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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 30, 1937, Image 29

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Hollywood Is Indignant
Over Terror Societies
“Black Legion,” at the Earle, Is Effective
. If Not Pretty Drama—Harry
Reser Tops Stage Bill.
BY JAY CARMODY.
IT IS not the usual way of Hollywood to become indignant Yet because it
does just that in "The Black Legion," the film which opened yesterday at
the Earle, it achieves an effect sufficiently different to make audiences
sit up and take more than average notice.
The particular thing about which Hollywood is Indignant is implied in
the title of the film, namely, secret terroristic societies. By showing the
manner in which such groups operate,*;
Warner Bros, contrive to preach as
powerful a sermon as you are likely
to hear in months of film-going.
“The Black Legion,” of course, is
more than a sermon. It is a very
dramatic piece of photography pecu
liarly designed to make the spectator
painfully aware that all is not perfect
In this best-of-all-possible worlds.
A foreword tells the audiences of
“The Black Legion” that the whole
thing Is entirely fictitious. You can
believe that If you want to, but if you
remember what the newspapers were
saying not so long ago about goings-on
in Michigan and other spots in the
Midwest you will find a striking par
allel between those reports and what
happens In the Warner Bros.’ latest
production. One would swear, in the
vague way that such things are
remembered, that the reporters who
wrote those stories wrote the script of
•‘The Black Legion.” The connection
Is at least that close.
* * * *
T-IUMAN nature Is mirrored merci
A lessly in this picture. It is shown
as full of deficiencies which permit
otherwise decent individuals to be
lured within the odious orbit of ter
roristic groups and to be kept there
by a craven fear after they have
become aware of the original error In
Joining. The implications of "The
Black Legion” are that the human
species is base, stupid and cruel and
Its eloquence is such that the spectator
comes away feeling that It Is not far
from correct.
Briefly, its story is that of a factory
worker who feels that he has been
treated unjustly when a bright
co-worker, bom of alien parents, Is
promoted to the foremanship to which
the former aspired. At first, he is nat
urally and normally disappointed.
Disappointment, however, turns to
vengefulness when he hears the appeal
of an alien baiter who sees an oppor
tunity grow rich through organizing
100-per-cent Americans. The disap
pointed 100-per-center joins up and
becomes the unhappy, but terrified,
tool of the society in a series of burn
ings, floggings, and finally a murder
of his best friend.
As an expose of the methods of
such groups, the film Is one of the
most remorseless things that Holly
wood has contrived. In its unpleasant
ness, however, it achieves a fascina
tion that many a film built around a
more pleasant subject could never hope
to achieve.
One of the excellent reasons for
this circumstance is Humphrey Bo
gart. If you don’t recognize the name,
he is the chap who played Duke
Mantee in “The Petrified Forest.” In
his latest film Bogart gives a per
formance in nowise inferior to that
which enabled him almost to steal
his first picture from Leslie Howard.
Others in the cast who give excellent
performances are Erin O'Brien-Moore
as the wife of Bogart, Helen Flint
as a lady of darkness and Samuel
Hinds as the judge. As the agent of
the intelligent society, Mr. Hinds
speaks a piece at the end of the film
which is one of the few things in it
designed to send the audience home
feeling it cannot be so bad, after all.
"The Black Legion” is not a pretty
film. Indeed, it is quite the reverse.
But it makes effective drama just the
same.
* * * a
Tyf USIC is the dominant note of the
Earle's stage show. It would have
to be with Harry Reser and his radio
orchestra providing the headline act.
Mr. Reser and his boys have been
around a long time now, filling
theaters and the ether with melody.
They have remained so long because
they know just what kind of music
has the highest ear appeal. Particu
larly is this true of Reser himself.
If there is such a thing as a banjo
virtuoso, Reser must be it. Yesterday
afternoon’s audience obviously felt
that way about it, and succeeding ones
will be no different.
Paul Gerrits, Vic and Lamar and
the Keene twins constitute three other
acts which with the feature and Reser
add up to a bill that would not need
a two-reel “Popeye" to be good. The
two-reeler, however, is thrown in for
extra measure, and It's very fine
"Popeye.”
New Film
At Capitol
Has Drama
“Beloved Enemy” Is
Treated With
Sympathy.
THERE is ever drama in the con
flict between devotion to a
woman and devotion to duty.
The new motion picture at the
Capitol, Samuel Goldwyn's "Beloved
Enemy,” is no exception. It is an
engrossing cinema story, told with both
power and tenderness.
