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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 15, 1937, Image 49

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1937-07-15/ed-1/seq-49/

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. * LIFE’S LIKE THAT. —By NEHER.
“MAW'S LOST TH' AIjMANAC . . . GUESS WELL HAVE TO TAKE TH'
WEATHER AS IT COMES, PAW.'1
11 . .
- MODERN MAIDENS
Wl^fMWT TV A f, U Right* R/w ml
"WHAT DID YOU SAY? I CANT HEAR YOU.”
HOW TO TORTURE YOUR WIFE. —By WEBSTER I
(-7-\
ano here iv/e tost s
Finished lecturikig, \
The Bovs about ecv^M^o I
lo The Table locking I
uks Tramps ! /
1 /<yc
LETTER-OUT |
BY CHARLES H. JOSEPH.
| SELAH Letter-Out and he la healthy.
2 SENILE j erally hang washT***1* 70U Ben" I ^
♦ 3 PLANETS j Let ter-Out for tuck,.
4 NOISE I term*rOUt ,0r * m*thMn*tlc*1 q
5 VOMERS Ietter-Out and h. atlra.
Bemovt on# letter from each word and rearrange to a pell the word
tailed for In the last column. Print the letter In center column opposite
the word you have removed It from. If you have "Lettered-Out” correctly
you get a Spanish gentleman.
* Answer to Yesterday’s LETTER-OUT.
<a.
- j QTJOTER | | Lett*r-0ut ,nd 11 e°Ter*th*
at^_
2 ARCHERY I A I I*tt*r'°ut for *Ustr ,ru,t- o
I n I CHERRY L
• 3 VELVETS I V I turn heads. k‘n<l °f O
| f I SVELTE «J
■ 4 SECURE I F I to tmeat?Ut *n<1 *m°k'ni d°“ “ A
I “ | CURES “
* —
L * 5 FLINCHES I N I *h,t Junlor doe‘ r
I n I FILCHES 3
(Oonvrlght, 1087.)
X i >
Sonnysayings
7/S
Cm tm. Kw» . «•••»"•*
We is Just sittin’ here quiet an’
thinkin’ what we would have did if
we had 12 tickets to the circus!
THE CHEERFUL CHERU&
If you take another's I
gladness
On your life it leaves
v scar - —
If you share another’s
troubles
You are happier by !
far.
Bedtime Stories
BY THORNTON W. BURGESS.
And In the end you're sure to win.
Persist In what you once besin
—Old Mother Nature.
CALLY SLY the Cowbird was out
of luck. Yes. sir, she was out of
luck. At least she considered herself
out of luck, although her feelings were
not shared by her feathered neigh
bors. She had come back from the
Sunny South earlier than usual and
had decided to do her egg laying
earlier so as to have a longer Summer
free from duties of any kind. She
had no intention whatever of caring
for those eggs herself. She thought
herself clever enough to make her
neighbors do this for her. But, it
being so early in the season, there
were few nests as yet, and these few
were not of those she ordinarily would
choose to be foster parents to her
children.
Then Sally made a mistake, to
begin with. Her first egg was laid
in an old nest. In her hurry she had
mistaken it for a new nest of Mr.
and Mrs. Phoebe. Her second egg
she laid In the nest of Welcome and
Mrs. Robin. Promptly it was thrown
out on the ground and broken. To
say the least, this was discouraging.
A third egg fared no better.
“I’ll wait," decided Sally Sly. “I’ll
wait until more of the folks from
the Sunny South arrive. Anyway. I
would rather leave by babies to the
care of some of those not yet here
than to any who are here now.”
So Sally Sly spent her time wan
dering about with a lot of equally
carefree companions having a good
time. Every day there were new arriv
als from the Sunny South. Most of
them remained for a few days only
and moved on farther North. But
some remained, and almost at once
these began to look for places to build
nests. Sally Sly was not in the least
intersted in those who would not stay,
nor in any of the larger birds who
would stay. But the smaller folk,
those smaller than herself, she spied
upon constantly. She was very clever
about it. She kept herself pretty well
out of sight. She sneaked about
under cover of the shrubbery and
watched her neighbors. When she
would discover one carrying building
material she would watch and follow
that one until she found where that
material was being taken. In this
manner she found every nest that
was being built or had been built in
or around the Old Orchard. Some
nests were in trees. Some were in
bushes. One or two nests were on
the ground. Sally knew them all,
who built them and all about them.
It is doubtful if any one else in or
around the Old Orchard knew as
much about the featherd folk living
there as did Sally Sly.
