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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, August 27, 1937, Image 6

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Mr. Carmody Ends His
Tour Through Hollywood
nThe Last-Day Whirl Takes in “Tom Sawyer”
in Technicolor, Claude Binyon and
a Few Postscripts.
BY JAY CARMODY.
HOLLYWOOD, August 27.—It was away out on the rim of Culver City
at the Selsnick studios that this trip to Hollywood drifted to an end.
With E. de 8. Melcher busy at this very moment whipping out a
brilliant funeral oration, which will occupy this same space tomorrow,
all we have to do is tell about visiting Norman Taurog on the set of "Tom
Sawyer.” And about seeing our first picture being made in technicolor!
The two of them constituted quite an adventure. When we drove into
the studio the imnression was that*
of landing back in the late nineteenth
century Just at the moment when
achool had "let out" in a Mississippi
Fiver town. The place fairly swarmed
with children, with Taurog standing
in the middle of the swarm looking
like a great blue whale. (He wears
one of these blue jumper work out
fit* which so many affect out here
and he is about the size of the north
wing of the Post Office Department
Building.»
Except for the presence of the blue
whale, the whole affair so obviously
was Tom Sawyer that no explanation
Cf the situation was necessary.
T#ie picture, Taurog says, is being
made ‘‘without names" except for the
names of Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer
and Selsnick, which are three pretty
good ones for any customer's 55 cents.
Young Tommy Kelly, a freckled-faced,
10-year-old of whom you never heard
maybe in spite of the publicity de
partment, is playing the part of Tom.
Biggest name in the cast is that of
May Robson, who somehow or other
manages to look remarkably energetic
for a grandmother, especially in view
of the fact that she is swathed In
grandmotherly garb of the last cen
tury and has to sit endlessly under
the very hot lights used in making
technicolor pictures. (The tempera
ture la terrific under those arcs.)
The presence of to many young
sters naturally turns the chat with
Taurog into a discussion of directing
them in pictures. It's one of the
easiest things in the world, he says.
Thoae with whom he la working now
are approximate novices before the
camera but they are giving startling
performance* because of their com
plete naturalism.
* * * *
“T'HEY have no preconceived ideas,"
Taurog tells you, ‘‘with the re
sult that they do what you tell them.
And they concentrate much more on
the Job than you might think."
He said it all with an emphasis
which keeps us believing it even
though in the scene we saw shot one
of the children did not do what he
was told and did not concentrate on
the job. Taurog laughed harder than
any one on the set when it happened.
The scene is that in the living room
when the family gathers around to
mourn the supposed drowning of Tom
(who at the moment is forgetting he
Is an actor and is marching around on
the rafters which support the roof of
the sound stage). The boy playing
Sidney is sitting on a table next to the
round-bellied stove. At the order to
go to bed from the grandmother, he
hop* down from the table and put*
his hand on the stove for support.
‘"What do you want to do, burn
your hand off?” Taurog asks with a
laugh. Even then, in the wave of
mirth which rattled off the stage
walls, the youngster did not realize
he had touched the stove which is
made up in the scene to look hotter
than any stove ever looked before.
‘‘Next time,” says Taurog, "remem
ber the stove is supposed to have fire
in It.”
The boy promises, the laughter dies,
the lights come on and the scene is
•hot all over again.
Almost a* interesting to the first
time visitor to Selzntck as the shoot
ing of ‘Tom Sawyer” is the publicity
department bungalow. It is the first
one ever built on a studio lot and
was the company’s gift to Gloria
Bwanson when she was In her heydey.
It still has that famous black bath
room. Including the tub, which once
was the talk of the town and made
ewery other star insist upon equally
luxurious facilities.
-*---1
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—“The Life of Emile
Zola," Paul Muni in an excellent
film biography: 2:30 and 8:30 p.m.
(All seats reserved.)
Palaee—"Broadway Melody of 1938,”
latest in the line of bright musicals:
11:35 a.m., 2.05, 4:35, 7:05 and 9:35
p.m.
Keith's—“Make a Wish,” new Bob
by Breen musical: 11:30 a.m., 1:15, 3,
4:45, 8:30, 8.10 and 9:55 p.m.