Power and tenderness, of course,
may not be exactly what you would
term sister emotions, but they both
can apply to a motion picture dealing
with romance and the Irish rebellion.
The romance is treated with sympathy
and feeling and the bloody days of
Erin’s troubles certainly provide drama
that is forceful and moving.
This is not another “Informer” Mr.
Goldwyn has built out of those trying
times, but it is a sincere story with
drama aplenty. Even though you know
all the time it is intelligent and
skillful cinema trickery, you can’t help
but become exceedingly interested In
this case of the Irish leader in love
with an English girl and torn between
the cause and his heart.
The story, in this case, benefits
appreciably through the fact it is
performed with considerable integrity
by an accomplished cast. Brian
Aheme is an actor both capable
enough and sensitive enough to create
perfectly the lad with a blaze in
his soul for his Ireland and fire in his
heart for the girl he loved. It is
an intelligently conceived and warmly
alive characterization Aherne has
turned in.
Miss Merle Oberon, the girl in the
case, is another motion picture per
former who has the skill and the
feeling to create a screen character
who seems real. She does so here with
the utmost sympathy. There are
others, too—Colin Clive and Donald
Crisp, particularly—who seem to have
been plucked from the Ireland of the
time instead of from a casting list.
Eleanor Holm (Jarrett) and Art
Jarrett headline the Capitol’s stage
ahow, this time without benefit of
Mr. Jarrett’s orchestra. In all due
credit to the band Art had when he
last was here, it must be said that
Mr. and Mrs. Jarrett get along quite
well without it. They sing pleasantly
(though Mr. Jarrett's voice l* a little
better than his swimming star wife’s),
they clown a bit about that Olympic
business, they seem to be very fond
of one another and yesterday evening
the customers liked them very much.
The rest of the bill is uniformly
enjoyable. There’s some good dancing,
gome straight and some comedy, by
Rosa Wyse, Jr„ and June Mann: there’s
robust humor by Italian Comic Harry
Burns and his cohorts, and the Honey
family start the proceedings off with
their smoothly accomplished difficult
acrobatics. —H .M.
NAMED TO WEST POINT
Two Washingtonians Take Test
March 2 for Army Academy.
Two residents of the District of Co
lumbia have been named by President
jtoosevelt as candidates lor the March
3 entrance examination with a view
to admission to the United States
Military Academy, West Point, July 1.
They are Ernest H. Burt, Jr., 1413
Shepherd street, and Booth Thomas,
3431 Thirty-fourth street. John Ed
ward Gross, Fort Belvolr, Va., also
was announced as a presidential ap
pointee from the United States at
larze.
, javid C. Clagett, Upper Marlboro,
Md., was named as the candidate
fro/n the filth. Maryland district.
a.
“PATIENCE” IS RECEIVED
WITH VIGOROUS ACCLAIM
A FRIDAY night audience which
entirely ignored the fact that
“Patience” is not one of the most
popular of the Gilbert and Sullivan
operas possessed an apparently in
satiable appetite for it at the National
Theater last night. Its applause may
not have been the peak for the two
week engagement of the D'Oyly
Carte company, but it was not far
from that lofty pinnacle.
“Patience” is not the most singable
thing in the repertoire of the com
pany, but apparently its members
never had heard such a thing for they
sang it with the same astonishing zest
that they do the simpler and more
familiar works.
It is satirical, of course, but a satire
that is garbed in such infectious good
humor that it turned out to be one
ef the most amusing of the nine
operas.
One of the happiest things to be
said for “Patience” is that it has
Martyn Green in one of his more
spirited moods. Mr. Green is the
"fleshly poet” of the pl'ce and it is
a part in which he positively revels.
Few actors or singers revel more
appealingly than Mr. Green.
Darrell Fancourt’s bass voice and
basso figure decorate the part of the
colonel, and his song in the first act
was one of the most enthusiastically
reoeived bits of the evening. When
Fancourt finished with the encores,
with the help of the chorus, there were
no possible variations.
Like its predecessors, "Patience” is
beautifully dressed. —J. C.
Keith Film
A Challenge
To Society
IF SOCIETY is not ashamed of
itself after seeing "You Only Live
Once,” then It is precisely the
kind of stupid animal which the
film that opened at Keith’s yesterday
would imply.
