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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, November 20, 1937, Image 27

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FEED DE WEES
TO PROTECT TREES
Expert Gives Advice on How
to Prevent Destruction
by Animals.
Ways and means of preventing
rabbits, squirrels and other small an
imals from seriously injuring trees of
•uburban homes in the Winter season
•re offered today by Paul Davey,
prominent tree expert. He states:
"It is true of most of the rodents
who damage trees in the winter that
they are only obeying nature’s law of
self-preservation. Among these rodents
. may be included not only rabbits but
squirrels, gophers, mice and moles.
In the summer these rodents find such
plentiful supplies of food that they
are not likely to bother the woody
plants. But winter is a hard time for
them and they will take what they
must have to live.
Divided in Two Groups.
"The rodents may w’ell be divided
Into two groups. One would include
those we want to exterminate, such
■ as mice, pocket gophers, which are a
apecies of rat common in some local
ities, and moles. For these there ate
special traps and many mixtures of
poison bait. Meadow mice build run
ways through rubbish or litter and
feed above ground. Traps and poison
bait placed in special receptacles which
birds or other creatures not using run
ways cannot enter are recommended
for them. The pine mouse burrows
below ground with occasional entrances
and poison bait may be put into the
burrows or traps set at the openings. !
Moles do not do much damage to !
either bark or roots but their runways
are used by smaller rodents which do.
"The other group of rodents, such
, as rabbits, squirrels and woodchucks,
have some educational and entertain
ment value and any property owner
would like to have them around if
he felt they would not damage his
trees. They are particularly desirable
around a home where there are chil
dren. to whom they are a never fail
ing source of interest and delight.
Feed Desired Animals.
"The best way to keep these animals
from doing damage is to feed them.
Rabbits like apples, carrots, cabbage,
dry corn and many other kinds of
food which can be supplied at trifling :
* cost. Squirrels are most partial to j
nuts, but they will eat dry corn and |
fruits and vegetables when they are j
r_ hungry. The woodchuck who hiber
nates in the winter months is a
friendly and interesting fellow the
rest of the year. If you find a wood
chuck burrow and place food near it i
you will enjoy getting acquainted with
• new four-footed neighbor who is
easily tamed.
"To be sure you do not underesti
mate the appetites of your furry
• friends put mechanical guards around
young trees. A chicken wire or other
mesh cylinder placed around a trunk
several inches from the bark and held
firmly In place will keep them off.
Apple trees are a special attraction for
»11 rabbits. If they are hungry they
would as soon gnaw the bark of a
handsome flowering crab as some less
Taluable orchard tree. If there is any
Indication of rabbits it is wise to pro
tect the trunks.
Apartment Building Sold
I-7TT-- 1
This apartment, at 1441 Harvard street N.W., has been sold
by Carolina L Bonini to an undisclosed investor. The sale was
made by Donald M. Earll. —Star Staff Photo.
By DOROTHY Dl CAS AND ELIZA
BETH GORDON.
OW many times have you said
to yourself, when you have I
gone down to the cellar to j
bank the furnace for the
night: "Sometime I am going to make
this basement over!"
Probably what you had—and still
have—in mind was a recreation room,
that acme of convenience for the
suburban family, a room where ping
pong, billiards, bridge and chess can
be played, perhaps to the accompani
ment of iced drinks mixed at a built
in refreshment bar. But it seems
such a far cry from the cold, hard
cement floor and walls to gleaming
tiled floor and walls!
One of the things that makes an
unfinished basement loftk hopeless is
a drab cement floor. Somehow, most j
people think that it would take a j
great deal of time and even more
money to make that floor "trodable" j
or easy to step, moisture-proof and
good-looking. Actually, there is a ;
material on the market which is de
signed to be laid right over the cement
floor, that is in direct contact with
Mother Earth. It is an asphalt tile,
one of the most inexpensive floorings
you can purchase and one of the
cheapest and easiest to install.
We have been hearing a great deal
lately about the asphalt and asbestos
tile made by a company which has
specialized in flooring of this sort
sine 1899. It has been used for years
by architects for their big building
constructions, but now the company
feels the public ought to learn about
it—for playrooms, especially.
This tile is virtually indestructible.
The offices, stores, hotels, hospitals, I
schools and banks where it was in
stalled years ago show it in almost per
fect condition, although the feet ol
thousands have moved across it day
upon day, year upon year. Constant
scrubbing will not remove its smooth
gleaming surface, nor will it oxidize
or harden. Curling, buckling and
roughening are also out, according tc
its makers. It just resists traffic scars!
