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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 02, 1937, Image 18

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Thunder of Anderson
Missing in Fantasy
**The Star Wagon” Is Clever
And Wistful—Meredith
Cast in New Type.
By JAY CARMODY.
NEW YORK, Dec. 2.—It is absurd to want to type playwrights, but you
discover that you want to do just that when you see ‘"Rie Star Wagon,"
Maxwell Anderson’s chore for drama lovers this year. However un
reasonable as it may be, which is quite a lot of unreasonable, one ex
pects thunder and lightning from Anderson. One does not get it in this play.
It Is fantasy on the good-humored side, and although it is pleasant and comic
... 14 J... ...» ...14. lib. .*.__
Maxwell Anderson. One is more dis
concerted than disappointed, however,
for1 "The Star Wagon” could never be
rated as a disappointment.
Three good reasons for not dwelling
excessively on the shock of a lionlike
Anderson turning lamb on this occa
sion are Burgess Meredith, Lillian
Gish and Russell Collins. These three
players, plus a production that lends
nice reality to the playwright’s trick
at turning back the pages of time,
make ‘'The Star Wagon” a completely
beguiling experience in the theater.
Without them and the artful staging
one suspects that Anderson’s whim
sical drama would be too far on the
inconsequential side to merit the fine
reception it has had. And undoubtedly
will continue to have until so late in
the spring that it never will get to
Washington this season. (It is at the
Empire, in case you want to put it
o» your list of things to see in New
York.)
* * * * *
•The Star Wagon” serves not mere
ly to introduce Anderson in the guise
of the late Sir James Barrie, but offers
an even more startling version of
Meredith.
The man who is rated as the best
Of the younger American actors ap
pears in the beginning and end of
"The Star Wagon” as an elderly in
ventor. In the middle of the drama,
through the aegis of one of his inven
tions, a kind of H. G. Wells time ma
chine, every one in the cast goes back
to the days of his youth. The purpose
of it all is not merely to show how old
people are made but to demonstrate
Anderson's thesis that if we had it all
to do over again, it would be precisely
the same.
The tale which adorns the play’s
mofral starts with a discussion between
the elderly Minches (Meredith and
Miss Gish) of how perhaps it would
have been better if each had married
some one else. Mr. Minch is a drab
little mouse whose inventions make
other people rich and his wife angry.
She cannot see wiw he‘should not
have profited more by his genius and
provided her with greater comfort in
the world.
After this point is made, Anderson
tosses in the time machine and every
one in the cast becomes young again
and we see just how it all happened to
work out the way it did—and why it
always would work out that way. It is
very sweet, let us tell you.
* * * *
Mr. Anderson has peopled his play
with as pleasant a group of characters
as you can find on Broadway this
season. The Minches, Stephen and
Martha (which is something like
genius in naming characters), are a
completely winning couple. In their
aged sequences, they quarrel without
quarreling and when they are young,
they love without loving—two persons
possessed of an alikeness that could
not have failed to bring them together
and keep them together. Meredith
and Miss Gish, she who was Opehlia
last year, play the parts with obvious
gratitude to Anderson for having cre
ated them. (The parts, of course.)
Then there is Hanus Wicks, played
by Russell Collins. Hanus is a man of
magnificent loyalty, not merely to his
friend Minch, but to his own high
standard of honesty, forthrightness
and truth. It would be a foul not to
like Hanus, a confession of a serious
lack of character and undoubtedly an
insult to Anderson. Mildred Natwick
turns in a nice performance in the role
of a choir mistress who spends her
time talking pretty fast so she won't
have time to think of the wrong things
in this world. The others, ranging
from thugs to captains of industry
(how Anderson can get all those
people together and make it plausible
is one of the marvels of the age), are
played convincingly.
"The Star Wagon” is not great
drama, but it is good entertainment
and it is staged so clevely that you
don’t feel at all silly when that time
machine starts buzzing and every one
is transported back to the days of
youth.