The smugness with which the non
criminal class may regard itself comes
off a bad second best in this film, a
dramatic thing which deals with a
young couple driven t- despair, hunger,
robbery, murder and finally death,
when all they wanted in this world
was the right to live and love. Be
cause of a misguided, but never ma
licious childhood, the youth had a
prison past. He wanted to go straight
when the girl and his apparent chance
to do so arrived, but society said "no”
in terms too ugly to be disbelieved.
So, because there was nothing else
to do, the lad went wrong again and
for love of him the girl went also.
The tone of this picture, which
Walter Wanger made with the money
and the blessing ot United Artists, is
a continuous high-pitched snarl. It
is designed to shock complacent citi
zens out of their complacency. If it
fails of that, it nevertheless should
succeed In making most spectators
pause and think. Not all of filmland’s
product can hope to achieve that
much.
Henry Fonda is the youth who is
not allowed to go straight His part
is one In which any good actor would
revel. It gives him a chance to run
the scale of the emotions from tender
love for the girl to savage despair
over the ways of society In general.
If he hits a false note here and there
It is lost in the general excellence of
his performance.
Sylvia Sidney is the girl who be
lieves in Fonda’s “Eddie Taylor."
More than that, she loves him. She
sticks by her faith and her love until
violent death overtakes them both
and she Is convincing al. the way.
There are other meritorious per
formances In this film, notably those
of William Oargan, a prison chaplain;
Bart cm McLane, as a public defender
with a striking perception of right
and wrong, and Jean Dixon, who is
her usually reliable self in the part
of an elder sister. —J. C.
Her Film Returns
SONJA HENIE,
World champion figure skater, makes her initial film appear
ance in the leading role in “One in a Million,” the screen musical
which came to Loew's Columbia yesterday to start its second
week on F street.
De Mille’s ‘The Plainsman’
Tells Epic Frontier Story

Wild Bill9 Hickock’s Career Provides Drama
for His Latest Motion Picture
at the Palace.
BY HARRY MacARTHUR.
CECIL B. DE MILLE hasn’t often missed In the past. He hasn’t missed,
either, in this newest of his motion pictures, “The Plainsman,” which
opened at LoeWa Palace today and which was shown the critics of the
town Wednesday. The story of “Wild Bill” Hlckock is a vigorous and
red-blooded entertainment from beginning to end.
It’s more than just pleasant to see those legendary two-fisted gents who
Mniea westward wun me country si
frontier live again and again do that
fighting which helped stretch the
United States from one ocean to the
other. There’s a thrill in seeing "Wild
BiU,” "Buffalo Bill” Cody, ‘‘Calamity
Jane," Gen. Custer and the others
fight those battles that helped make
the plains safe for the white man.
Even If you are Inclined to agree
that Yellow Hand has a pretty strong
argument when he tells ‘‘Wild BUI"
Hickock that the white man belongs
In the land of the rising sun and it's
his own fault if he gets hurt trying to
take the plains and the buffalo away
from the Indian, it’s still a thrilling
motion picture.
It is fairly well known by this time
that De MUle started out to make a
film based upon the life of ‘‘Buffalo
BUI” Cody and then discovered, as
soon as the scenario got under way,
that this “Wild BiU” Hickock was
even better . “copy” than his better
known pal. So ‘‘The Plainsman”
turned Into a colorful film story about
a colorful citizen—a chap who could
draw a pair of six-shooters quicker
than a censor can snip a kiss.
* * * *
TT HAS Ufe and fire and vigor, but
A it's more than just an exciting yam
of the old West. Much more. Basi
cally, It's the recounting of Hickock’s
battles with the Indians, his shooting
of a trio of soldiers (before they shot
him, and not just for fun), his
"arrest” by "Buffalo Bill,” his final
capture of the gang selUng firearms
to the Indians, his love for “Calamity
f
Jane" and his final Ignominious death
with a bullet in his back. But the
De Mille touch makes It bigger than
the story of one man.
De Mille, for one thing, knows how
to handle masses of people In a man
ner no one else In Hollywood seems
to know. There’s one particular
sequence—the ambushing of an am
munition train by a horde of Indians
1 and the resultant battle, led by Hickock
and Cody—that's as brutal and thrill
ing a piece of warfare as was that
storming of Acre in ‘‘The Crusades.’*
* * * *
rJ'HE entire cast, from the stars
down to the Indians (who are
mighty Indianish looking Indians, in
cidentally), performs ‘‘The Plains
man” with a high degree of skill and
a simulation of reality that Is some
thing near to flawless. Gary Cooper,
as "Wild Bill” Hickock, has a role
to which he is admirably suited If the
descriptions of Hickock are anything
like accurate. Lean, gangling, soft
spoken and hard-fisted he is supposed
to have been, and that’s the sort of
a fellow Cooper makes him—not a
"bad man” but a patriot ready to
do battle at the drop of a hand
toward a holster. Cooper has done
a fine job.