The tile is resilient, fire-resistan!
and impervious to the deteriorating
effects of dampness. And a special
boon for playrooms is its non-skid
quality—you know how annoying it h
to slip, just as you have whacked the
elusive little celluloid ball across i
green ping-pong table.
But all of these qualities are utilitar
ian, and there is as much to recom
mend this tile on the esthetic side.
We have seen the samples of colors,
ranging from cool greens, flecked with
black and white, to warm browns, reds
and carnelians, some marbleized, some
plain. Altogether there are 33 differ
ent colors, offering endless color
combinations.
Cove bases made of the same mate
rial are available for corners, to guard
against possible insanitary leaking or
mopping-up water around the edges
of the tile floor.
Do you want to know where you
can get prices and see samples? We
know. Write us.
* * * *
JT’S A little late in the year to be
painting your house, but you can
do it late when the weather is mild;
no scaffolding mars your house during
the peak of the week end visiting sea
son, and, of course, at this time of
year, there is less likelihood of flies
and other insects getting caught on
the wet paint.
If you haven’t purchased your paint
yet, consider well before you choose
top and bottom coats. The time has
gone by when you can use the same
kind of paint underneath any color
finish coat on the outside of a house.
In fact, you can’t do better than inves
tigate the tinted undercoats about
which we have been hearing so much.
They are made by a company which
is famous in the paint field for its con
tractual arrangements on house paint
ing. (The company actually makes
it possible for you to start without a
down payment and to pay for the Job
at as little as $5.75 a month for 18
months!)
The undercoats come tinted white
buff and gray, and are to be used a*
specified—the white under outsidt
white, the buff under ivory, cream
yellow, brown and red; the gray undei
gray, blue, green or black. The under
coat can effect the looks of the job
if you use the wrong base for the coloi
you want as a finish.
Made with non-penetrating oils, th<
I new undercoats are said to seal th<
; pores of the wood and the pores of th<
old paint surface as well, building a
good foundation for the top film.
* * * *
*‘tIOW are you fixed for winter?”
A "Oh, fine. I’ve got a new oil
burner.” •
This conversation was overheard by
the writer on top of a bus a few weeks
ago. It took place between two well
dressed, intelligent-appearing men,
who thought they had touched upon
a familiar and yet technical subject
with the greatest of comprehension.
Actually, we had all we could do to
keep from turning around and saying:
"Yes, but how's your burner’s com
bustion chamber?” We forbore because
we were quite sure the man with the
new oil burner would say, "What do
you mean?” and that would have
meant a long and possibly unwelcome
discussion.
But to you readers of this column
who have new and efficient oil burners,
may we make the speech—in print—
about the importance ol the unit
within which your Are burns so mer
rily? For the mo6t scientifically de
signed oil burner in the world won’t
deliver its utmost unless the combus
tion chamber has been made with
equal scientific exactitude, out of just
as up-to-date materials.
A combustion chamber should do
more than merely confine the flame
within itself. It should protect you
from loss of heat through its walls; its
angle and nbise resistance qualities |
should be high. Just a wall of fire
brick won’t do all that. It must be
properly designed and then it must
have insulation and acoustical ma
terial behind the walls.
It is particularly appropriate to
discuss this matter now that we have
discovered a new ready-made com
bustion chamber, which comes ready
to be installed, insulation and all.
After the burner has been set in posi
tion, the chamber is built from fitted
refactory slabs. Then processed ver
mlcullte fill is packed around the en
tire installation, filling the firebox to
the height of its chamber walls. This
vermiculite is the same as the ma
terial which is used to insulate the
floors of attics—those golden, exploded
nlca pellets which look like popcorn
kernels and actually are a first cousin
o Isinglass.
A sound deadening and leveling
coat of plastic material Is laid on the
floor of the firebox, as a sort of cushion
lor the whole Installation. Provision
is made for the insertion of the burner
gun, and the Joint is sealed with a
special bonding cement.
But complicated as all this sounds,
the entire Job can be laid in half an
hour, and not by an expert, neces
sarily. An apprentice can do it; you
can do it yourself.
