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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, October 31, 1937, Image 6

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Negro Historians Gather Here
This Week for Annual Session
Achievements and Progress of Race Will
Be Discussed by Prominent Educators
%/
During 4-Day Meeting.
Bv CARTER C.. WOODSON.
Tounder and Dtrector*nf the Association for
the Study of Necro Life and History.
The Association for the Study of
Negro Life and History convenes here
today in its twenty-second annual
session. The conference will continue
through Wednesday.
A committee of 100 citizens in the
District of Columbia sponsoring the
conference has been organized with
various subdivisions to carry out in
detail the thorough preparation for the
assembly of investigators and teachers
In the schools and colleges of the
country where the study of the Negro
has been made an objective. Dr. Gar
net C. Wilkinson, first assistant super
intendent of schools, is the chairman;
Miss Susie R. Quander, a member of
the faculty of the Garnet-Patterson
High School, is the secretary of this
committee. The sessions will be held
In the auditorium of the Garnet
Patterson High School, Vermont ave
nue and V street N.W.
The announcement of the annual!
meeting of a learned society to docu- i
ment the history of the Negro comes
to some of the American public as a
surprise. A prominent citizen, well
informed on other affairs, inquired as
to what an undertaking of this sort
can accomplish when, as he had been
thinking, the Negro cpnie out of
slavery with nothing worthwhile be
hind him and looking forward to the
future that he may make history.
The staff of this organization and co
workers similarly interested through
out the country, however, have shown
during 22 years of painstaking re
search that the Negro race, like any
other branch of the human family,
has been accomplishing things from
time immemorial. They founded king
doms and empires in Africa which
antedated many of those in Europe
and in Asia, and at these centers of
their ancient culture they made dis
tinct contributions to philosophy,
science, literature and art.
Not All Were Slaves.
A young white man. a graduate of
the University of Maryland, who
came Into the office of the director to
Write a bond for the secretary-treas
urer of the organization, was surprised
to know that none of its objectives has
been to study the Negroes free before
the Civil War. He had the impression
that all Negroes in America were held
as slaves until that conflict ended with
the general emancipation. About
half a million, one-seventh of the
American Negroes, had alreeady be
come free. Many of these had at
tained the status of efficient mechanics
and artisans and a. few had gone into
me proiessions.
The association functions as an ;
agency disseminating this information '
among the white people. They. too.
need to know the Negro. Race hate
has developed because the better ele
ment of Negroes are not known to the
whites. The public knows all about
the crimes committed by Negroes, but
practically nothing about those who i
are trying to help themselves. This j
society aims especially to publish those j
worth-while achievements through the
magazines and books which are widely
circulated.
The purpose of this association is to
penetrate that background in order
to inspire the descendants of those
Negroes who were carried away cap
tive and enslaved in lands beyond:
their shores as was the case with
those who were brought here to the
United States to toil two and one-half
centuries in bondage. The histony of
the Negro does not begin on the plan
tations and in the mines of America
Certain portions of all races have at
times beeihenslaved. Slavery was the
normal condition of people in the
ancient world. Only one-third or
one-fourth of the people at that time
were actually free.
Have Impressed World.
With these objectives, the writer
founded the Association for the Study
of Negro Life and Jlistory in Chicago
September 9, 1915. Since that time
the researches and publications of this
learned society have so impressed the
world as to win the support of the
outstanding organizations of both
races in the United States, and the
work is not without a hearing in most
of the* learned circles of Europe and
Africa. Some of its most distinguished
supporters have been the late Julius
Rosenwald, the late Paul Warburg, the
late Dr. J. Franklin Jameson, Harold
H. Swift and Dr. James R. Angell, the '
retiring president of Yale.
The association has had a staff of
Investigators itself, and it works in eo- j
operation with others similarly con
cerned In various parts of the country.
Briefly told, the association has:
1. Directed the attention of investi
gators to his neglected field.
2. Extended the circulation of the
Journal of Negro History into South
America, Europe. Asia and Africa.
3. Published 22 volumes of articles
and documents giving facts which are
generally unknown.
4. Produced 25 monographs on Negro ;
life and history.
5. Organized and stimulated the j
studies of local clubs and classes, which 5
i - -. i. —.——I ■ |
have done much to change the attitude
of communities toward the Negro.
6. Collected thousands of valuable
manuscripts on the Negro, which have
been made accessible to the public In
the Library of Congress.
7. Had a number of young men
trained for research in social science
and for instruction in colleges and
universities.
Conference Has Definite Program.
The program of the annual meet
ing shows p.n eflort to develop the
thought along certain distinct lines,
namely, the contribution of the Af
rican Negro to civilization, the pres
ent status of natives on that con
tinent and the Negro in America from
the same point of view. On this pro
gram will appear scholars of born
races who have impressed themselves
upon the country as authorities in
this field.
At the first session today at 3 p.m.,
Prof. Lawrence*D. Reddick of Dillard
University will speak on "Race and
Class Attitudes of James Ford
Rhodes.” He will be followed by
Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune, presi
dent of the association, now con
nected with the National Youth Ad
ministration in Washington. She will
deliver au address on "Clarifying Our
Vision With the Facts.”'