Jean Arthur, tou, has turned in a
fine performance and has created
what will pass for a true-to-life
"Calamity Jane.’’ Her characteriza
tion of the hard-boiled lass who wore
leather pants but had a soft heart
just the same is a consistent one which
matches Cooper’s for authenticity.
The rest of the players—particularly
Charles Bickford, John Miljan, Victor
Varconi, James Ellison and Porter
Hall—contribute characters as real as
the story in which they appear.
CAPT. SHARP TO RETURN
Will Eeaaeume Post an Director !
of Navy Officer Personnel.
Navy Department officials an
nounced yesterday that Capt. Alex
ander Sharp has returned to Wash
ington to assume his duties as direc
tor of officer personnel.
Capt. Sharp was recently discharged
from treatment at Fitzsimmons Gen
eral Hospital at Denver. Colo. He
will be on duty here in the Bureau of
Navigation at the department. He
has made his home here at 1545
Thirty-fifth street.
Additional Amusements Page C-16
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STACK /
IN PIRSON
ELEANOR HOLM^f
v ART JARRETT
VNE IN if MILLION I
Vj SONJAHfNIf AOOLPHS MENJOU^
ITBSTsE^nTBEw?!
Leave your ear with the “Bed Cap” I
attendant!—Poole’s Aoto Service. [
CAYETY BLRLESK
ALL THIS WEEK
“HINDA WASSAL”
COMING SUNDAY
“BOZO SNYDER”
THE ^MAX ^WHO ^NEVER ^ SPEAKS^
CtMtltutiow Hall. Sun. Aft., Fab. 7, 4 P. M.
ITURBI
Calabratsd Saanlth Plaalit— la Recital.
gwti SI.10. SI.65. S2 10. Mrs. Dority i, HOP 8
Ceaftitirtl.a Hall. Tuts. Eva.. Feb. 16. 1:50
n lAOTin**’"""’ M,tra* °6*ra Aim.
I LnUtf inW an, Dtruy'i, 1300 6 »t.
dancing!
The Jack Rollins Studios
“Smart Dancing''
BALL BOOM STAGE
1611 Conn. Ave.Pec. 5770 *
PEGGY KELLY SCHOOL
OF THE DANCE
Beginner . . . Intermediate . . .
Advanced Classes for Children and
Adults
Ballet, Tap. Modern Technique
Acrobatic—Professional and Ad
vanced Tap classes Scientific ex
ercises I or body-building and re
ducing under supervision Miss
Kelly.
Students registering now will
be. presented in Spring Revue
Studio. 101* IRth St. N.W.
Phone STerlinr 9***
I -■
ACADEMY °f Per&,‘ W ft'00"1
E. Lawrence Phillips' Theatre feautlful
Continuous Prom 1:00 P.M.
"WOMEN ARE TROUBLE." with STUART
ERWIN and PAUL KELLY. SANTA
FE BOUND.” with TOM TYLER and
JEANNE MARTEL.
A CliTAN CLARENDON. VA.
AdfllUn ELEANOR WHITNEY and
TOM BROWN In "ROSE BOWL."
PA DAI IN A 11U> and N. C. Are. S.E.
LAKULINA Yellowstone" and
"BACK TO NATURE."
PIDPI r 210.1 Penna. Are. N.W.
LIKLLE. Free Parkins. 2090 K St.
STAN LAUREL snd OLIVER HARDY in
“OUR RELATIONS." Musical. News.
nilMDADTAN >343 Wisconsin Are.
UUIYlcAKlUN robs aiexandfr
and ANNE NAGEL In "HERE COMES
CARTER.” Chapter No. 3. "Darkest
Africa." Also Comedy.
CA1DI AWN ANACOSTIA. D. C.
rAIKLAWN victor mclaglen m
“THE MAGNIFICENT BRUTE "
I ITTI V 9th Between F and O
Ul ILC Acoustlcon Equipped.