I
.Where and When
_
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—"Richard II,” Maurice
Evans’ famed characterization of
Shakespeare’s king who was too much
a dreamer: 8:30 p.m.
Palace—“The Firefly,” Jeanette
MacDonald in the Friml operetta: 11
aSh., 1:35, 4:15, 6:55 and 9:35 p.m.
Keith’s—“Stage Door,” Hepburn,
Rogers, a story of Broadway called
better than that of the play: 11:15
a.m., 1:21, 3:27, 5:37, 7:39 and
9:45 p.m.
Capitol—“Second Honeymoon,” ro
mance in two doses: 10:30 a.m., 12:55,
3:20, 5:45, 8:10 and 10:35 p.m. Stage
•hows: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:50, 7:15 and
9:40 p.m.
Earle—“I’ll Take Romance,” Grace
Moores singing: II a.m., 1:40, 4:25,
7:10 and 9:55 p.m. Stage shows: 1,
1:45, 6:30 and 9:15.
Metropolitan — “Alcatraz Island,”
drama against a backdrop of prison
bars and walls: 11:55 a.m., 2, 4, 5:55,
7:55, 9:50 p.m.
Columbia—“Conquest,” Garbo and
Boyer in Napoleon's love story: 11:55
Mi., 2:20, 4:45, 7:10 and 9:35 p.m.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts. Show
runs 1 hour and 15 minutes continu
ously from 10 a.m. to midnight.
Little—“The Lower Depths,” mov
ing film version of the Maxim Gorki
play: 11:35 a.m.. 1:35, 3:35, 5:35,
7:40 and 9:40 p.m.
Ambassador—“Breakfast for Two,”
love with fisticuffs: 6:15, 8:05 and 9:55
P-fL
Penn—“High, Wide and Handsome,”
Irene Dunne in adventurous ro
mance: 2, 3:55, 5:50, 7:45 and 9:45 p.m.
Sheridan—“The Bride Wore Red,”
Tone and Young loving Crawford:
1:35, 4:50, 7:10 and 9:30 p.m.
Uptown—"High, Wide and Hand
some”: 2:30, 4:50, 7:10 and 9:30 p.m.
Tivoli—“High, Wide and Hand
some”: 2:30, 4:50, 7:10 and 9:30 p.m.
Howard—“West of Shanghai,” a
Boris Karloff thriller: 12:30, 3:55,
7:t)5 and* 10:10 p.m. Stage shows:
2:30, 5:50 and 9:10 p.m.
Bradshaw Back.
^J'lNY BRADSHAW, known as “The
Clown Prince of Jazz,” headlines
the stage show to be presented at
the Howard Theater beginning tomor
row. Bradshaw brings a new swing
bond and a supporting cast which in
chides the Four Box Brothers, Flash
and Lovey Lane, Toy and Wing, Chink
OBllins. David, Goliath and Whytte
and Tip, Tap and Toe, offering a
rhythm revue.
“Back in Circulation,” with Pat
O’Brien, Joan Blondell and Margaret
Undsay, is the screen feature. Re
served seats are the rule at the Satur
day midnight show.
Barrymore to Sing
In His Latest.
JOHN BARRYMORE'S singing voice
now has been recorded for the
screen for the first time. The song
will be used in a scene in Paramount’s
“Romance in the Dark," in which
Barrymore is co-starred with Gladys
Swarthout and John Boles.
Barrymore was asked for a vocal
contribution by H. C. Potter, director
of the picture. The actor volunteered
to sing a piece from Faust. Potter
demurred. Barrymore retired to a
corner for five minutes, composed his
own music, and, returning, sang the
song. Miss Swarthout described his
voice as a combination “trombone
and base drum tremolo."
GAYETY BIRLESK
**+++**+*+****1,***+**+**
JACK (Floojle) DIAMOND
AND Rig BUBLESKEBg
GUEST STAR
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CORIO
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NA. SIM
...N9w.—FIRST RU-N SHOWING
A” Continent
81 *P M11 y^^11 A M- *• 11 FM
PLAY BOYS OF
THE JUNGLE
Not a Sex Film
Entertainment for
The Entire Family
Etc. 400 Setts at 40c.
