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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, July 23, 1937, Image 3

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. REPORTER QUIZZED
ON FORDPARLEY
Labor Board Tries to Con
tradict Story of Bennett
Conference.
By the Associated Press.
DETROIT. April 23.—Attorneys for
the National Labor Relations Board,
cross-examining a Ford Motor Co.
witness today, sought to contradict
his testimony he was with Harry Ben
nett. Ford personnel director, for more
than three hours on the day union
organizers were beaten at Ford's Dear
born plant.
Arthur Ogle, Detroit News reporter,
told Trial Examiner John T. Lindsay
* yesterday he was with Bennett until
3 p.m. and returned to the News office
•bout 4 o'clock on May 26. A Gov
ernment witness earlier had testified
he heard Bennett call "Good work,
boys,” after the riot, to two men he
•aid participated in the flghfing.
A N. L. R. B. complaint charging
v-the Ford Co. with unfair labor prac
tices alleges the company instigated
"brutal and malicious" assaults May
26 on United Automobile Workers'
members trying to distribute union
literature outside the Dearborn plant.
Ogle testified he drove back to the
News office with David J. Wilkie, chief
of the Detroit Associated Press Bu
reau.
A. P. Story Is Shown.
Christopher Hoey. board attorney,
showed Ogle an Associated Press story
timed 3:44 p.m. and signed with Wil
kie's initials, indicating it was written
after Wilkie reached his office in the
News Building.
Another piece of Associated Press
copy, timed 2:50 pm. and quoting a
v telephone conversation with Bennett,
•iso was shown by Hoey. who said it
was the Government's contention Ogle
and Wilkie had left Bennett before
that time. This story was written by
R. P. Hujjbart.
Ogle had testified Bennett received
only two telephone calls during the
time he and Wilkie were with the
personnel director and Hoey con
tended that had Hubbart telephoned
during that time Bennett would have
informed Wilkie.
Louis J. Colombo, chief Ford coun
sel. objected to introduction of the
testimony and Lindsay withheld a
ruling on it.
Edward T. Edmundson. photog
rapher employed by the Ford company.
Identified several photographs of
w property near the scene of the May 26
fighting, but Lindsay would not per
mit him to identify the property as
belonging to the company.
The company introduced testimony
In an effort to support its contention
that union leaders, who were beaten
* oj^side the Rouge plant May 26 while
^stributing literature were trespass
ing on private property. The union
contended they were on public ground.
Court
(Continued From First Page.)
ing years when court agitation was
prominent, he said, the courts listened
and made their decisions more along
Judicial lines than legislative lines.
That situation prevailed, he said.
Until the administrations of Presidents
Coolidge and Hoover, when the courts,
he asserted, proceeded more along leg
islative lines.
This brought a realization generally,
the spokesman continued, that agita
tion had to be renewed, and this was
begun with President Roosevelt's sur
prise message to Congress on February
5 requesting a revision among the
lower and highest courts.
Much of Program Accomplished.
The spokesman asserted that Presi
dent Roosevelt believed an interesting
parallel now exists as a result of the
administration effort in this Congress
■" with the days when the "courts lis
tened.” Therefore, he believed that a
large part of his court program has
already been accomplished, tempora- !
rily at least.
The spokesman said that before
February 5. the Supreme Court held
the agricultural adjustment act un
o constitutional, but that after the
Chief Executive's court recommenda
tions had gone to Congress, the Su
preme Court in effect overruled itself
in the A. A. A. decision by upholding
the social security act.
The same thing was true in the
case of the outlawing of the Guffey
coal act before February 5 and the
upholding of the Wagner labor rela
tions act after that date. The spokes
man said there was a similar parallel
also in the New York minimum wage
Jaw case, which the court held un
constitutional, while afterward it up
held the Washington minimum wage
law.
*- The net result, the spokesman said,
Is that the President feels the ad
ministration has attained certain of
its objectives.
One of the principal gains the
President was represented as counting
was that the country has been made
court conscious and Constitution
minded. It has reached the conclu
sion as a result of the court dispute
in Congress, he added, that the Con
stitution is not intended to block so
cial and economic reforms if they are
necessary to the general welfare.
Still liinr Wav 1a fin
The administration spokesman was
asked If President Roosevelt was sat*
isfled with this measure of progress
and replied that he felt he was making
progress, but still had a long way
to go.
