farmer in
’’Rhythm on the
Range." Novelties.
William Powell and
Myrna Loy
in
"The Great Zlegfeld."
Onslow Stevens in
"Easy Money.”
Anne Shirley in
"M'Llss."
Jane Withers and
Irvin S. Cobb In
"Pepper.”
Cart. Novelty. News.
Stuart Erwin and
Florence Rice in
•'Women Are
"Trouble."
Warren William and
Claire Dodd In
"Cue of the Velvet
Claws." Com. Cart.
Anne Shirley In
"M’Lisa.”
Also “O’Shaugh
nesay’s Boy."
Joe E. Brown In
•’Earthworm Trac
tors."
News. Comedy.
John Boles and
Rosalind Russell
"Craig's” Wife."
Fredric March and
Olivia de Havtlland In
“Anthony Adverse."
6 and 8:30 P.m. _
Warner Oland. "Chan
at the Race Track."
Also “Three Cheers
for Love."_
William Powell and
Myrna Loy
in
“The Great Zlegfeld."
Kay Francis and
George Brent In
“Give Me Your
Heart.”
in
"Anthony Adverse."
k'
• rhursday
" John Arledge In
"Two in Revolt.'"
Madeleine Carroll In
"Secret Agent."
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Astaire in
"8wlngtime.”
"March of Time.
Warner Baxter.
Fredric March and
June Lang in
"Road to Glory."
Return engagement.
Will Rogers in
"State Fair."
Cart. Novelty. News.
"Three Cheers for
Love"
and
"High Tension "_
Warner Baxter.
Fredric March and
June Lang in
"Road to Glory.'*
Bette Davis and
Warren William in
"Satan Met a
Lady."
Francis Lederer and:
[da Lupino in “One
Rainy Afternoon.”
Cart. Novelty. News.
Jessie Matthews in
"It's Love Again."
Edmund Lowe. "Gar
den Murder Case."
Francis Lederer and
Ann Sothern In
"My American
_Wife."
Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers in
"Swingtime."
News.
Warner Baxter.
Fredric March and
June Lang in
"The Road to Glory.”
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor in "The
Gorgeous Hussy.” i
News. Comedy._
Fredric March and
Dll via de Havilland in
■•Anthony Adverse."
fiM 5 and 8:45 p.m.
Humphrey Bogart and
Beverley Roberts In
'Two Against World.”
Cart. Novelty. News.
Janet Gaynor and
Will Rogers
in
"State Fair."_
Randolph Scott and
Heather Angel In
"The Last of the Mo
hicans." Cartoon.
Chester Morris
In
"They Met in a
Taxi."
Lew Ayers
in
•"All Quiet on the
Western Front."
Jar.e Withers and
Irvin 8. Cobb in
"Pepper."
Cart. Novelty. News.
George Raft and Do
lores Costello Barry
more In "Yours for
the Asking." Comedy.
Kay Francis and
George Brent in
“Oive Me Your Heart.”
"March of Time."
Ricardo Cortez in
"Postal Inspector.”
John Arledge in
"Two in Revolt."
Jane Withers and
Irvin S. Cobb in
•'Pepper.''
Cart. Novelty. Newa.
June Travis.
Craig Reynolds and
Barton MacLane in
"Jallbreak."
Robert Montgomery
and Madge Evans in
"Piccadilly Jim.”
Short subjects. Cart.
Warner Baxter in
“To Mary With Love.”
John Arledge in
“Two In Revolt."
Bette Davis in
“Dangerous.”
Also 'Champasnt
Charlie."
t_Oary Cooper and
Madeleine Carroll in
“The General Died
_at Dawn."_
Warner Oland and
Helen Wood In
"Charlie Chan at the
Race Track." Com.
Katharine Hepburn
and Fredric March
in
••Mary ot Scotland.”
Kay Francis and
George Brent in
“Oive Me Your Heart."
“March of Time.'*
Kay Francis and
George Brent In
“Give Me Your
Heart."
Roscoe Kama and
Mary Brian in
“Three Married
Men."
Friday
John Arledge In
•’Two in Revolt."
Madeleine Carroll In
"Secret Agent." -
Ginger Rogers and
Fred Aataire In
“Swlnttlme." _
"March of Time.**
Francis Lederer and
Ann Sothern in
"My American
_Wife."
"Return engagement.
Will Rogers In
"State Fair."
Cart. Novelty. News.
Buck Jones in _
"Forbidden Trail.
Also "Pride of the
Marines.''_
Warner Baxter.