Mat. 400 Seati at 25c
~
Film Society
Shows Three
Relics
“Westerns” Treated
As Program
Proceeds.
THE “Western" motion picture
was treated in most satisfy
ing fashion last evening at
the Rialto Theater, when the
second program in the aeries arranged
by the Film Society of Washington
was presented. In the three offer
ings shown the contribution of this
type of celluloid effort to the devel
opment of the American cinema was
demonstrated cletfrly. Panoramic
“long shots” were necessary, of course,
from the outset in order that the ex
panse of outdoor drama might be
projected. The alteration of such
long-range filming with close-ups fur
nished a technical problem. The
problem was met, and motion pictures
progressed.
Produced in 1923, “The Covered
Wagon” was an “epic” of its cine
matographic period. To view it once
again, 14 years later, is to laugh a
bit, dwell upon the development of
Hollywood art since, and yet withal
to recognize its merit even when to
day’s standards are considered. “The
Covered Wagon” was directed ably by
James Cruze, with fast mass action
views suffering little by comparison
with “modern” efforts in the same
line. Names that have passed from
cast “frames”—J. Warren Kerrigan,
Lois Wilson, Charles Ogle, Tully Mar
shall, Johnny Fox, Guy Oliver. But
a face of some familiarity even to the
youngest generation of movie goers—
Alan Hale.
The other two features seen last
night were equally entertaining, equal
ly important in the march of screen
art. “The Great Train Robbery,”
starring “Broncho Billy” Anderson,
was filmed in 1905 ana called the
first motion picture with a plot. The
picture is a very short one, to be
sure, but it packs more thrills in
proportion to footage than many a
modern blood-and-thunder saga. “The
Last Card,” a 1911 release, was the
first of the "Westerns,” as they are
known today—good men, bad men
and love. William S. Hart, long-time
top magnitude star of such produc
tions, starred in this one, and Louise
Glaum, Margaret Thompson, Her
schell Mayall and Gordon Mullen were
NATIONAL THEATRE
Thurs. Aft.. 4:30. Dec. 0
William A. Albauah Oilers
SHAN-KAR
HINDU BALLET
(NEW PROGRAM)
BEATS SI.10 to S3.30. ON SALE AT
Box Office & Worch’a, 1110 G St.
in the supporting cut. Not much
in the way of pounding hoofs or
particularly furious gun play, but they
came in full measure soon afterward.
O. A. M.
Conducting Is Done
By Conductors.
rJ'HE Hollywood habit of casting ac
tors u orchestra leaders in theater
sequences on the screen, wu found
impractical in Grace Moore’s latest
Columbia picture, “I’ll Take Ro
mance,” which soon is to be released.
Such actors photograph well, but
usually lack the musical technique
necessary to look convincing on a
conductor’s podium.
As a result, Director Edward H.
Griffith selected three actual and
well-known conductors to handle the
baton in Miss Moore’s newest produc
tion, and all three appear in the lav
ish stage sequences leading a 125
plece orchestra.
They are Genaro Curcl, former
opera singer, voice coach, and brother
in-law of the great Galll-Curcl; Isaac
Van Grove, former conductor of the
Chicago Grand Opera Company and
personal friend of Miss Moore, and
Mischa Bakaleinikoff, composer-con
ductor.
Peters Sisters Eat
To Stay Heavy.
rPHE Peters Sisters, 685 pounds of
1 singing, trucking rotundness, went
on a specially prepared diet last week
to insure that their arduous movie
work wouldn't reflect on this avoir
dupois.
The sepia songstresses, who made
a hit in the Eddie Cantor starring
picture, “All Baba Goes to Town," and
were signed to long-term agreements
by 20th Century-Fox, are required
by their contracts to keep their total
weight above the 660 mark,
7 i
is nothing short of Inspired . . .
electric ...” Mabelle Jennings.