Asked if the President considered
further legislation on the subject was
desirable, the spokesman called atten
tion to his recommendations on the
subject and added that Congress has
three methods of acting—not acting
at all, rejecting recommendations and
approving recommendations.
The spokesman noted that there
already was apparent among certain
elements of Congress a feeling that
Congress now should go home and
leave the remainder of its work to a
future session.
He asserted that an Important pub
lisher recently called on the Presi
dent and Inquired why he wanted
anything else new, asserting that peo
■* pie were more prosperous now than
they ever had been before.
t The spokesman said President Roose
velt told the publisher that during
the Coolldge administration the gen
eral attitude was "everything’s lovely—
don’t rock the boat—just let every
thing alone."
The President went on, the spokes
man said, by citing as an example a
prospective cotton crop of 14,500,000
bales this year. This, he said, was
more than could be used or exported
and will mean that much of it will
„ be added to a current surplus.
Going on with his Illustration, the
* President, according to the spokesman,
said that suppose Nature is good again
h l
next year and the Government does
not move to stabilize conditions in
the cotton industry, in such an event,
he was represented as telling the pub
lisher, it Is possible that the country
will see 8, 7 or even 6 cent cotton
again.
Whereupon the publisher was said
to have advised the President "to let
Nature take its course.” To which the
President was said to have replied by
recalling what happened in 1929
The President was represented as
believing that the same philosophy ap
plies to other crops, to wages and
hours, housing and Government reor
ganization programs.
The whole situation, the spokesman
added, is in the lap of the legislative
branch of the Government. It must
decide what the future is going to be,
he added, whether it is to be uncon
trolled as he said it was in 1929. or
whether reasonable legislation is to be
enacted to prevent another crisis.
It is up to Congress, the administra
tion spokesman added, to say when it
is going to quit.
---•
Airport
_(Continued From First Page.)
ment, which showed they were negli
gent, or they did know of it. which
showed a lack of good judgment," Mass
said.
Airport Close By Undesirable.
Navy officers told the committee the
Cheltenham site is to serve as a prov
ing ground for all types of radio de
velopment and that, coupled with the
new station now being built at An
napolis, it will replace the famous
naval radio station at Arlington, Va.
It is possible that the Arlington tow
ers, for years an outstanding feature
of the nearby Virginia landscape, may
be torn down within three years, the
subcommittee was told.
The Navy already has purchased 559
acres at Cheltenham and expects to
have the first unit of the great radio
plant there in operation by next Janu
ary. To provide adequate protection
against encroachment which would in
terfere with this radio work, it was
proposed that as much as 2.000 acres
of additional land be acquired there
by the Navy.
It was a primary consideration in
selecting the Cheltenham site that the
location should be away from any
airport, airline, traffic or automobile
highway, commercial radio station or
industrial development which might
create radio interference, the sub
committee was told by Admiral C. E.
Courtney, director of naval commu
nications.
Mutual Interference.
He said it was a surprise to the
Navy when he learned through the
newspapers that Camp Springs had
been selected as the local airport site.
The Navy was not consulted by the
Airport Commission, he said. The
Navy has priority in that area by
occupancy. Admiral Courtney testi
fied. “If the airport had priority, the
Navy would never have chosen the
Cheltenham site.”
The officer testified that radio
towers 300 feet in height or more will
be constructed and that there would
be "mutual interference” between the
radio station and any airport in that
vicinity. Cheltenham was selected
two years ago as the most suitable'
location in the vicinity of Washing
ton for the proposed radio develop
ment because it is removed from
automobile highways and industrial
activities and because it is in the only
sector out of Washington not crossed
by airlines. The radio site is 20 miles
from the Navy Department by road
and 14 miles by airline.
Comdr. W. J. Ruble, naval com
munications, told the subcommittee
the Cheltenham development was
authorised by Congress on April 15,
1935 and that the first funds became
available August 1, 1935. Construc
tion began a year ago and work so
far completed includes an approach
road, buildings, sewer and water con
nections, a power line and the begin
ning of technical construction.
Ruble said there is a difference in
elevation of only 20 feet between the
Cheltenham and Camp Springs sites
and expressed the opinion that radio
towers would constitute serious hazards
to air navigation in bad weather. He
declared that airports in the future
are going to be ‘ tremendously active
centers of radio transmission” and
that there would be serious radio in
terference between the two activities.