Earle—"Confession,” a mother in a
dramatic battle to save her daughter:
11 a.m.. 1:35, 4:15. 7:10 and 9:55 p.m.
Stage shows: 12:45, 3:30, 6:25 and
8:10 p.m.
Capitol—"Love Under Fire.” new
romantic comedy: 11 a.m., 1:40, 4:25,
7:10 and 9.55 p.m. Stage shows:
12:50, 3:35, 6:20 and 9.05 p.m.
Colambiar—“You Can’t Have Every
thing.” bright musical with a lot of
Rita brothers’ madness: 11:15 a.m.,
1:20, 3:30, 5:30, 7:40 and 9.50 p.m.
Metropolitan — "King Solomon's
Mines,” the dramatic jungle search for
King Solomon's treasure vaults: 11:40
a.m., 1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 and 9:40
p.m.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts. Show
runs 1 hour and 15 minutes, continuous
from 10 am. until midnight.
Rialto—“Dark Journey,” wartime
excitement with spies and “Q-boats”:
11:50 a.m., 1:45, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 and
8:45 p.m.
Little—“Mr. Deeds Goes to Town,”
revival of the Gary Cooper hit: 11 a.m.,
1, 3:10, 5:15, 7:25 and 9:35 p.m.
Ambassador—“A Day at the Races,”
the mad Marxes at their maddest:
8:15, 7:15 and 9:25 p.m.
Penn—"Knight Without Armor,”
love blooms midst revolution: 1:40,
8:40. 9:40 7:40 and 9:40 pm.
Sheridan—“Mississippi," the popular
Orosby musical revived: 2:35, 4:25,
8:10, 8 and 9:45 pm.
Tivoli—"Knight Without Armor”:
1:48, 3:40, 5:40, 7:35 and 9:35 p.m.
Uptown — “Exclusive,” a gal who
shouldnt plays with a newspaper:
t:08, 1:55, 5:50, 7:40 and 9:30 p.m.
Roadside—“A Texas Steer,” the
tamed old satire is revived: 8:30 p.m.
DANCING.
mA School With a National deputation.“
(Ovm 40.0*0 sspiU la 0. 8.)
Dor Martini StRdios
Thom who dance interestingly never need
worry about their popularity.
waltz, foxtrot, tango, rumba, top.
Tan Patient Talented Teachers
1811 H St. N.W. Nat. 3767 1
"Ron Martini conducts this branch."
A
Neville Ray, our host, said we could
take a bath in it if we cared to but we
didn't. We settled, Instead, for a soft
drink.
* * * *
QN THE list just ahead of Selznick
was a visit to Claude Binyon, the
plump young man on the fourth floor
of Paramount’s Directors' Building
who made Washington nearly die
laughing recently with his “I Met Him
in Paris” at the Earle and Metropoli
tan. Binyon as a writer has no right
in the directors’ building, you would
think, but there he is. The interview
is conducted amid sound effects pro
vided by Ernst Lubitsch, who is con
ducting a story conference just a cou
ple of doors down the hall. “Blue
beard's Eighth Wife,” the subject of
the story conference, ought to be a
great picture if it is half as funny as
the discussion of it implied.
Although he makes it look easy in
its final form, Binyon confirms the
conviction one gets out here that
screen writing is the most difficult
form of all. Having written everything
from news stories to novels and plays,
he ought to know.
The interview interrupts his work on
“True Confession,” which is going to
be done with Carole Lombard and
Fied MacMurray in the leading roles.
It is comedy and Binyon would rather
do comedy than anything else, al
though he did one of his major pieces
of work on “Valiant is the Name for
Carrie,” which starred Gladys George.
Binyon is droll in his description of
his working methods. He always writes,
he says, with definite players in mind.
He writes better that way, even when
it happens, as it occasionally does,
that Fred MacMurray plays a role
which he wrote with Clark Gable in
mind. Or when Claudette Colbert In
terprets a character which he draped
in ink around the shoulders of Carole
Lombard. Visualizing the interpreta
tion is the idea, even when he does not
get the interpreter visualized.