N kn
' >\ ^
s Art Opportunity Seldom Offered in $
SHEPHERD PARK
1 *12,950 ;
^ ^ ^ ^ N
5 7542 Alaska Ave. N.W. $
5 $
! Certain conditions make it possible to buy this beautiful ' BREU- <
5 NINGER-BUILT" home, in perfect condition, at such a bargain price. $
5 Contains 7 rooms (4 bedrooms), 2 complete baths, fireplace, elab- ^
5 orate kitchen, electric refrigeration and new oil burner. A gorgeous ^
5 lot running through to another street and a garage. This home will $
$ be sold today. $
| 1515 Dlst. $
^ K St. N.W. 3100 $
S ^
^ _ REALTOR $;
ONLY I LEFT IN
KILMAROCK
^L'n I
108 ANNE STREET
Discriminating People Are Buying Rapidly
I in Kilmarock — the Distinctive Develop
ment of Moderately Priced Homes.
Price, $9,550
Built by Gregory B. Mason, Furnished by Hutchison, Inc.
i Open Daily and Sunday Until 9 P.M.
To Reach: Drive out 5th or 15th St. to Cedar St. (Takoma Park), turn
right on Cedar St. to Carroll Ave. and follow Carroll Ave. .1 blocks
I past Washington Sanitorium to Anne St. and Kilmarock signs.

I It- is hard to talk about these
Homes and be modest
at the same time
I
i
I
$5,850
One of five new brick homes that
feature construction details you
would only expect in expensive
houses. Six rooms—first floor has
large living room, two bedrooms,
kitchen, breakfast room and bath
Second floor nicely finished Pull
basement. Double oak doors, hot
vater heat, screens, electric re
frigeration. metal kitchen cabinets
Easy terms: pay less than rent. City
water and sewer gas and electricity.
Deal With Owner and Save
Sample Houte
4300 Dewey Ave. S.E.
Open Daily and Sunday
Until 9 P.M.
To inspect: Drive out Pennsylvania
Ave. S.E.. turn left on Alabama Ave.
to Beck St . nobt cm Beck to South
ern Ave . left on Southern Ave. to
Dewey Ave.
JOSEPH C. ZIRKLE
Owner— —Builder
!»07 15th St. N.W. District 8888
i I =
Loans for Refinancing
Also Construction Loans
Long Term
Monthly Payment Loans
and Straight
Three-Year Loans
which can be converted into monthly
payment loans at any time without
exDense.
EQUlTAEU
im INSURANCE
COMPANY
14fb St. Ml, 34J7
A NEW SOUTHERN
COLONIAL MANOR HOUSE
Corner of Bradley Boulevard & Hillmead Road
Bradley Hills Grove, Md.
IF YOU are looking for a home of charm with all modern equip
ment, here you will find it. The entry hall is 14x16, with a
graceful Colonial stairway; opening off of this reception hall is a
spacious living room, dining room with beautdul corner cupboards,
a paneled library with lavatory adioimng. The kitchen is equipped
with a complete General Electric unit kitchen, including dishwasher,
garbage-disposal unit, steel cabinets, refrigerator, range and venti
lating ton. The walls are tiled 4'6" high. There are six bedrooms,
three baths, besides a paneled recreation room and maid's room and
bath in the basement. The heating system is Chrysler's Airtempt
air-conditioned unit—oil-fired. There are spacious porches, a
large two-car garage attached with covered walkway The lot is
about 200 feet front by 340 feet deep. Bradley Hills Grove is
a restricted community of 350 acres-—all lots ore ’,2 acre or more.
A GENERAL @ELECTRIC
UNIT KITCHEN
Open Daily and Sunday
13/s ACRES—BEAUTIFUL TREES
* To reach the property drive went on Bradley Bnulerard
from Wisconsin Avenue .1 1 ID miles—drive in the driveway.
R. BATES WARREN
NAT. 9452 1108 16th WIS. 3159
Thii it an Electric Kitchen Health Home. Till) Hampden Lai
lv & /• • •
Ol V HOME
O GREATER pride can come to any man than the pride of
i^l home ownership. And there are no prouder home owners
than those who live in Greenwich Forest.
• Here, carved out of virgin woodland, is a community whose
picturesque charm stands unequaled in metropolitan Washing
ton. Just 20 motor minutes from the heart of the city, it is
fashionably secluded, quaintly rustic.
• Character is reflected in every detail of the commodious Wil
liamsburg Colonial home pictured. Designed for gracious liv
ing, it has been furnished for your inspection by Peerless and
decorated by Elizabeth Stanley Wilcox. Priced at $21,500, it has
four bedrooms, two baths upstairs. Living room, dining room,
den with bath on first floor. Basement recreation room, maid’s
quarters. Air-conditioned throughout.