Still fighting for a “close-in” air
port, Representative Nichols, Democrat
of Oklahoma, predicted meanwhile of
Congress will give the Washing ton
Hoover Airport authority to expand
by taking in part of the Department
of Agriculture’s experimental farm in
Arlington, Va., the officials would
spend $500,000 in developing it into
one of the finest landing fields in the
country.
Nichols, who served as secretary of
the Congressional Airport Commission
which picked the Camp Springs site,
believes this location will be too far
removed to be of value for commer
cial planes making short flights be
tween Washington, New York and
Pittsburgh. Passengers, he said,
would spend nearly as much time go
ing to the Camp Springs Airport as
they would in the air.
For transcontinental planes, Nich
ols said the Camp Springs airport
would be ideal. He is not opposed to
the Oovernment locating a model air
port there, but thinks the Washlng
ton-Hoover field should be extended
for the benefit of planes making short
inter-city flights.
Sees No Cost to District.
Nichols said the Washington
Hoover Airport has not cost the tax
payers of the District a cent, and the
l~ l
cost of its expansion would not be
saddled on the District because he is
confident the officials of the airport
would be willing to bear the expense
if Congress will give them a lease to
use part of the experimental farm.
"For that reason,” he declared, "1
cannot understand why the people of
the District and the newspapers don’t
make a united demand on Congress
to give the Washington-Hoover Air
port officials authority to enlarge the
landing field.”
"I am sure it will always be that
way even if the Camp Springs site is
developed by the Government into
the best airport in the country," he
said. "Planes plying between New
York and Pittsburgh will not use the
Camp Springs airport, except in bad
weather. It is far too removed from
the city to be of service, for short
haul passengers. Planes on these short
trips could not compete with the rail
“Mr. Pershad of India” Conies to Town
* °.u can take your choice about identifying any of these men as the mysterious ‘‘Mr. Pershad
of India, believed to be a rajah of some importance in his native land, who arrived with this party
warning at Washington- Airport. The man with the brief case, Gudio Tanner, representative
of Thomas Cook & Sons, travel agency, refused to identify any of the men or allow them to be
interviewed. _star staff Photo
------ t
Chronology of Court Fight
Yesterday’s Burial Ended Battle That Had Raged
for 5 Months and 17 Days Over
Supreme Court’s ’’Veto.”
THE bitter fight over the Presi
dent's Supreme Court proposal
raged 5 months and 17 days
before the Senate decided yes
terday to bury the question. A list of
the Important dates and events in the
struggle follows:
February 5—President Roosevelt
asked Congress for power to appoint
six additional justices if incumbents
past 70 refused to retire.
February 10—The House approved a
bill permitting Justices to retire at 70
with full pay.
February 26—The Senate approved
the same measure.
March 4—President Roosevelt, at a
Democratic victory dinner, called for
action "now" to overcome Supreme
Court "vetoes" of New Deal programs.
March 9—President Roosevelt told
the Nation in a broadcast address that
"we must take action to save the Con
stitution from the courts.”
March 29—The Supreme Court up
held the Washington State minimum
wage law for women, the railway labor
act and the mortgage moratorium act.
April 12—The tribunal, by a 5-to-4
decision, upheld the Wagner labor re
lations act.
May 18—Justice Van Devanter. a
consistent critic of administration en
actments, announced his retirement.
May 18—The Senate Judiciary Com
mittee. after long public hearings,
voted, 10 to 8, against the court bill.
May 25—The Supreme Court upheld
the social security act.
June 14—The Senate Judiciary
Committee recommended rejection of
the original court bill, declaring it
represents "a needless, futile and ut
terly dangerous abandonment of con
stitutional principle.”
July 2—Administration forces pro
posed a compromise bill to permit ap
pointment of one additional justice
each calendar year if incumbents past
75 do not retire.
July 5—The Senate began bitter de
bate on the Issue.
July 13—Many House members
cheered criticism of the court legisla
tion by Chairman Sumners of the
Judiciary Committee.
July 14—Senator Robinson, con
gressional leader on the fight for court
reorganization, died of a heart attack.