Postscripts: We finally won that
game of getting in touch with Azadia
Newman ... It was worth winning,
too . . . Miss Newman has just been
screen tested by Paramount and the
reports of the test are excellent . . .
She came here to paint stars, did
Joan Crawford and Carole Lombard,
and may end up by being a star her
, self . . . She would be a nice subject
for publicity departments to work on
. . . When the Ray Dannebaums of
Twent-Cent-Fox take charge the visi
tor sees Hollywood in a glance . . . The
Dannebaums live on top of the moun
tain which looks down on Lookout
Mountain . . . The latter is the spot
from which that sensational shot of
Los Angeles at night was made for
"A 8tar Is Born" . . . Remember it,
with all those neon lights flashing in
your eyes? . . . The step down from
the Dannebaums porch looks about
200 feet , . . No one ever has taken
it . . . Mrs. Barrett Kiesling, whose
husband's book, “Talking Pictures,” is
about to be published, is planning to
announce the event with a card stat
ing that the volume, weighing 1
pound and 2 ounces, has been born to
the Kleslings . . . And to a great many
schools which are planning to use it
as a text on the movies ... It is quite
an event in these parts and Mr. Kies
ling, as befits an author, is having to
take a lot of bows . . . And so, step
up Mr. Melcher and begin the final
column of the series . . . We are going
home! It was so nice of everybody.
And so veddy, veddy busy!
^ < 1
Props Don’t Seem to Fool the Actors
> t _
11
One of the hoys on the “Tom Sawyer’’ set leans against a stove without realizing it, even
though it is made up to look hotter than any stove ever did.
“The Life of Emile Zola”
Is Adult Film Biography
Paul Muni's Characterization Is One of
Uninterrupted Splendor in Fine
Cinema at the National.
BY ROBERT B. PHILLIPS, Jr.
IN THEIR annual contribution to the cinema's biographical files, the
Warner Bros, now give us Paul Muni as the central figure of "The Life
of Emile Zola.” Patiently and skillfully wrought, this semi-historical
saga of the great French novelist opened last night at the National
Theater amid the loud huzzas of those who have become bored with filmland s
preoccupation with love triangles and Rover boy stories. Here they found
gracious relief in an adult story about*
persons wnuse concerns in rue were
slightly more profound and stirring
than whimsical love making, cheap
melodramatics and crass humor.
“The Life of Emile Zola" is not an
‘arty’’ affair, but the picture is plain
ly designed to earn Intellectual pres
tige for its producers. Its art is con
fined to Mr. Muni's boundless craft
in reviving the body and soul of
a great man. If, however, Zola's
passion for truth and justice made
him, as Anatole France said, “for a
moment the conscience of man," such
pictures as these also represent mo
ments in the conscience of the mo
tion picture industry. It is here that
cinemaland dares to admit all is not
rosy in the world, to set aside the
boy-meet-girl and the hero-shoot
villain motifs, and assume for once
the stature of a fully developed mind.
Even so, those taboos always to be
considered in “selling the product"
are operative and mildly restrictive.
While “Zola" does not hesitate to
expose the military hierarchy in
volved In the Dreyfus affair, it very
neatly sidesteps the obvious fact that
racial issue* were at work in the
savage injustice dealt Capt. Dreyfuss.
Whereas it implies that Zola investi
gated and wrote bitterly of the con
dition* in French coal mines, the
point is not raised to the level of a
full-grown issue. Film producers re
gard these matters as “hot” and un
touchable in a too serious vein, and
their most sincere attempts to be
aggressively intellectual are, there
fore,. mildly stymied by the nature
of their business.
This has not, be assured, robbed
‘‘The Life of Emile Zola” of the glory
it attains as a drama in the last half
of the picture, or dimmed the un
interrupted splendor of Mr. Muni's
performance from his first moment
in the picture to his last. Zola a*
Muni portrays him is not *o exciting
a person as his Pasteur, to make an
obvious comparison, but the charac
terlzation is an almost symphonically
rounded creation—the final chord the J
natural outgrowth of the first.