LAST TIME
FREDRIC MARCH and CHARLES
LAUGHTON in
“LES MISERABLES.”
Tomorrow—"STRANGE INTERLUDE.**_
DDINfTCC liio H st. n.e.
rKINLE.99 Double Feature
MARY CARLISLE In “LADY. BE CARE
FUL." BOB LIVINGSTON in "THE
THREE MESQUITSERS "_
crrn «?« Georrla Are.
9LLU Silrer Sorinc. Md.
Matiner 1:00 p.M.
“THE BIG GAME,”
ALL-AMERICAN FOOTBALL STARS.
“CALIFORNIA MAIL,”
DICK FORAN.
_ Chapter No. 1. "Phantom Rider."
CTANTDN r,th »nd c st*. n.e.
9 1 API 1 UN Finest Sound Equipment.
Continuous From 1 :nn P.M
JEAN HARLOW FRANCHOT TONE and
GARY GRANT in "SUZY." HOOT GIB
8QN In "FEUD OF THE WEST."
STATE-BETHESDA Betheada. Ad."
FRANK McHUGH and
JOAN BLONDELL in
‘THREE MEN ON A HORSE.’
Cartoon and News Events.
FALLS CHURCH. VA.
CTATC NO PARKING I EC
9IAIL worries LEX
I .nGdLLEEATOADCAYRTn
MULLER In "TAR- I "WANTED_
ZAN ESCAPES." I JANE TURNER."
TAKOMA ‘•nVpMVW,,,^
Continuous From 1:00 P.M.
STUART ERWIN in
“ALL-AMERICAN CHUMP.”
PAUL KELLY in
“ACCUSING FINGER.”
WILSON °*%rt2aaSm. VaJ,***'
GLENDA FARRELL in „
“SMART BLOND.”
JESSE THEATER
Double Feature
"CASE OF THE BLACK CAT” wit*,
RICARDO CORTEZ. JUNE TRAVI3.
t/i "WILD BRIAN KENT.” RALPH
BELLAMY and MAE CLARK
QC Serial. Cartoon. Mat. at 1:00 P.M.
U —
SCVI VAN 1** R- ■ Are. N.W.
__ 91LVAN Double Feature
3 “THE CAPTAIN’8 KID.” 8YBIL
B JASON. GUY KIBBEE. “15MAID
EN LANE.* CLAIRE TREVOR and
as CESAR ROMERO. Serial. Car
gg toon. Matinee at 1:0(t P.M._
PALM THEATER DEMAi
“POLO JOE,”
JOE E. BROWN.
Comedy. Cartoon. "Darkest Africa.
Now Atrial, jfattaat at 1.00 ML
■ National
B IV Last Tw« Performance*
W. Mat. t:15, Ere. t:]5
B D’OYLY CARTE GILBERT «
|ll§ Opera Company SULLIVAN
B •« ^ndon_OPERAS
IHI TODAY MAT. an« NIGHT
H| “THE GONDOLIERS”
81 Ob* MOM. AT CtIGMalf. We4.
jiSf week ,nu", ,u * gat.
GUTHRIE MeCLI.NTIC Preienta
I JOHN GIELGUD
-j JUDITH ANDERSON
i| In William Shakespearo'a
| HAMLET
gg with
$ ARTHUR BYRON
ft LILLIAN GISH
H Seat, now arailabie at tbe bos
S office for all performance*. *
" VPfTU'C JSthl
xrnw i *xJLi in 9 oig
!llU a waampOTon laarirerioa
U SYLVIA HEN»Y J
I SIDRE9 * FORDR
l“Y0U ONLY LIVE ONCE”,
™ AND A NEW EDITION . f
I “The MARCH of TIMET1
.. JAMES CAGNEY la
jl_. G»EATGUY" " >
RIALTO
LAST TIMES TODAY
gvftf'l
like IT V
ci v • panl Muni in
f \f'F ** Alio-"Fi^Ida and ^^B
SklpvVorth in "TILLIE AND |
(11S.M
Extra—Ohio Valley Flood Pictures
DOORS OPEN 10:15
5 SHOWS TOUT—DOORS OPEN IJI
\ The Picture That Dares Reveal All
\ “BLACK LEGION”
A Wanur Bret Pithirs
\ -OW STAGE
-A HARRY RESER
\ \ CLIQUOT CLUB ESKIMOS i
Lnwi" C* Also ll Sam
^^^yTia>TW,ltat,tTg.AtHiAataga*r
* \m\ attnctw-KAT FUAtS a "Altai Mda”
Extra—Ohio Valley Flood Pictures
m--.. ' .—"***T~",7’
WUI'lildilllWBP
mvusiw *\
ia Csuiqmt Brthsk l.