July 15—President Roosevelt wrote
Senator Barkley, the acting Demo
cratic leader, that it was the duty of
Congress to approve reorganization of
the Judiciary, including the Supreme
Court.
July 20—Vice President Garnet- took
word to the President that a group
of previously uncommitted Senators
would vote to sidetrack the issue unless
a compromise settlement were worked
out quickly.
July 21—The Vice President asked
the opposition to state its peace terms
and was informed the administration
must drop any idea of enlarging the
Supreme Court.
July 22—The Senate votes. 70 to 20.
I to recommit the bill to the Judiciary
| Committee.
roads if they had to land passengers
10 miles out of the city,”
Nichols did not sign the Airport
Commission's report recommending
the Camp Springs site because It
failed to urge establishment of an
auxiliary airport closer to Washing
ton.
Lincoln
V “ II I II
(Continued Prom First Page.)
sent to conference and whipped into
shape there.
Members of the Senate Judiciary
Committee were hopeful, now that the
light over the Supreme Court has been
terminated, It will be possible to pro
ceed without further delay and pass
the proposed Judicial reform bill. It
will have to do merely with procedure
and with an Increase in the number
of judges of the Inferior courts.
Mend Party Harmony.
In the meantime, Vice PresidentH
Garner and other administration lead
ers set to work to mend party har
mony, which Mr. Roosevelt's court re
organization proposal had shattered.
Senators who had opposed the
President on the issue forecast, how
ever, there would be no reprisals.
8enator McCarran said he was
gratified he and his colleagues had
"brought to the attention of the Presi
dent of the United States and to the
attention of the people of the United
States the fact that he was led Into
error and, being led Into error, he is
big enough and strong enough to admit
his error and the country is no'/ safe.”
The motion to sidetrack the bill, up
held yesterday by a 70-20 vote, had
been made by Senator Logan, Demo
crat, of Kentucky, whose name was
on the administration compromise bill
offered earlier In July.
"Then the Supreme Court is out of
the way?" asked Senator Johnson,
Republican, of California.
"The Supreme Court Is out of the
way,” Logan replied.
"Glory be to God!” Johnson ex
claimed. The galleries applauded. Vice
President Garner rapped for order.
Then, without another word of de
bate, the roll was called.
Twenty “die-hards" voted “no”
Senator Norris, Independent, of Ne
braska, who was absent, was paired
against recommitment.
The 70 “ayes" included 53 Demo
crats, Shipstead. a Farmer-Laborite,
and the 16 Republicans. The noes
were registered by 18 Democrats. Lun
deen, the other Minnesota Farmer
Laborite. and La Follette, Progressive,
of Wisconsin.
Surrey Authorized.
The House Judiciary Committee, it
was disclosed today, has authorized a
congressional survey of lower Federal
courts to determine whether new laws
are needed to increase their efficiency
and speed ud litigation.
Chairman Sumners said the survey
would be made after adjournment by
a House subcommittee and possibly a
similar Senate group working together.
He said it would deal with three
subjects:
1. Need, if any, for additional
judges.
2. Need for rearrangement of judi
cial districts and places for holding
court.
3. Feasibility of making the Circuit
Courts of Appeals the final tribunals
for private lawsuits not involving
Issues of public interest.
Rearrangement Needed.
“It has been very obvious to us of
this committee,” Sumners said, "that
there is need for a rearrangement
among the district courts of Judicial
business of the country. Some have
too much and some have entirely too
little.”
He said the committee believed that
the only appeals to the Supreme Court
should be cases of "general or public
interest.”
“Such an arrangement,” he said,
“would give the Supreme Court
greater time in which to examine
and determine questions of general
importance.”
Sumners, who recently denounced
the Roosevelt bill, is the author of
the Supreme Court retirement act
under which Justice Van Devanter
left the bench. Some legislators have
suggested the shelving of the reorgani
zation proposal might bring additional
retirements from the court.
The Senate roll call on the motion
to recommit the court bill follows:
TO RECOMMIT—TOTAL, 1*.
Democrats.
ADAMS LEWIS
ANDREWS LOGAN
®T
BARKLEY McADOO
BROWN, of Mich. McCARRAN
BROWN, of N. H. McGILL
BULOW MINTON
BYRD MOORE
BURKE MURRAY
BYRNES O’MAHONEY
CLARK OVERTON
CONNALLY PEPPER
COPELAND POPE
DIETERICH RADCLIFFE
DONAH EY REYNOLDS
DUFFY RU8BELL
GEORGE SHEPPARD
GERRY_ SMITH
GILLETTE THOMAS, of Okla.