One actor's consistency and skill ;
in projecting a personality cannot,
however, told tightly together a tale
lacking in dramatic unity. This is
the fault apparent in the initial half
of the film, where such episodes as
the interludes with Paul Cezanne,
the highly sentimental meeting with
"Nana,” the conflict with censorship
authorities, swing loosely and rather
aimlessly, bound together merely by
the fact that Muni appears in all of
them and that in each instance he
appears as Zola should be.
When the Dreyfuss case is drawn
into the plot, however, action, direc
tion, pace, import suddenly take on
new life, and it is here that the
picture justifies itself, both as drama
and as entertainment. For this emo
tional tightening, this intensification
of the meaning of the story, much
credit must be given to Joseph Schild
kraut as the beleaguered Dreyfuss.
to Gale Sondegaard as his wife and
to Donald Crisp—who, as counsel for
Zola in the famous libel suit brought
by the French general staff after
the publication of "J'Accuse,” sets
the pace for a court room scene that
is brilliantly brought off.
You must admit, by the way. that
script WTiters, director and producers
alike showed almost incredible re
straint in sticking to the historical
truth that Capt. Dreyfuss, who was
saved from living hell largely by the
daring and moral courage of Emile
Zola, never met the man w'ho had
been his chief benefactor (while we
admit that the failure to meet came
about for somewhat different reasons
than those outlined In the film).
■■ — ■ I ■ i
RAY MILLAND’S ROLE
Actor’* Next .Aswignment I* Part
Opposite Miriam Hopkin*.
AY MILLAND, one of Hollywood'*
handsomest leading men, ha* been
awarded the male lead in R-K-O
Radio'* “The Female of the Species,”
starring Miriam Hopkins. The pic
ture will be produced by P. 3. Wolfson
and will go before the cameras with
Leigh Jagon directing within the next
fortnight.
“The Female of the Species’’ is
taken from an original story by Allan
Scott and Charles Norman.
Milland, in his last three pictures,
has appeared opposite three of the
cinema's leading actresses. Including
Frances Parmer in “Ebb Tide,” Jean
Arthur in “Easy Living” and Wendy
Barrie in “Wings Over Honolulu.”
Miss Hopkins’ last picture for R-K-O
Radio was "The Woman I Love,” in
which she was co-starred with Paul
Muni.
—-•
IMMUNE.
The harem beauties in Eddie Can
tor's ''All Baba Goes to Town” didn’t
have any lure for Milt -Gold, the
Twentieth Century-Pox still photog
rapher. A* noon aa the film la com
pleted, he will be married to Bernice
iiiiiii .
— ■ X
Belt, and the two will go on a honey*
moon to Ensenada. Gold has been
snapping Hollywood's movie stars lor
15 years.
£teim—FUN—Dance
AzMMM/
CABIN JOHN OR GLEN ECHO
STREET CAR. 40. MIN. MOTOR, 20
MIN,, MASS, AVE. OR CONDUIT RD.
On S. S. POTOMAC to I
COLONIAL
BEACH
Lv. 9 o.m.—Back in I
(Washington 7:30 p.m. I
ltn-Mile Water Trip—Salt Water I
Swimming—Free Dancing—Meals I
Refreshments. Trips Every Sunday.!
Visit WAKEFIELD
Birthplace at Washington
Steamer-Bus connections
at Colonial Beach Sun
day. Plenty of time for
sightseeing.
Rmand Trip Colonial
Beach ta Wakefield. SI.M
• 1
MOONLIGHT
Cruises Nightly, 8:45
3-hour cruise. Free dancing to
Bernie Jarboe'a “Night
hawks.” Dining room. Beer kA
■ arden _ OVJC
Sum. and Hoi., TSe
a Fret Forking ot Wharf •
POTOMAC
V RIVER LIRE /
\ 7th & Water Sts. S.W. I
NAt 7722 V
A
K"7a$T ... FURIOUS \ /> ,
k md FDU ,| FUN! TODAY!
