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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 15, 1937, Image 74

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1937-08-15/ed-1/seq-74/

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Pre-Views 1
Persons' in the public eye often
find pleas for money in their
morning mail. But how many
have been asked for a whole gold
mine? Probably no one but
J. Frank Dobie, the author. So
vividly does he spin tales of lost
gold and buried treasure that
people feel he must be a sort of
human divining rod. One treasure
hunter, claiming that he could
dream the exact location of gold
if he could sleep near it, offered
to strike a bargain with the
author — Dobie was to supply
the approximate location of lost
hoards — and the dreamer would
find them in his sleep.
When Mr. Dobie isn’t hunting
tales of buried treasure he is
tracking down the legends of his
native Southwest. In an early
issue he tells some fascinating
tales of a creature that plays a
prominent role in many of these
legends. Don’t miss:
“cunning don covote”
• • •
Wallace Irwin was bom in
Oneida, New York, a place fa
mous at the time for a colony of
people with unconventional ideas
about love. He hastens to add
that his parents lived a half hour
by motor from the colony, and
there were no motors then.
His father followed silver min
ing to Leadville, Colorado. Later
Wallace went to Cripple Creek,
and that winter the town burned
to the ground. He served as
one of the boy deputy sheriffs,
ridirtg forty-eight hours without
sleep “in a pretense of keeping
law and order.” His contribution
was to mistake a colonel for a
| gunman and shoot off his cap.
Even in the World War Wal
| lace’s opportunities to shoot
[ weren’t what they might have
| been. He was a war correspond
[ ent with the German, Belgian
and British armies, and later a
member of the Executive Com
mission for Relief in Belgium.
He’s plastered all over with dec
orations by the French, Belgian,
Swedish and Lithuanian govern
ments. He’ll have a humorous
story in an early issue. Look for:
“beautiful lady in black”
ft © Pad floagon
Drawing by Harry Stonar
For Amelia Earhart
by Nathalia Crane
j Emptied is old Lorenzo’s royal crypt; |!
Breathless now stands the startled Taj Mahal;
Amelia lies in that blue manuscript —
The sea, true heroine’s memorial.
So she achieves. What if the fatal prize
Be misty tomb with airy marble set ? jj
Who knows where Desdemona’s kerchief lies, !
Or where the last word of dark Juliet? j
A sudden courage plucks us from ourselves,
Bids us be heroine though death the price; jj
Wherefore we bed on many lilied shelves
The straight defenders of the sacrifice. j
Count her among the beautiful and brave, j
Her turquoise mausoleum in each wave. j
THIS WEEK
FICTION
Po0C
THE TREACHEROUS ROAD, Port I A Gripping Ham Soria! of Mmdorn India TALBOT MUNDY 4
Htaltratad by Marthal Frantz
HRST GLIMPSE OF LOVE A Up MomoalComot to a Uttlo Girl .... PATTERSON DIAL 7
dlnitrotod by LotHo L Bontoa
STAR WITNESS Am Off-tho Bantam TrackCrkmo Story.WILLIAM A. WHITE 1* j
Hlntratod by Lit Gottaaton j
ARTICLES AND FEATURES |
FOR AMELIA EARHART A .NATHAUA CRANE *
Drawimp by Harry Stomor
THE GYPSY CRISIS Homolott Bomamy Hoi Ho Plato toWandor .... EMIL LENGYEL •
UotlraHont by lotopk Simon!, Plmtoprophi
YOU CAN'T BEAT THE BUSH—FOR FOOD Potty Kally Tolli Why . . GRACE TURNER 14 j
Photoproph In Color
FOR SNAPSHOOTERS Potttw ThoapbtfnlCaro Into PktnmToklno.10 |
GOOD TASTE TODAY H Yon Can’t "Taka If.EMILY POST 11 j
STRANGER THAN MAN Aro Many Kindt ol Koon-Fyod Blrdt .... CARL KULBERG 11 j
WHAT OF IT? Why tko Prana It Foil ol Wrinklot.R. W. DAWSON 11
BEAUTY BREVITIES Cattlnp a Firm Flporo.MARTHA LEAVITT 1J
Drawimp by Malar Foiton
HERE’S WHYi Hiph bdoHipomto Faaort a Soporlor Morality.IRA S. WILE, M.D. 15
ANIMALGRAMS A Wintomo Trio Windt Up at— Hath.GEORGE HOPf 15
Conor Datigtt by I. B. Hazoitan
Copyrft
1 Snatches
Financial note from “The Paw
ling (N. Y.) News-Chronicle”:
Henry Morgenthau, Jr., Secretary
of the Treasury, is responsible for
the handling of more money than
any other living man. Recently,
while playing soft ball at Lowell .
Thomas’s athletic field, he had
the experience of being broke.
He had to borrow money to pay
for soft drinks for his family.
• • •
One of our comforting thoughts
is that everything that man can
desire or imagine, someone some
where will invent or create.
Mankind’s material desires are
limited only by man’s imagina
tion.
• • •
One of our Southern editors
says the most even-tempered ■
man in America lives in his town «
— he is always mad. I
* * * I
There is a man in Dutchess
County, N.Y., Henry B. Renner,
who recently inherited the house
in which he had lived for a num
ber of years. When the owner
died, he willed the house to the
tenant, noting in his testament
that he was giving this piece of
property to a perfect tenant.
Mr. Renner had paid his rent
every month one week before it
was due. ^ ®
\When Lindbergh flew the At- I
lantic, a prize was offered for the 1
best poem about his flight. It
was won by America’s youngest
recognized poet, Nathalia Crane.
The poem was “The Wings of
Lead.”
Nathalia Crane is an intensely
patriotic person. She is sensitive
to the drama of great deeds. Her
first poem, “The Janitor’s Boy,”
written when she was nine years
old, attracted attention on both
sides of the Atlantic. Since then,
she has published eight volumes,
including two novels. She is now
24 years old and a teacher of
poetry at Pratt Institute.
She has just sent us the best
poem we have seen as a tribute to
Amelia Earhart. It appears on
this page. M.
[L
« NATHALIA CRANE
Iht, 1*37, United Newapapera MUulne Corporation
1

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