OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 02, 1937, Image 11

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1937-12-02/ed-1/seq-11/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-11

CHANGE NOT MAIN
FACTOR IN CRASHES
Highway Research Expert
Says Survey Scouts
Popular Theory.
Chance does not govern a majority
of automobile crashes, as is popularly
believed, H. M. Johnson of the High
way Research Board told the 17th
annual meeting of that group today
in reporting on “Detection of Acci
dent-Prone Drivers.”
A study based on the accident his
tories of 29,531 Connecticut drivers,
•elected at random and each of them
licensed for at least six years, showed
that reported accidents were not dis
tributed among these drivers accord
ing to the laws of chance, and that
the discrepancy between fact and
chance-expectation cannot be attrib
uted to chance.
The drivers whose records were
•xamined. Mr. Johnson said, had an
average of .04 accidents a year, which
corresponds to an average of one ac
cident among 25 drivers in one year.
The contribution of accideni-repeaters
to the total number of mishaps was
quite large, and far in excess of what
the laws of chance permit.
In fact, the speaker said, a group of ,
less than 4 per cent of the operators
had 40 per cent of the fatal accidents,
36 per cent of the non-fatal. personal
injury accidents and 38 per cent of
the accidents which involved no per
sonal injuries.
Drivers younger than 21, the study
revealed, had a disproportionate share
of all classes of accidents. Their fatal
accident rate was nearly twice the
average and their non-fatal rate about
on* and one-half times the average.
—" ■ ■ »
Shanghai
< Continued From First Page.)
to decide locally and would be re
ferred to Paris.
Some 8,000 troops, including infan
try. cavalry and artillery, will partici
pate in tomorrow's demonstration,
with Japanese airplanes flying over
head.
A nigh American official expressed
grave concern the parade might pro
voke incidents in the foreign com
munities, saying: "If the Chinese fire
a shot, God knows what will happen
“To hold a procession at this deli
cate juncture is to invite a disaster
for which International Settlement
authorities cannot be responsible."
Brig. Gen. John C. Beaumont,
United States marine commander at
Shanghai, and Maj. Gen. Telfer
Smollett twice have protested against
the parade.
Col. Andreini, commander of the
Italian Grenadiers, joined in the first
protest last Monday, after the Jap
anese formally notified settlement
authorities of their intention to pa- :
rade. The colonel, however, did not J
Woosung Reported Raided.
Foreign naval officers said Chinese
bombers raided the Japanese airfield
at Woosung. down the Whangpoo
River from Shanghai. Japanese de- 1
dined to comment on the report.
Twenty new twin-engined bombers
arrived at Hanlcow, 300 miles up the |
Yangtze River from Nanking, -and i
were being tuned up by Chinese pilots, j
well informed and reliable foreigners I
reported. The remainder of the fleet
of 300 Soviet-built craft were said ;
to be either at Sian, 400 miles north i
and west of Hankow, or on their way
from Russia.
Explaining the Japanese air victory
at Nanking, the Japanese spokesman
said a Japanese squadron arrived at
the city just as Chinese planes were
about to take off. Thirty of the
Soviet-built planes rose to fight the
Japanese and 10 were shot down. He
said there other Chinese fell victims
, of Japanese fire as they attempted
to flee from the airdrome.
On the Yangtze Delta battleground
Japanese fought their way toward ob
jectives where groups of American
residents were believed to be in danger.
Heavy Japanese bombers showered
projectiles ahead of infantry units
driving toward Nanking and Wuhu,
Yangtze River port 60 miles southwest
of the almost-deserted Chinese cap
ital. Another Japanese column was
aimed at Mankchow, Chekiang Prov
ince seaport to the south.
Dr. R. E. Brown of Ann Arbor,
Mich., forw’arded to Japanese au
thorities the appeal of 24 Americans
and several other foreigners that a
neutral zone be established at Wuhu.