F These gay stars of “Love
Is 4n large >
N^. rations love this f
W* exciting romance . . .
that's with sus* gl | 1 ^
pense as
VAUDEVILLE ut ltCUOH |
^-Sjohnny PERKINSI
Sheila BARRETT,.*::;:::.-,. I
WALTER and PAUL BRIANT I
"A delirious novelty” V
sm ANN McCIBE MANN DUPREE MD LEI I
**Sonf Stylist” "Sophisticoted Rhythms” Bj
EXTRA—WILLIE HOWARD in "AFFAIRS OF PIERRE"
%%% i t ^ ii i i —
wqgw
mwU^S>r9f9^ ss?*5? I
mimwki.m$g-:
TODAY!. . . Paging oil FUN-LOVERS!
^ v
1 Killed the Man
My Daughter Kissed!..
Could any mother at by ad , 1
ae* her da ugh (era Lift wrecked / /THr^T^i
mhtrowalmd beta?The*. * 7
wm only at way to Mop ^
him. She took it... aid
raked the oae thing that
wm dearer to her than
life! Waa her tKrifice
to he in vain, or would
the future bold • hap
yin mi the put denied?
tfhal Woman Could
BlamoHer
Kcuf
FRANCIS
Qr£uMm
lAN^HUNTER . BASIL RATHBONE
JANl BRYAN . DONALD CRISP . NARY NACURS
FRESENTED BY WARNER BBOt
THE OEBONAIRS 1
and EMILY VON LOESEN
ROSS WYSE, JRjvith JUNE MANN
I MARJORIE GAINS WORTH—4 VESPERS
Warnor
Bros.
“BEST FUM OF THIS SORT SINCE ‘TRADER |
HORN ‘Liberty Magazint
TODAY |
m M t«N» « MdtuMt Ml MW Mm
«n*nMavHMr.. ******
Mi • M 4 M WvttM RM-ll M UK
KING ,
OLOMONS MINES
A C—mi'hmA tm* *)k Ate _ II
CedricHARDWICKE
ANNA LEE ^?®Silp|
ROLAND YOUNG
C - &
TRANS-LUX IM>* Ik***
NEWS: WAR, SPORT
i* MARCH OF TIME
S SHORT SUBJECTS
a _ ■ rr»TOD*Y
k f •1' U
° A 4*1 w I *U
l «*\ ^m«iN\.V5\ '
f ROPEYI vs. SINBAO
D 1936 Priit Color Cartoon /
IakHGAYETY
AMVOEXCES
That He Will Re-Open
His Season, Starting
This Sunday Matinee
With the
6L0RIFIED FOLLIES
Foal wring
NONA (Dynomic) MARTIN
AND !
Max Furhman and i
George Murray j
Ail Ptrtormonctt for Adults Only
THEATRE PARKING
• P.M. TO
1 A.M. jjC
CAPITAL GARAGE &*»l3y
One Hour Drive—Free Parking
Seashore Attractions—Amusement'
f requent Daily Bus Service From
40.1 11th Street N.W.
For Information Call NAt. B?13 |
II ' i
PREMIERE AUDIENCE
LAST NIGHT HAILS
SCREEN'S GREATEST
MASTERPIECE
Think Yen Washington. Thank
Yea Critics fe* Year Spontaneous
Applause and Plaudits . . . /
Virntt Bmj Proudly Prwent
•ss^mbn:
m Oar tf lit fat Giml Pmtmtm All Tim
I III wuo m cml §j i MtostULs
NOW SHOWING
Two Performances Daily
2:30 & 8:30 p.m.
Tickets Now On Sale for All Performances
Box Offue Opens Daily at 9 a.m.
NATIONAL
THEATRE
MUCES (INCLUDING GOVT. TAX*
Mitint*—»t—«Je—I.IO Evening*—We—*3c—146—4.0
ijl -«A«S IN ADVANCE—RESERVATIONS BY EHOK1
‘“'KEITH'S*
★ NOW_!
be will bring you
everything you'd with fW’j
for . . . *wjl
ROMANCE! Y/f\
&== LAUGHTER! %/*
SONGS!