Herald.
MAURICE EVANS
KING RICHARDS
Eves., $1.10 to $3.30; Wed. Mat.,
85e-$2.20. Sat. Mat., 85c-$2.75
Week Beg. Next Mon. JSSSJ
Messrs. Shubert Present
THE LONDON SUCCESS
(Prior to New York)
“LOVE OF WOMEN”
By Aimee and Philip Stuart
—With—
HEATHER VALERIE HUGH
ANGEL • TAYLOR • SINCLAIR
LEO 0. CARROLL
And Other Distinguished Players
Seat Sale Now!
Prices: Eves., $2.75. $2.20. $1.65.
$1.10. 55c. BARGAIN MATS., Wed.
an^atj^gc^LlOJUgOJneljB*.
Band to Be Heard.
rPHE Boys' Harmonica Band of the
Fifth Precinct Boys' Club will be
the guest of the Junior Cinema Ouild
Saturday morning at the Rialto Thea
ter. Members of the organisation,
ranging from 10 to 14 years fn age,
are to present a program of music
before “Stormy” is shown on the
screen.
Dennis O’Keefe spent his first day
off from work on "Bad Man of Brim
stone” enjoying a busman’s holiday
and watching his fellow players at
work on the set.
Claire and Brian
Are Stars Now.
/■'JLAERB TREVOR and Brian Don
levy, featured players at 20th
Century-Pox studios, are to be ele
vated to stardom in their next picture.
Two One-Acters.
rJ,HE Lansburgh Playmajcers will J
present two ene-act plays tomor
row night in St» Paul’s Auditorium,
Fifteenth and V streets N.W. Curtain
time has been set at 1:30. “
\
HELD OVER!i
2nd WEEK OF GLORIOUS ROMANCE! !
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ICADEMY jr*’1*
E. Lawrence Phillips' Theatre Beautiful
Continuous Prom 4:30 F.M.
ROBERT MONTGOMERY and
ROSALIND RUSSELL In
“NIGHT MUST FALL.”
THE SHADOW STRIKES,’
mh ROD LA ROCCIUE. LYNN ANDERI
'ARGUNA 11th *‘n; C An. S.l
Air-Conditioned
EVERYBODY DANCE" and THE OIR
PROM SCOTLAND YARD."_
•IDri IT Home of Mirrophenle Bonn
’'.Vr, Penna. Are. at 21st 8t.
_Matinees Ties., Thors., Sat., Ron.
HIRLEY TEMPLE. JEAN HER8HOLT 1
HEIDI." Comedy. News.
HJMBARTON
To|f^_SCDl TRACY 1
'AIR I AWN ANACOSTIA. D. C.
_Air-Conditioned
°«EfHINT HUTCHINSON In "TH
WOMEN MEN MARRY,”_
JDO 3227 M St. N.W.
Y VAN DYKE Novel. "TRADER HORN
Mickey Mouse Cartoon. News.
ITTI F MS Bth St. N.W.
“1* __Air-Conditioned
“THE LOWER DEPTHS.”
'RINfFV 11 IB H St. N.E. —
_ Double Feature.
IPENCER TRACY In "BIG CITY. ROl
BRT WILCOX In "THE MAN IN BLUE
[Fm S244 Georrla Ave.
IE.IU Silver Rorlns. Md.
Continuous Prom «:00 P.M.
“VARSITY SHOW,”
DICK POWELL FRED WARING and
PENNSYLVANIANS.
ITANTON 6th and~C Sts. N.E.
1 I lift Finest Round Eooipmei
Continuous From 5:30 P.M.
Double Feature
tiirrr nv-»TT a wvm — —... ..
■lujuuiIT xi/lii l JDVJI,
_ _ Starring SABU.
“TOO MANY WIVES,”
_With ANNE 8HIRLEY_
'A If AM A and Butternut-St
AnvIVlA _ No Parking Troubles
EARNER BAXTER and JOAN BENNETT
_“VOGUES OF 1938.”