Fredric March and
June Lang in
"Road to Glory."
George Raft and Do
lores Costello Barry
more In "Yours lor
the Asking." _
Randolph Scott and
Prances Drake In
"And Sudden Death."
Cart. Novelty. News.
Jessie Matthews In
“It's Love Again."
Edmund Lowe. “Gar
den Murder Case."
Roscoe Kama and
Mary Brian In
"Three Married
_Men."
Fred Astaire and
Ginger Rogers In
"Swingtlme."
News.
Warner Baxter.
Fredric March and
June Lana in
"The Road to Glory."
Joan Crawford and
Robert Taylor irt "The
Gorgeous Hussy."
News. Comedy.
Fredric March and
Olivia de Havtlland in
"Anthony Adverse.”
0:15 and 8:45 p.m.
Merle Oberon. Joel Me
Crea. "These Three.1
Randolph Scott in
“And Sudden Death.'
Janet Gaynor and
Will Rogers
in
"State Fair."_
Randolph Scott and
Heather Angel in
“The Last ol the Mo
hlcans." New serial
Buck Jones in _
"For the Service.”

— Lew Ayers
In
“All Quiet on the
Western Front."
Jane Withers and
Irvin S. Cobb In
"Pepper."
Cart. Novelty. News
Will Rogers and
Janet Gaynor In
"State Fair."
Comedy. Cartoon.
Kay Francis and
George Brent in
"Give Me Your Heart.1
"March of Time."
Ricardo Cortex in
"Postal Inspector."
John Arledge In
"Two In Revolt."
Dick Powell and
Joan Blondell in
"Stage Struck."
Cartoon. Newa.
Tim McCoy
in
“Border* Caballero.'
Mlckef Mouse.
Robert Montgomery
and Madge Evans In
"Piccadilly Jim.”
Short subjects. Cart
l Warner Baxter in
"To Mary With Love.'
John Arledge in
“Two In Revolt."
Errol Plynn In
"Captain Blood.”
News.
Mickey Mouse. .
Gary Cooper and
Madeleine Carroll in
•The General Died
_at Dawn.**_
Warner Oland and
Helen Wood In
"Charlie Chan at th
Race Track. Serial
Katharine HeDburr
and Fredric March
In
"Mary of Scotland."
”~Kay Francis and
George Brent In
"Give Me Your Heart.'
“March of Time.'
Gary Cooper and
Madeleine Carroll ii
"The General Died
at Dawn."
Francis Lederer and
Ann ^bthern
"My ^merican Wilt.1
Saturday
Loretta Young in ~
"Unguarded Hour."
Rex Lease in "Cyclone
ot the Saddle."
Wallace Berry in
"Old Hutch.’’
"King of the Royal
Mounted."
"Star for a Night. *
i Popeye. _
Ross Alexander In
"Hot Money."
William Boyd in
"Heart of the West.**
Richard Arlen in
"Mine With the Iron
Door." Also
"36 Hours to Kill.**
Warner Oland
in
“Charlie Chan at the
Race Tract.’’
, "Walking on Air."
! "Killer at Large"
and
I Popeye.
Dick Foran in
"Trailing the West."
Virginia Weidler ill
"Girl of the Ozarks."
George O'Brien, "Bor
der Patrolman." Mar
garet Lindsay. "Pub
lic Enemy's Wife."
William Powell and
Myrna Lor
In
’The Great Ziegfeld."
Jane Withers and
Irvin Cobb in
"Pepper.”
Comedy. News.
May Robson.
Sybil Jason and
Guy Kibbee in
"Captain's Kid." _
Ken Maynard in "The
Fugitive Sheriff.”
No. 6 of “Custer's
Last Stand." Com.
Brian Donlevy and
Olenda Parrel In
"High Tension."
Comedy. Krazy Kat.
Merle Obtron. Joel Mc
,Crea. “These Three."
| Randolph Scott In
I "And Sudden Death. *
"Pepper.”
"Thirty-six Hours
to Kill.”
Popeye.
Claire Trevor In
"Star for a Night."
Barton MacLane la
"Bengal Tiger."
Jack Holt
in
"End of the
Trail."
Lew Ayers
In
"All Quiet on the
Western Front"_
State. 3"to p.m..
kiddie amateur show.
"Murder By an Aristo
crat/ '^SecretPatrol/;
Will Roters and
Janet Gaynor in
"State Fair."
Comedy. Cart, Serial.
Wallace Beery la
"Old Hutch."
Robert Taylor In
"Murder In the Fleet."