BOBBY BREEN
(|* 8 asilVathboni
MAKE A WISH
wjfi mmle ty
OSCAR STRAUS
AN R. K. 0. RADIO RICTURI RIATURINf
II MARION CLAIRE
HINly A R M E T T A
DONALD MEEK
^ UlfH lOtlll
Comtng *
'The LEFT of the PARTY" with Joe Penoer e Gene Raymond
Parkyaharkue e Harriet Hilliard e Helen Broderick e Victor Moor*
ACADEMY of rt"SX
E. Lawrence Phillips' Theatre Beautiful
Continuous From 4 Mo P M. !
PAT8Y KELLY and LYDA ROBERTI to
“NOBODY'S BABY.”
OTTO KRUGER. LEONORA CORBETT In
“LIVING DANGEROUSLY.”
pADAl IN A 1,,h »nd N- c- At«
tAMIUllA Air-Conditioned
ROBERT MONTGOMERY and ROSALIND
RUSSELL In ' NIGHT MUST TALL."_
pIOpI r Home of Mirrophonie Sound.
UALLL Penn*. Are. at Slat St.
Matinee* Tun.. Thurv. Sat.. Sun.
MARX BROS . ALLAN JONES MAUREEN
O' SULL1 VAN in "A DAY AT THE
_RACKS. '_
DUMBARTON 1343 w,,e#n,i" *"•
Carrier Air-Conditioned
PATSY KELLY JACK HALEY in "PICK A
8TAR." News and Comedy._
TAIPV AWN ANACOSTIA, D. C.
rAHVLATTn Air-Conditioned
LLOYD NOLAN in "KING OF GAMBLERS"
I inn 3**7 M St. N.W.
LtlUxJ Double Feature
WILL ROGERS in AMBASSADOR BILL."
JACK RANDALL in RIDERS OP THE
_OAWNT___^
I ITT! r 608 9th St. N.W.
1 I LL Air-Conditioned
GARY COOPER and
JEAN ARTHUR in
“Mr. Deeds Goes to Town.”
PPINpCCC " TilB H St7N.E.
TaVIlaa-Coo Double Feature
OAIL PATRICK in “JOHN MEADE S WOM
AN " JOAN PERRY in "COUNTER
FEIT LADY."__
ccpo RT14 Georgia Are.
““v" Sllrer Spring. Md.
Continuous From (t oo PM.
“SLIM,”
PAT O'BRIEN and HENRY FONDA.
“YOU CAN’T BUY LUCK,”
__All-Star Caat.
QTANTftN 6th and C St*. N.E.
w I Ail 1 i/ll Finest Sound Euuinment
Continuous From 6:MU P M
ROBERT MONTGOMERY
and
ROSALIND RUSSELL in .
“NIGHT MUST FALL.”
TAirnMA 8th and Butternut St*.
1 Altl/iVl A No Parkins Trouble*
buw. u. kubinsun ina Berne, uavioiu
“KID GALAHAD.”
Selected Short Subjects.
Tomorrow, Continuous From 1 00 PM —
KAREN MORIaEY In GIRL FROM
SCOTLAND YARD. ’ GEORGE O BRIEN
In 'HOLLYWOOD COWBOY.”
STATE-BETHESDA *Betbee7e!’ Ml' I
JACK HEALY in I
“PICK A STAR.”
CHARLES STARRETT in
“DODGE CITY TRAIL.”
News, Cartoon and Serial.
NEWTON 1,u AT
_ Alr-CaalltliMi.
“The Singing Marine,”
_ DICK POWELL._
W JESSE THEATER "SSif
Carrier Air-Cendltlened
—5 “Captains Courageous,”
JJJ FREDDIE BARTHOLOMEW, s
S CVIVAM HI »"d E. L Are. N.W. '
2 SUiVAn Carrier Air-Cendltlened
s “SUPER SLEUTH.”
bd _ JACK_OAKIE. ANN BOTHERN.__ ,
CO PALM THEATER d*H-arat '
“NEW FACES OF 1937,”
JOE FENNER. HARRIET HILLIARD
ARLINGTON, VA.
HD! CAM liM Wlleen Bled.
fflLjUn Onn. Celeniel Yillere
JEAN ARTHUR end EDW. ARNOLD in ,
"EASY LIVINQ.” |
ACUTAN Clarendon. V*.