Not only did she know where all
the nests were, which was the softest
which was the deepest, which was
the best hidden, which was most
securely built, but she knew also
which of the various couples who had
built them could most easily be im
posed upon and would be most likely
to be the best foster parents.
She left one egg In the nest of
Little Friend the Song Sparrow,
hoping that It was not so unlike the
three ggs In the nest that It would
be noticed. When she went around
the next day to see If it was still
there and found that it was she was
satisfied. ‘'Mrs. Sparrow is a good
mother, so there is nothing to worry
about there,” thought she.
She left an egg in the nest, the
beautiful deep, soft nest, of Sunshine
the Yellow Warbler. Of all the nests
she had found she liked this one best.
It would be a wonderful home for a
baby Cowbird. There were two eggs
in the nest when she left one of hers
there. She wished it was not so
much bigger than the others. It
would be likely to draw unpleasant
attention from the owners of the nest.
But even if it did, she was sure that
they couldn't throw or kick it out of
the nest.
Three days later she returned to
see if all was well with the egg. She
was checking up. As she approached
there seemed to be something odd
about that nest. When she was near
enough to look into it she couldn’t
look into it. She couldn’t see her own
egg or any other eggs. That nest had
been roofed over, and that roof was
the bottom of another nest. Those
warblers were building a new nest right
on the other. They had no inten
tion of hatching out that egg of Sally
Sly’s.
But this was Sally’s last failure.
She left an egg in the nest of Chippy
the Chipping Sparrbw, one in the nest
of Redeye the Vlreo, and one in the
nest of Zee Zee the Redstart. All of
these were accepted, unwillingly it is
true, but accepted Just the same. So
persistence won.
(Copyright, 1937.)
-•-—
Twizzler Answer.
Than were three artists working on
thajofc
It
THE MOUNTAIN BOYS. _Bv PAIII ™
iAKCS AUVftf V/TUMPIN TOAD
what you.a-skeeredS progs' J
OF — AH AINT GOIN* y DON'T G\T go B
TO HURT ‘YOU NONE../ DANG CLOSE, f
jtesww. . , -- AH GOTTA GIT /
'P \ HOME. NO«4j
ijpc ^ xmgpm S*W / / / > 11 ‘
--—?>
GOOD-eVE. WlLLIE-E-E-*/
AH LIVE UP THAR ON THE.
1 RIDGE.. WHY DON'T YA COME
^ UP AN* GEE ME. SOMETIME.?
WHAT'S AILIN' YOU, WILLIE?
YOU BEEN' ACTIN' LIKE.
A DYIN CALF- IN A IT'S
THUNDERSTORM. MT *»aMETHIMl
<•**** X vahl-ah did
BEUEVEJ UNTIL AH SOT
AT * / MAH RRSr
tMRST SQUINT^ ) PAIR o' SPEjCS
^-n,,. . ,, T^S A,N* SEEN
» 4, . f WHAT AH 6dT,
‘^"(Vfc. •
^ h.
THE BOSS. —Bv TIM
I-1-1-1-1—1 I---1-1---I r-w,* --,---„ „■ ■ _y lliT1*
"J.* IW Nmumci Sywfcata
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE. New Faces. -By GRAY
WELL, THAT'S 1 f HOW TRULY
| A GOOD JOB I FORTUNATE
1 WELL DONE-) THAT SHE IS
»---RESCUED
§ THE PAPERS \ FROM THE \
ARE ALL SIGNED- INFLUENCE OF I
i EVERYTHING IS THAT OLD /
H OGRE- j—
nil I 4WW! ' K
'] HE ACTUALLY i1 HIS EYES-HE
TERRIFIED ME- « STARED AT ME
-*<v IT WAS
[ THANK GOODNESS; TERRIBLE -
THERE’S A LAW
TO SHUT UP HIS WHY- HE’S
KIND OUT OF DANGEROUSLY
HARM’S WAY- INSANE
Nr
( INSANE? CRAZYSILENCE . ,
WHY? JUST 'CAUSE >-—-S
NOT ONE O’ YOU { WHY! WHY?
IS SMART ENOUGH / I NEVER!
TO UNDERSTAND / >-—
HIM? CAUSE HE / /THERE! SEE?
KNOWS MOREti / NO TELLING
A MILLION J WHAT IDEAS
LIKE YOU!!! / HE'S GIVEN
v-„—^ Ithe child -/
I r^rzx
/ V N N>„ v>n^r^?
f AH- HA’ HA?
HERE WE ARE
HERE, ANNIE.