Hoot Gibson In "The
Riding Avenger."
Dick Powell and
Joan Blondell In
"Stage Struck."
Cartoon News.
Bing Crosby. * Bob
Burns and Frances
1 Farmer In "Rhythm
. on the Range."_
Jane Withers. Irvin
8. Cobb, In "Pepper.”
Also "Florida Special."
■ See. MaJ- Bowes' Am.
Jean Harlow. Spencer
’ Tracy, in “Riff Raff.”
Hoot Olbson In
. ‘'Frontier Justice."
Errol Flynn In
"Captain Blood."
News.
Mickey Mouse._
Gary Cooper and
Madeleine Carroll in
“The General Died
at Dawn.”
Brian Donlevy In
"3H Hours to KU1."
> Also "Three Cheers
. for Love." Serial.
Jack London's
“White Fang."
Randolph Scott In
"And Sudden Death."
Warner Baxter end
Fredrlc March In
’ "The Road to
_ Glory.”
Randolph Scott
"The Last of the
Mohicans."
Warner Oland. "Char
lie Chan at the Race
Track." No. 4 of
"Phantom Rider."
A
MINNEAPOLIS* PIONEER WOMEN I
Spirit of Their Progenitors Still Lives in Those of Northwest I
Metropolis Despite Its Vast Cultural Progress. 9
Feminine Activities Are Numerous. 9
By Mathilde Bahar.
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn.
Minneapolis women stand
shoulder to shoulder with
their men in building up this
pulsating metropolis of the
Northwest. But they have not per
mitted themselves to be pressed into
the common mold regulated by city
life, the movies and the radio. The
women have kept themselves and
their families fairly close to the old
customs and traditions of their pi
oneer ancestry and it has given the
city a charming flavor and a distinct
' pattern.
j This probably accounts for the fact
-1
that the American standard of lean
berouged feminine beauty finds little
favor here. Even the young girls are
not contented with a toasted sandwich j
and a drink to ease the noonday
hunger while keeping off the pounds.
No indeed. One goes into a res- j
taurant and sees them eating such!
dishes as spare-ribs and sauerkraut, j
or huge portions of steaming knack
wurst and richly buttered mashed
potatoes.
*‘We need the good substantial
food" laughingly challenged a chubby I
blue-eyed maiden who was enjoying a
hearty luncheon. “It is too cold here
for dainty salads like you eat in the
East. Besides our men like women
who are more than just bones.”
Watch them walk gayly along Nic
ollet avenue, the Fifth avenue of the
Northwest, husky, with lovely high
country color and a spring in their
step. They are not clothed in tawdry
last-minute fashions. To many this
may appear to be because the drought
as kept hard times here. However, a
more careful scrutiny will reveal that
madame prefers something good in a 1
coat or dress so it will last a long ;
time. Because of this Minneapolis is
among the few remaining cities where
women buy quantities of yard goods
to sew themselves or must have their
clothes made to order. According to
the ladies ready-to-wear is not so
popular since good clothes are difficult j
to buy at reasonable prices in .the
larger sizes.
Nevertheless Minneapolis has first
class department stores and a good
specialty shop district. But the pres
ident of one insisted that if he were
dependent upon the Minneapolis wom
en only for custom, he would have
gone out of business long ago. It is
the women of the surrounding States
who come into the largest city of the
Northwest to do their buying from
whom he draws the largest trade.
'T'HE longer one remains here the
more One feels that the strongest
underlying influence in Minneapolis life
is Scandinavian with its attendant
Lutheranism: this in spite of the fact
that many women have carefully ex
plained to me the city is supposedly
dominated socially and financially by
the old New England families who
first settled here. And certainly few
Scandinavians are found amid the
ostentatious Victorian dwellings that
crown Lowry Hill, or in the houses
which skirt the three lakes of the
silk stocking district. Yet madame !
from New England is forced to admit
that while the Scans (as they are
called here) were brought in from the
old country to build the railroad and
settle the land, today it is the in
fluence of the latter which permeates
the city.
Take sports, for instance. They
form & part of the daily city life.
Skiing, tobogganing, skating—young
and old of both sexes enjoy them.
And in spite of the fact that the city
has won world renown from its loca
tion along the deep gorge of the
Mississippi River and there are 11
large lakes inside the city limits, even
the school playgrounds are flooded in
the Winter so the little children can
skate under supervision of the teach
ers. In the Summer there Is boating,
swimming and other out-of-door
sports for rich and poor alike in the
143 parks within the city limits.