THE WOMEN ALONE V
* •* Oscar Homoka \
• Aim Stltci Sfciwtr” ^m**0**
MAT. tSc-EVS. t»c a 40c
P' HILADELPHIA
ORCHESTRA
RUGENE ORMAVDT Sod
VISCOUNT KONOTE CondsetlnS
FEB. 2—8:45
PIATIGORSKY, Cellist
Tickets Si to S3 .*5. T. Arthsr Smith
910 G St. in WITT-HAMILL MUSIC CO.
2
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AMBASSADOR Jt8d,h &.MB&
WARNER OLAND 1n “CHARLIE
CHAN AT THE OPERA." "Ac*
Drummond." No 4. March of Time,
APOLLO Ph«ne*LinV
Doors Ooen 12:30 P.M.
Show Starts 1 OO P.M.
EDMUND LOWE in GIRL ON THE
FRONT PAGE." and WARNER
BAXTER and JUNE LANG in
"WHITE HUNTER."_
AVALON 06,3 &T-&S
Doors Open 12:30 P.M.
Show Starts 1:00 P.M.
JANE WITHERS in “CAN THIS BE
DIXIE? *'Ace Drummond." No. 4.
AVENUE GRAND
Doors Open 12:30 P.M.
Show Starts 1:00 P.M.
JAMES DUNN in 'MYSTERIOUS
CROSSING." and PATSY KELLY
In "PIGSKIN PARADE."_
PCNTRAI 42,-. Ninth St. N.W.
LCnlflAL Phone Met. 2R41
WILLIAM POWELL and MYRNA LOY
In "AFTER THE THIN MAN."
COLONY 4885<gt £»,Mfc
Doors Open 12:30 P.M.
Show Starts 100 P M.
JOE E. BROWN in "POLO JOE " with
CAROI, HUGHES and RICHARD
"SHEETS?” GALLAGHER. "Give
Me Liberty." Technicolor Short
Subject. ___
unup 1330 c st. N.r.
nUIT) t Phone Line. 1IUM
Doors Open 12:30 P.M.
Show Starts 1:00 P.M.
ANN SOTHERN and GENE RAY
MOND tn "SMARTEST GIRL IN
TOWN” and JOHN WAYNE In
"CONFLICT.” Mickey Mouse.
PENN 6,0 8 *
Doors Open 12:30 P H.
Show Starts 1:00 PM.
MARTHA RAYE in “HIDEAWAY
GIR L " ___
C A VOV 3030 11th St. N.W.
unYUI Phone Col. 406S
Doors Onen 12:30 P.M.
Show Starts 1 :00 P.M.
‘THREE MEN ON A HORSE." with
FRANK MCHUGH and JOAN
BLOND ELI._8 i llv Symphony._
SHERIDAN CR‘,
Matinee. 1:00 P.M.
LAUREL and HARDY In "OUR RE
LATIONS." Popeye.
TlVni I l4,‘ 84 * Park Bd 1N.wl
I1VUL.I Phone Col. 1000
Doors Open 12:30 P.M.
__Show Starts 1:00 P.M.
MARTHA RAYE In "HIDEAWAY
UPTOWN Newark^SL PL ML
Cleveland 5400
flTTBM Matinee. 1:00 P.M.
LAUREL and HARDY in "OUR RE.
LAtxONB._
YORK Ga. Are. and Qoebee "
IUIWV Place N.W. Col. 401d
Doora Open 12:30 P.M.
__Show Starts 1:00 P.M.
BPRT WHEELER and ROBERT
WOOLSEY in "MUMMY'S? BOYS.'
'Ace Drummond," No. 1.
HIPPODROME Bur Doubl»”show
Continuous 2: no to 11:00 PM
Gable and MacDonald in
“SAN FRANCISCO.”
Also James Dunn in ‘Two-Fisted
Gentleman.”
. Tomorrow—2 Days
Edward Arnold. “Come and Get It."
fAMFft MT rainier. md7~"
^ : „V, Double Feature
Ralph Bellamy, •wild Brian Kent."
Jed Prouty In “Back to Nature."
_ Tomorrow—M Davs
Eleanor Powell in "Born to Dance."