. The visitors will be entertained at
a reception from 6 to 8 o'clock this
evening at the Phillis Whealley As
sociation, Rhode Island avenue at
Ninth street N.W. This affair will
be sponsored by the College Alumnae
Club. Tomorrow morning they will
be entertained at a writers' breakfast
in the same place, where will be dis
cussed the problems of the writers
and suggestions for their solution.
Dr. Charles H. Wesley will preside.
After visiting the schools of the
city early tomorrow the interest will
shift to the discussion of the back
ground of the Negro. At the session
at 3:30 p.m., Prof. Newell N. Puckett
of Western Reserve University will
speak on "Negro Names.” The next
speaker will be Dr. George Herzog of
Columbia University, who will bring
forward some thought growing out of
his study of "Native Life in Liberia,
With Special Emphasis Upon the Re
sults of Tests and Measurements witn
Respect to the Reaction of the African
Natives to Music.”
The evening session tomorrow will
be devoted to the topic of "Subordina
; tion and Unrest.” Pi-of. Lloyd A.
Cook of the Department of Social
--
| Science of the Ohio State University, I
will deliver an address on ‘•Imperial- j
ism: An Interpretation.” He will be i
followed by Prof. W. Lloyd Warner
of the Department of Anthropology of!
| the University of Chicago, who will j
: speak on "Tile Negro in the Amor- I
! ican Social Hierarchy.”
On Tuesday at 10 a m. the visitors
j will be entertained at an editors’ j
: breakfast, with Dr. Luther P. Jackson
of Virginia State College presiding, j
At tins time there will be a round
table discussion of the problems of j
the euitor of a scientific magazine !
and an evaluation of what has been ;
| hitherto produced in this field.
Following the annual business ses- j
! sion of the association at 1 p.m. Tues- i
day, there will be a discussion of
■'Documenting the History of the
Negro” at 3:30 p.m.. with Dr. John
C. Bruce of the Washington public j
schools presiding. At this sesson Dr.
Thomas P. Martin, acting chief of
the Manuscript Division of the Library
of Congress, will speak on "High
Points in the Activities of the British
Anti-Slavery Society with Special Ref
erence to the United States.” At that
time also Dr. Carl L. Lokke, formerly
a professor at Columbia University,
but m»w connected with the National
Archives, will speak on "The Na
tional Archives With Respect to the
Records of the Negro.”
The evening session on Tuesday will
be devoted to an address by Dr. W.
Sherman Savage of Lincoln University,
in Missouri, on "The Gldriings Resolu
tion," and another address toy Dean
A. F. Taylor of Fisk University, On
"The Negro in the Reconstruction of
Tennessee.” Four history prizes will
be awarded at that same hour.
Tour of City Wednesday.
Another feature of interest for vis
itors w'ill be a tour of Washington and
vicinity conducted Wednesday morn
ing by Col. W. A. Hamilton, a mem
ber of the Board of Education of the
District of Columbia. Much interest,
however, is centered on an important
exhibit of Negro art. with emphasis
upon the works of the late Henry O.
Tanper. This exhibit will be in the
Howard University Gallery of Art, un
der the direction of Prof. James Ver
non Herring of that institution.
At the session Sunday and the two
evening sessions on Monday and Tues
day, respectively, musical selections of
a high order will be rendered by some
of the best artists. The Cantoren, un
der the direction of Miss Mary L.
Europe, instructor in music of the
Dunbar High School; violin selections
by Everett Lee, selections by' the St.
George's String Quartet, under the
direction of Prof. Louia Vaughn Jones;
the Howard University Men’s Glee
Club, under the direction of Prof. Roy
W. Tibbs; a solo by Mrs. Vivian Col
lier Douglass, understudy to Ann
Brown, star of "Porgy and Bess"; se
lections by Todd Duncan, the star of
"Porgy and Bess.” He will be accom
panied by Prof. Cecil Cohen of the
Howard University School of Music.
Women’s Clinic Benefit.
A card party for the benefit of the
Women's Clinic, 4704 Georgia avenue
N.W.. will be given at 2 p.m. Friday
at the Thomas Circle Club, 1326
Massachusetts avenue N.W. Mrs. Ruth
A. Snodgrass, secretary and chairman
of the Ways and Means Committee, is
in charge of the party.
SESSION TO WEIGH
GUIDANCE OF YOUTH
%
Southern Woman’* Educational
Alliance to Hear Talk by
Mr*. Roosevelt.
With a study of problem* In the
guidance of rural youth featuring the
program, the National Board of Di
rectors of the southern Woman s Ed
ucational Alliance will begin its
twenty-third annual meeting at 9:30
a.m. tomorrow in the Mayflower Hotel.
Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt is to speak
at the final session Wednesday.
More than 50 prominent educators
from every section of the country have
accepted invitations to act as con
sultants at the three-day conference
termed the "Rural Youth Guidance j
Institute."
The session, open only by invitation>!
will Include discussions of vocational
and social orientation of rural youth
in the elementary high school and
out-of-school age groups. Emphasis
will be placed on the solution of
problems presented by heavily handi
capped rural areas.
The board also will consider chang
ing the name of the organization to
recognise its expansion into a na
tional scope.
Ickes Inspects Park Police
In approved military style, Secretary of Interior Ickes accepts
an officer’s gun for examination during an inspection tour he
made of the United States Park Police Friday. —A. P. Photo.
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