• Also being exhibited in Greenwich Forest today are two other
dignified dwellings, one in the Early American motif, the other
executed in traditional English style. They await your inspection
today.
retnuiichfforcsb
A RESTRICTED COMMUNITY BY CAFR1TZ
• Tot Reach: Drive out Wliconein Ave. to Bethesda traffic
left to Wilton Lane, left to Hampden Lane and right to houtes.
14th & K Sts. N.W. District 9080
’ft 1 *
t -3
Trades Considered
Beautiful Dale Drive
Woodside Forest
• Paneled den
• 2-car built-in garage
• Lot 80 ft. frontage
• 1 st floor lavatory
• Maid's quarters in
basement
• Paneled recreation room

Also see Model Home at Dale
Drive and Midwood Road
furnished by Hilda Miller.
Carefree Comfort With Modern
(ias A ppliances
TO REACH Out I Uth St nr
Georgia A:e. to trnthc light in Sit
ver Spring. Right on Colesiille
Pike to Mrs K s Toll House Taiem,
left on Dale Drive to home.
FULTON R. GRUVER
Owner Builder
V/ople & James, Inc
8A23 Georgia A.» Si epherd 5200
Silver Spring Office
• HOMEWOOD • j
!» Bordering Massachusetts Ave. A\H\ i
;! A carefully restricted community offering all the S
«! advantages of intown with suburban quiet and S
<; comfort. Its natural beauty will appeal to you. j
* m ' ■ ^ .. 1 — .— ■ 1 "i *
4714 and 4722 Albemarle St. N.W. «•
Two fine Colonial homes that will satisfy the most discriminating |!
tastes. Delightful 3-bedroom. 2-bath homes with smart first-floor J[
den. Large rooms, ample closet space and combination house and <[
! 2 hot-water heating fc>y oil are among the many features. The kitchens 2
J will delight any housekeeper. Quality materials and construction 2
J assure a lifetime of satisfactory service. J
2 There are no better home values in Washington and vicinity than 2
2 Homewood Homes. 2
£ Built by Drv e nut Mass. Ate. to '4Uth S* . turn OPEN AND £
J right vast ShnpviriQ Center to Albemarle I IMI Tl I) J
J L. E. F. Prince St., then right to houses. DAILY ^
1 C. H. HILLEGE1ST CO. \
2 1621 K St. N.W. NAtl. 8500 2
| I !©
A SILVER STAR MODEL HOME J
in 1
ji
g
s
|1
- --,— g
I 116 Woodlawn Avenue |
p We wish to take this opportunity to thank the thousands of visitors who gf
p have viewed the Kenwood Silver Star Home for their enthusiastic and kind If
p expressions of approval. Typical of those expressions are the following:
jl "A combination of hominess "With a large living room and ||
£ and dignity rarely found. dining room to the south, an j§|
I "So unusual to find six bed- abundance of sunlight is as- |
p rooms and every one of them sured all day long. Ef
I1^ a large, usable room." ,,T, . , . if
a ' The circular staircase gives ra
"Every room in the house is a charming effect." ||
well planned—so much wall
space." "The huge trees on this spa- if
"I never expected to find a cious lot certainly give ^the
home with thirteen large home a delightful setting."
cedar-lined closets above the , gf
first floor. A woman must A nappy combination of the |i
have had something to do with practical and the artistic. ||
its planning " Congratulations!" ||
| "I notice you have cross-venti- "|t js entire!y and delightfully 1
Mlation in every room in the . , .. m
. „ y different from anything we
house. , „ m
have seen.
"It is apparent to any one that j3j
the home is splendidly built." "A perfect home." j|
We could go on and on with these comments. However, we will just say that 5/
if you have not been among those who have enjoyed viewing the Kenwood Silver g
Star Home, do not let anything deprive you of this treat over the week end. g
j£ Pictures by Courtesy of Venable gf
% 10 AM. to 9 PM. Sat- Completely
I ttrday and Sunday, Furnished by
'f 10 to 6 P.M. Daily Hutchison s, Inc.
\ lfeiffleJq-CtiamWin Development Co. 1
KENWOOD OFFICE: KENNEDY DRIVE AND CHAMBERLIN AVE.
\ Wisconsin 4425
I To reach Kenwood, drive out Connecticut Avenue to Chevy Chase Circle, west on Grafton g
Street, through Somerset to Kenwood, or out Wisconsin Avenue to Dorset Avenue, west on ||
| Dorset Avenue through Somerset to Kenwood, or out Connecticut or Wisconsin Avenue to Kj
| Bradley Lane and west on Bradley Lane to Kenwood.

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