AOtllUn CHARLES STARRETT
la ■ WEBTEOPWD HAlLT7
f
AMBASSADOR VK&U*
MARX BROTHERS. ALLAN JONES
MAUREEN O SULLIVAN In ' A
_PAT AT THE RACES "_New. _
A pm i n MI H st. K.K.
ATUL.1.1F Phone Line. S37S
LLOYD NOLAN. CLAIRE TREVOR m
_1 KINO oP_GA.MBLER.S_ __
"AVALON 861 * 2Boo " w
L®CLSi.SftI1-LO MARY CARLISLE In
_HOTEL HAYWIRE _ Short _
AVENUE GRAND §g Z£j£j
Edward everett horton i -
_ WILD MONEYT_Short Sublet
fAI VFRT Wiaeansin Are.
LALTtni Cleveland 2345
Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
T j 'SAN QUENTIN ' with PAT O BRIEN
QC _and HUMPHREY BOGART_
U fFNTRAI 4-ft st. n.w.
Lm LUl 1 URL Phone Met. 284!
‘T! LEO CARRILLO MARY CARLIPI E
<3 In "HOTEL HAYWIRE " Short
U fOI ONY 4935 Gm" Aee. N.W.
"P" VJv,. , „ .* Geo. fiftOO
•C LEW AYRES. DOROTHY IJtMOUR In
Lm LAST TRAIN FROM MADRID
Also Short Subjert
HDIMF i*3o c st. n.e.
. • IWITIE Phono l.lnr. 10280
i/2 LEO CARRILLO MARY CARLISLE
Q _In "HOTEL HAYWIRE _Shnri_
og PENN 6ad &,".*-,ftS“•
QQ Matinee. 2:00 PM.
MARLENE DIETRICH and ROBEP""
DONAT In KNIGHT WITHOUT
eyA ARMOR " Alao Short Subjert_
S QAVftY 3030 14th St. N.W.
MIUI Phone Col. 4968
Z "EMPTY HOLSTERS." with DICK
^ FORAN. Also Short Suh-ert_
< SHERIDAN St*' N.W. Ea'n'*21*00
Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
Brought Back By Popular Demand
Return Engagement
BING CROSBY. W. C FIELDS In
•‘MISSISSIPPI/' Also Short.
TVvnVT 14th st* * p*rk n.w.
llVV/Lil Phone Col. 1800
Shors Continuous From j :4&
Alr-Condit loned
MARLENE DIETRICH and ROBERT
DONAT In KNIGHT WITHOUT
_ARMOR.’’_Also Short Subject.
IIPTfiWN f'onn- and Newark
uriunn st. n.w. cie?. 5400
Matinee. 2:00 FM
FRED MacMURRAY and FRANCES
FARMER In ‘ EXCLUSIVE. Short.
VfiPIf Ga. Are. and Qneheo
IUIVIV Place N.W. Col. 4818
FRANCHOTTONE. VIRGINIA BRUCE.
\ MAUREEN O’SULLIVAN In 1 BF
■ * TY VJilH OflOrt.
HIPPODROME Tnday-Tnmnr. ‘
CLARK GABLE and
MYRNA LOY in
^ “PARNELL.”
2 CAMEO
j MARX BROS, in
“DAY AT THE RACES.”
2 ARCADE Today*’ ****'
g F. BARTHOLOMEW and
a S. TRACY in
71 “Captains Courageous.”
5 RICHMOND ^dt^LV*’
Pat O'Brien and Humphrey Bo*art
In "San Quentin."
5 PFPn ALEXANDRIA. VA.
© RLLU Today-Tomor
~ RICHARD CROMWELL
« in “THE ROAD BACK.”
Jg Free Parkin* Space—son Car*.
_Completelr Air-Conditioned._
MILO ROCKVILLE, m.
Edward Arnold and Je*n Arthur in
“Easy Livine."
AIR-CONDITIONED.
Pree P»rkln*.
FALLS CHURCH. VA.
STATE LEE
IRAN HARLOW and I BOB STULE
CLARK OABLE In I fit TkUStTD
SARATOGA." I OUTLAW.'

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