GLAM THOMAS, of Utah
HARRISON TYDINOS
HERRING VAN NUY8
HOLT WAGNER
JOHNSON. Of Colo. WALSH
KING WHEELER
LEE
BeeabUeans.
AUSTIN JOHNSON, of Calif.
BORAH LODOE
BRIDGES McNARY
CAPPER NYE
DAVIS STEIWER
FRAZIER TOWNSEND
GIBSON VANDENBERG
HALE WHITE
Farmer-Laberlte.
SHIP STEAD
AGAINST EECOMMITAL—TOTAL. *0.
Democrats.
bilbo hatch
black HITCHCOCK
BONE HUGHES
BULKLEY McKELLAR
CARAWAY NEELY
CHAVniZ_ SCHWARTZ
EUJENDER 8CHWELLENBACH
GREEN SMATHER8
GUFFEY TRUMAN
Freer essire.
LA POLLETTE
Farmer-La borite.
LUNDEEN
Pairs announced were: Bankhead.
Democrat, of Alabama, for: Norrta. Inde
pendent. of Nebraska, aealnst.
Position announced but not paired
Ha’den. Democrat, of Ailzona. for.
HEARINGS ARRANGED
ON NEW FARM BILL
Senate Committee Action Dims
Prospect of Passage
This Session.
The Senate Agriculture Committee
voted today to hold a series of hear
ings throughout the country on the
administration's new farm bill, provid
ing for more stringent production con
trol of five major crops.
Senator Pope. Democrat, of Idaho,
Senate sponsor of the bill, said the
committee action meant there was
"virtually no prospect” that the legis
lation would be enacted this session.
The committee proposed to name
a subcommittee of five to hold the
hearings. At least one would be held
in each of the five crop areas.
Senators Pope, Capper, Republican,
of Kansas, and Moore. Democrat, of
New Jersey, were instructed to prepare
a resolution for presentation to the
Senate, authorizing the "roving com
mittee of inquiry."
Chairman Smith of the full com
mittee was expected to name the sub
committee as soon as the inquiry is
authorized.
Pope said hearings would be held in
regions growing cotton, corn, wheat,
tobacco and rice and probably would
continue until mid-Winter.
SCOTTISH RITE BUYS
LOT FOR NEW HOME
Planning to build a new home, the
local Scottish Rite has purchased a
lot on the west side of upper Sixteenth
street, between the Italian Embassy
and the Church of the Latter-Day
Saints. The date for beginning con
struction is Indefinite. The cost of the
building will be kept “Inside of $500,
000," It was said today by John C.
Wineman, chairman of the Building
Committee.
The Scottish Rite now has its tem
ple at Third and E streets. This will
be abandoned when the new building
Is ready.
Associated' with Wineman on the
committee a^e Prank Stetson, Charles
C. Coombs, Monle Sanger and Robert
P. Smith.
SticfanSH
^ INSTALLED
COOL ENTIRE HOME
G1CHNER NA. 4370
\ Frama Straightening
ha
; 2020 M ST. N.W.
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at “CY” ELLIS’
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Dine here tonight I
Beer and Mixed Drinks.
SEA FOOD PLATTER
Consists of soft shell crab, _ —
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1011 E ST. N.W.
A
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G. W. King, jr., 51111th St N.W.
SEE US
BEFORE YOU CLOSE ANY DEAL
On o New
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PLYMOUTH
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MID-CITY AUTO CO.
Washington s Oldest
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1711 14th St. N.W.
Great Shaving
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Last Day—Saturday
1 Woodbury's Lilac Vegetal
| 1 Woodbury’s Hair Gloss
1 Can Talcum
25 Double-Edge Blades
1 Prep or Bay Rum Shav
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SUDAN CLOTH
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Broiled Maine
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WORSTEDS
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MOHAIRS CUT TO $8.90
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EXTRA! ALL-WOOL SPORT COATS
(were $12) NOW $6.90
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1012 F Street N.W. • 611 7th Street N.W.
Both Stores Open Saturday Until 6 P.M.
*
- I .

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