Japanese authorities refused today
to grant the plea for a neutral zone
at Nanking. Through Father Jas
quinot, French priest who obtained
establishment of a Shanghai safety
zone during warfare there, the Jap
anese informed the committee that:'
"The Japanese Army can not assume
responsibility in the event that Chinese
forces misbehave toward civilians or
property in Nanking, but as far as
consistent with military necessity the
Japanese Army will endeavor to re
spect the residential area outlined by
Nanking’s international group.”
The committee continued organiza
tion of the residential area they had
asked to be set aside as a refuge for
the 250,000 civilians remaining here.
SKIRMISHES ARE FOUGHT
ON TWO SPANISH FRONTS
By the Associated Press.
HENDAYE, Franco-Spanish Fron
tier, Dec. 2.—Spanish troops, govem
r-1 ■
ment and insurgent, fought a series
of localized, indecisive battles today
on the Aragon and Teruel fronts.
Reports from both sides said the skir
mishing resulted in little change in
positions. Artillerymen Joined in the
fray.
Government sources declared the
insurgent-held town of Sabinanigo,
in Northern Aragon, had been in
darkness the last two nights, leading
to a belief that the Electric power
plant supplying a large area of the
Oallego River Valley had been dam
aged by Catalan gunners.
Earlier government reports said
Insurgents on the Toledo front, south
west of Madrid, had lost heavily In
five futile attacks on government
positions.
MRS. COVINGTON RITES
Funeral services for Mrs. Virginia
Covington, 28, who died Tuesday at
San Antonio, Tex., will be held at
10 a m. Saturday in Fort Myer Chapel.
Burial will be In Arlington National
Cemetery.
Mrs. Covington was the wife of First
Lt. John C. Covington, stationed at
Kelly Field, Tex., and the daughter
of Col. E. R. W. McCabe, assistant
chief of staff of the military intelll
genee section of the War Department
general staff here.
| —-*■
An Englishman can come aero*
whole sentences occasionally in Amer<
lean papers which are completely uifc
Intelligible to him.
$4 I jB^QM880&
/the best\
I Georges Cod and Maine 1
■ potatoes, blended, seasoned I
1 and flavor-sealed in processed K
I cans. The original, quality I
I product. Just shape and fry. I
\ CDEC with label of any Gor- m
■A rnsS ton product, mw, 40 M
J\ paye. color-illustrated recipe /
V book. Send to Gorton-Pew J
X Fisheries, Gloucester, ^
Massachusetts.
p.. a_-_.^a_^ A. A A Aw
V
A A
Torn to TEA 1
McCormick's Mib. 1
BANQUETTEA pkf ZDC **'■*T3c |
World-Famous w n>. H«b. 1
UPTON S TEA.pkf Z3C pk‘ *T3C I
Orange Pekoe and Pekoe vA |b. a Q 1> lb. ^ ^ -
WilkllMTEA. " 18* - 35c |
Red Label \lb- 1
SALADA TEA_«C I
I
That* Price* Effective in Wathington and Vicinity Until Clote at |
Butinete Saturday, December 4th, 1937 \
I NO WALK
i NO WAIT 4
I NO WORK jj
—when you order by telephone!
Just phone your order ond your
needswill be DELIVERED FREE! —
To Locate blearest 1
D. fi. S. Store—Just Call
|
RITTER Oi6oz.^^c
Cooked Spaghetti - " cans i ^
Ritter Tomato Juice_ _H gal. hot. 31c
Chef Boy-Ar-Dee Spaghetti Dinner_pkg. 33c
Beardsley's Shredded Codfish_pkg. 14c
L'ART FRESH mioz.
Cucumber Pickles - i°r * Mm
| I I I I M tM IUM MIUIIIIII milUIIMIIIi i II..
DUFF'S
CAKE MIXES_
Ginger Bread, Devil’a Food, Spice or White Cake
Sunshine Butter Bings_h». Pkf. 21c
Sunshine Butter Smacks_7 o*. pk*. 10c
N. B. C. Graham Crackers_ib. Pkf. 19c
FOR “GINGERBREAD DE LUXE”
BETTY CROCKER’S NEWEST RECIPE IN SACKS OF
GOLD MEDAL ss FLOUR^ 27c
I
Fresh Loin
PORK ROAST - - -11 Z «J C
Whole or Half Loin
Tender and Juicy
CHUCK ROAST -11 Z jc
I D.G.S. SUGAR-CURED, SHORT SHANK
SMOKED HAMS - 1Ztc j
G' G. S. JELKE'S II D- G. S.