ARE VO UR NEW
RAPA WNO MAMA- ARRUMPH-|
HELLO )
THERE, (
L kio — y
BEN WEBSTER’S CAREER. Strategy? —Rv EDWIN 41 CFR.
I ~ * . i ■ ■ - ■ -— ■ . —m _ •
f 60 THAT FOOL eUGIUtER. IS
rl MESSIU' AROUUD \W THIS. EH ? YJELL,
i'll FI* that tub, too -
I
»‘ve cot n / i've {—s
'OOT tt l CRABBER OF <
THE GOMTlMEKlTAL TELLS
ME TRADD JORDAN'S Off
OU THE DESERT SOME: r
PLACE A LID CAUT BE I
\ REACHED By WIRE OR J
^"-^TELEPHOvafc-_/
" MAWU* THE VJE®6TER WO «&EEM LIRE >
PHOMEY YJITHOUT AUTHORITY->
AH’ THAT MEAN‘S I'AATHE
. COMPLETE BOSS
1 O' the
NUGGET
4 liney
. A A^i
KEEPING UP WITH THE JONES.” Is That Nice, Al? -By POP MOMAND
I________ _____
^WOW ABOUT^y-^MO, AL.I! I'nTV,
A GAME OP J A SICK. MAM
Checkers ) tw' mumps wave
TO PASS y\ REALLV GOT
TW TIME T \ Me OOWNJ1
A WAV'? J >x.
A_
I
THE I\EBBS And the Winner? —By SOL HESS.
MRS. EUGENE C.
SMITH
SEATTUC, WASH,
OOESIsTT LIKE ANlV
OF EMMAS PRESENT
SUTORS.WAWT5 HER
TO IMARRV SOMEONE
VnORTHV OF HER.
ESTHER OCKFEN,
-MAY, WASH.,
OR POTTS.
SO DOES THE REST
OF THeFAMlUV.
MRS DELBERT
'WOLVERTON,
COOPERSVILUE.TO*
WAUT5 HERT3MM»y
FUNT-MAVBe IT
CAN BE ARRANGED;
^OOCANNEVER-reiX
f VJEU.,VM SURPRISED WWEM SOU 6Of So"sli
IVOURE STILL SlRKSUE \MAMV VOU CAMT ^
UJTW ALL THOSE SUITORS J DECIDE SO QUICRi _
THAT SEEK VOOFL ' /TlUO OF 'EM IS HAVlNJ
1 POCXET-DOOK IM A FIGHT OVER. ME
^MARRIAGE ~Xz \MOUJ_AMD
5 T
fcoS^-TuS^ ASC! voo^ll
\Srro sS&WS? jOCDERM ME ANdI
l^mAKrtCTUF " Jtwev aikJt no
KviNTERS TWAT WAVE
/ PASSED OVER-VOUR- MEADW B
WAVE LEFT A TRACE IN MX>R )
‘ WAR. AMO FATWERTtME ISA, ;
PRESSING TWE SIGN CP AGE /T JL_
v-NOURFACE.^g^^S^
pAJOO BESIDES 1 GOT" A
f FELLER .ME BROOGUT V, —
ME CAMCW AMO PAPFV TPBACCV,)
Li WISH HSO SEE 'VOO-TWEMI s' *=
Kueouke ME BETTER, r—
REG’LAR FELLERS. Mother’s Helper. -By GENE BYRNES
r-———i -:-1 mm--:-1 i-:-1
NOW, WHERE DO YOU THINK 4 .
YOU RE Q)INQ,YDUNC, MAN ?
.v JQ I.,
I thought id ^o out with
THE FELLERS, MOM, IF
YA DONT MIND/
7“
A FINE ONE, PINHEAD.'
ALL THE WORK I WAVE TO DO
TODAY/ I SHOULD THINK /
YOUD RATHER STAY IN It
AND HELP ME.'
au£T~ iJ tk
I WAS COIN OUT TQ HELP
YA, MOM /i WUZ. <;0IN SWIflMIN
AN' SAVE YOU THE TROUBLE
( OF qiVIN ME A BATH/
. Ill TmAAX I I
HffiTG— «Trm.
MUTT AND JEFF. Jeff May Feel a Little Kittenish, but Not So Catish. —Bv BUD FISHER.
¥ don't YOU KNOU THAT
I MUCH DRINKIN6 STUMPSYouRM|
1 GROWTH? YOULL NEVER
L 6Rovu any^taller.1
NO.' iN PACT lE Voodon't
STOP DRlNKlNS VOO’LL 6ET |
SMALLER AND SMALLER i

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