While the “Scan” mother has
Americanized quickly at the same
time, there is a certain racial Integ
rity in her nature which makes her
cling to many of the old customs.
Take the Norwegian women. They
were always a fish-eating people and
even here do not care for meat and
vegetables. And today in Minneapo
lis with all the propaganda on child
feeding, you often find mothers rear
ing the tow-headed chubby young
sters primarily on fish. All “Scans”
are great coffee drinkers and even
in the poorest family there must al
ways be good heavy cream for the
coffee. It is a question of losing face,
for among the Scandinavian ladies
conformity plays a strong part in her
life. A mother feels her husband is
not doing his duty if they do not
own their own little detached house
and live close to their friends.
VVfHILE she insists on having her
’’ home modern in every way in
side and out, yet she wants her chil
dren to remember the “old ways.”
On Christmas eve ■ there is not a
“Scan” in Minneapolis who is not
serving steaming ludeflsh (dried cod
fish), rich cookies and wine to her
guests. However, the Swede will serve
it with a rich cream sauce, while the
L
'Jorvegians use drawn butter. And
he stranger must quickly learn while
nere not to mix up their nationalities,
rhese people have brought with them
ill the antagonisms of the mother
country, but toward the Americans
;hey stand united as “Scans.”
In discussing the problems of family
life a prominent social worker ex
plained: “The Minneapolis woman of
Scandinavian extraction holds a very
important place in this community.
She is a first-rate person who cornea
from generations of women accus
tomed to take their place in a com
munity. Even in the old country they
are civic leaders and have their clubs
and lodges. Besides she is an excel
lent housekeeper and good cook who
regards her home and her children
as a serious job. While sometimes
we are likely to feel that the women
are a little heavy and serious, yet get
them in a crowd and they have the
best times laughing and playing all
sorts of games. They particularly love
the old folk dancing, accompanied by
the accordion.”
Minneapolis women, irrespective of
race or creed, have as their first in
terest the welfare and education of
their children. As a result, one finds
here the finest schools in the country
offering their young people all sorts
of education facilities, together with
the best equipment in buildings, play
grounds and athletic fields that money
can buy. On the banks of the Mis
sissippi, within the city limits, is the
University of Minnesota, whose 550
acres of campus is the dream of every
mother for her young. She expects
her child to go to college. And she
also expects the university to partici
pate in the civic life of the city, for
to Minneapolitans the educational,
civic and family life are all bound
together. Professors and their wives
are to help form popular thought,
to be community leaders and serve
the city.
A CADEMIC isolation Is unheard
of,” explained a great educator.
“That Is probably why we have such
numbers of women entering the pro
fessions. They feel they can con
tribute so much to civic life.”
And the housewife feels the same
way. “Where our husband and our
city are involved, we must take things
seriously,” says she. "Before the de
pression we preferred a bridge party,
but today a political meeting or an
educational forum is more important,
for we are going through a number
of changes in Minneapolis.” And a
proof of the sincerity of this atti
tude can be seen in the crowds at
tending any of the six forums held
weekly in the various districts for
the purpose of bringing to the adult
current problems for discussion.
The Minneapolis women are accus
tomed to participating in public life.
Here she picks her side and sticks to
it, for little time is wasted in being
fashionably liberal or parlor pink.
If you go among many young pro
fessional women, workingmen's wives,
farmers and small business people,
the women whisper about the tyranny
of the Citizens’ Allinace, the great
bugaboo of the farm-labor class. On
the other hand, the wives of the
powers-that-be talk of the need for
the open shop If Minneapolis is to
survive through competition, and are
likely to discuss the attempts of in
timidation by labor, outside fomenta
tion and all the rest of the problems
which weigh so heavily upon their
men.
The women explain that the very
qualities of stubbornness, persistence
and independence that made possible
the building of the great Northwest
has brought about this deadlock
among Uie people. It is no longer a
political matter, but reaches into the
very heart of soeial life.
A T A recent meeting of one of
Minneapolis’ most active wom
en's organizations the ladles grew
quite heated over a recent article In
a national magazine dealing with
their city.
"While there Is talk about all these
things,” said one, "the majority of our
people want peace and democracy
rather than violence.”
Another explained: "Hard times
had a lot to do with it. You must
not forget that not only have we
migratory labor and unemployment
problems, but that our avenge in
come Is low. Only about IZfiOO
persons in our State have more than
$5,000 a year, and only some 15,000
earn between $3,000 to $5,000 a year. J
Because of this we are bound to haw
great numbers of educated persons
who Insist on being beard.”
I

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