ICAIKArr GOOD LUCK Grade No. 1
SAUSAGE Margarine SL|CED
MEAT & 20e BAC0N
lb. ^ "TC (On Salt in Lictmtd Stortt ^
pkg. Mm I IL °">y> lb. jy
Brandywine i. Sunshade ,, yf3- !
SLICED BACON'_b’ ROLL BUTTER_b* 43C [
WEBCO SCRAPPLE..1^ 17c CREAMERY BUTERlb‘ 47C
COOKED^HOMINYpkg* 10c SE*LE?TED EGGS-doz- 37c
Fresh (Not Frozen) ■■■■ ■ ■ - - FRESH
HADDOCK "sunshade" OYSTERS
FILLETS EGGs j&t?55c
^ U. s. Standards 4 ^*r Selects
">• ZI toJTSZi. ,d°z- *0 c per. 35c <”•" 69c
McCORMICK'S BEE BRAND
VANILLA
EXTRACT
The pure extract in the easy-grip, non-slip bottle.
- -■
U. S. No. 1 JUICY and DELICIOUS
APPLES
STAYMANS, jm g* JM I
Grimes Golden MM ^M MM m |
I York Imperials lbs. I |
From the or Black Twigs I
Appalachian Area m
Sweet Red « . E* Juicy •. ;
EMPEROR GRAPES 3 25c FLORIDA ORANGES. d0‘ 23c
OANJOU PEARS-3 lb8, 25c GRAPEFRUIT.3for14e;3f®r19e
Fancy Round
STRINGLESS
GREEN BEANS.
ae.2hds- 17c I
.1K4c
is i?o.si - - - 10"*• 19c
Fancy California |
H GREEN PEAS
I pods ■■ £ I
and M it M I
| '■ ^^g
f - ' -
DELICIOUS ^ -
Gold Bag Coffee lb- A- j
Shurfine Coffee.lb 25c
Wilkin* Coffee-“> 29c I
ROCK CREEK ,9. _ - f
Ginger Ale- <£*,>25
Palm or Golden Ginger Ale, Lime and Lithia, Sparkling Water
. II rMMMfTTT^xvocvvc>xxxxx>i
TRU-BLU «* bot, ^ Ec
Beer or Ale-^ (contsJ A J
ARROW to^Ec
BEER.*# (conts.) ^0 I
NEW YORKER M boh. ^ Ec
BEER.** (conts.) J/gg ^0 I
Beer in Moat D. C. Stores
Prices Slightly Higher in Md. and Va. Stores
1 ‘ 1
BORAX SOAP.4cT«19e
palmouVe" soap*. 4 25e
RED OR BLUE BOX
SUPER SUDS.
NEW OVERSIZE PACKAGE
SILVER DUST_
OCTAGON
PRODUCTS
UujKhy 4^. 19c
_2 — 9c
Powder or J for g
Cleamcr_
M. P. C.
KSL_4~17e
T°r.'h-_--3 ,,u,25c
Cleanser._2 — 9C
w«Sw*«2'kw-19c
6 BEAUTIFUL
French Fold
? Christmas Cards
With Enrelenee «• Match
For | A_ end a
Only ■ vV Label From
BAB-0
The Greece Dircolrinr Cleencer
2c«*2Bc
CHIPSO FLAKES X 9« ft 21C i
IVORYFLAKEs2Xl9cft22c
I
Multipli^aOOrima.inSaJ, ,m. Q Ige. ^ *
OXYDOL.pi's- /C pkg.
_ ^
7*A« Somp of Baautiful Woman. m ■ A *
CAMAY SOAP -... -3 cake* 19e?

xml | txt