Note: New Starting Time. 1-11 Pit,
A RP A nr hyattsville md.
« v Double Feature
Robert Kent. Ttlng of Royal Mounted.*
Charles Starrett. ‘Alone Came Love.*
. Tomorrow—•> Days
Laurel and Hardy. “Our Relations."
Note: New Starting Time. 1-11 P.M.
RICHMOND *To<HiyA’
Gcorve Brent In “God's Country
and the Woman."_
MU ft ROCKVILLE. MD.
mILU Double Feature
Continuous 2:00 to 11:00 P M.
Dick Koran In ''California Mah."
Paul Kelly In “Accusing Finger."
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111 tion or money back.
PHONE
POTOMAC 0040
Hitchcock
Suspense in
Met’s Film
“The Woman Alone”
Is Dramatic and
Gripping.
IF YOU'D like to help yourself to
a man-sized portion of Jitters,
chills and shakes, just take a look
at this Alfred Hitchcock-directed
“The Woman Alone,” now playing at
the Metropolitan.
When Oscar Homolka sends his
young brother-in-law traipsing across
London innocently lugging a parcel
every one in the audience knows is
going to blow sky high at 1:45 p.m.,
there’s not many an onlooker who can
remain calm and collected. The
youngster stops for all the things a
youngster is bound to stop for, takes
his time, and you find yourself hold
ing your breath and making quick
glances at the clock beside the Met's
screen, as if it could tell you how
much time *the lad has.
"The Woman Alone” probably would
just be routine melodrama in other
hands, but not in Mr. Hitchcock’s. He
is a citizen who knows how to create
suspense. He can take a grlpplngly
dramatic situation right up to the
breaking point and he knows when to
stop. He builds his suspense all the
way to the peak and never lets it slip
beyond into the utter melodrama that
brings laughter in the place of keen
interest. That is the talent which
makes this picture something the
thriller fans shouldn’t miss.
This tale of a man engaged in a
little quiet sabotage intended to ter
rify all Londoners, while his wife re
mains innocent until she kills him
and marries a handsome lad from
Scotland Yard, proves, too, that the
Britons can make high-speed films.
The swift action, as well as the dra
matic suspense, is another trade mark
of the fine Italian hand-of Mr. Alfred
Hitchcock.
In addition to Mr. Homolka’s con
sistently sinister performance, “The
Woman Alone,” 1s helped along its
path by Sylvia Sidney, John Loder
(the chap from the Yard) and Des
mond Tester, the lad who totes the
bomb. —H. M.
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time ol Showing.
National—“The Gondoliers,” at 2:15
and 8:15 p.m.
Capitol—“Beloved Enemy,” at 11
a.m., 1:40, 4:25, 7:05 and 9:50 p.m.
Stage shows at 12:50, 3:30, 6:15 and
9 p.m.
Earle—“Black Legion.” 10:45 a.m.,
1:30, 4:15, 7:15 and 10 p.m. Stage
shows at 12:35, 3:25, 6:20 and 9:10
p.m.
Keith’s—“You Only Live Once,” at
11:36 a.m., 1:39, 3:42, 5:45, 7:48 and
9:51 p.m. “March of Time,” at 11:15
a.m., 1:18, 3:21, o:24, 7:27 and 9:30
p.m.
Palace—"The Plainsman/’ at 12:10,
2:35, 4:55, 7:15 and 9:35 p.m.
Columbia—“One in a Million,” at
11 a.m., 1:10, 3:20, 5:30, 7:40 and
9:45 p.m. •
Metropolitan—“The Woman Alone,
at 11:40 a.m., 1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40
and 9:40 p.m.
Rialto—“As You Like It,” at 1:15,
3:21, 5:28, 7:40 and 9:53 pm.
Little—“Les Miserables,” at 11 am.,
1:11, 3:22, 5:33, 7:44 and 9:45 pm.
Ambassador—“Charlie Chan at the
Opera,” at 2, 3:55, 5:55, 7:40 and 9:45
pm.
Tivoli—“Hideway Girl,” at 1:55, 4,
8:05, 7:50 and 9:40 pm.
Uptown—“Our Relations,” at 1:55,
4, 6:10, 7:55 and 9:45 p.m.
Sunday, January SI—8:15 FJL
"Human
Solidarity"
UNITED LODfiE OF
THEOSOPHISTS
Hill Building 1
17th and Eye Sts. N.W
No dees, fees or collections.

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