HIPPODROME
Double Feature.
Richard Young In “The Man W>
Could Work Miracles” Vict<
_Moore in “Meet The Missus.”
- CAMEO MT M
O Today-Tomor.
3 SPENCER TRACY and
J LUISE RAINER in
an “BIG CITY.”
U Apr a nr hyattsvilul mi
P AltlRUL Hyatts. 3*5
gf Today-Tomor.
9 Warner Baxter Joan Bennett I
^ "Vogues of 1838."_
° RICHMOND AL*xA™K;2Aa v
2 Today
O Jack Haley. "Danger. Love at Work
BprCn ALEXANDRIA. VA
RtEU Ale*. 3415
O Today-Tomor.-Sat.
3 EDDIE CANTOR in “AL
S BABA GOES TO TOWN.
b Free Parking Space—800 Cars.
3 Mil A ROCKVILLE, MD
WIIL.U Rockville 191
Today-Tomor.
PAUL MUNI in
“LIFE OF EMILE ZOLA.
__Free Parking.__
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
TATE N<worr?esG LEI
ERROL FLYNN, ■ DEANNA DURBIN
OAN BLOND ELL in I in
"THE PERFECT I "108 MEN AND
SPECIMEN.” | A GIRL."
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AMBASSADOR JS*
BAM A RRH AT ?T,AN.'^?,<iK HERBERT
££59!1A*f in "BREAKFAST FOR
_TWO. _March of Time.
Apollo _«**■■*. ».*.—
pun wVrn Phene Line. 3378
•THE LIFE OF
_-EMILE AOLA. Short 8ublect.
AVALON •“SiSSEi/aJ”9
CON8TA‘Nce'^Smte1" Demand
!®S*5 - ‘n8dhorCtART
AVENUE GRAND W.lt AK
®abJectfUR*
CALVFRT 232i, Wiseensln Ate.
VAIilLIVl Cleveland *348
_ Matinee, 2:00 F.M.
JO*£CRA.WroKD and FRANCHOT
TONE In "BRIDE WORE RED."
Also March of nme. News.
CENTR A I 15® 9tTstTicw7*
LLHIRAL Phone Met. *841
Ovens 11:00 A.M
*NpiSV?^_iih;°i'ho??7CH A
COLONY 493\£:
pAUL MUNI to “THE LIFE OF
_ EMILE ZOLA. Short Subjects.
HOME “’V.V*
JOSEPHINE HUTCHINSON In
_"WOMEN MEN MARRY."_Short..
PFNN *®° Avenue 8.E.
1 Cllil Lincoln 2178
__Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
IRENE DUNNE. RANDOLPH SCOTT
In "HIGH. WIDE AND HAND
_SOME." Also Pete Smith Short.
CAVflY 3030 14th St. N.W.
, 1 _ Phone Cel. 4968
LYNNE OVERMAN. R06C0E EARNS
_ in "PARTNERS IN CRIME."
SHERIDAN gf tfPAMS
JOAN CRAWFORD andP'FRANCHOT
TONE ln_' 'BRIDE WORE RED. ”
Tivni I llth St. * Park Rd. N.W.
11V Vila! Phone Cel. 1800
_ Matinee, 2:00 P.M.
IRENE DUNNE. RANDOLPH SCOTT
In "HIGH. WIDE AND HAND
QAUC • ’ ilrn _■ at._..
UPTOWN Newark ASt*' N.W.
Phone Clereland MOO.
„ Matitnee. -J:0O P.M.
IRENE DUNNE. RANDOLPH SCOTT
in "HIGH. WIDE AND HAND
SOME.” Also 8hort Subjects.
YORK G». Am. and Quebec
A v/IVIY Place N.W.» Cel. 4BIA
NINO MARTINI. JOAN TONTAINZ
in “MUSIC FOR MADAME.”
NEWTON 12thslVdN^wUB
“EMILE ZOLA,”
PAUL MUNI.
JESSE THEATERrB%.W'
“Life Begins in College,”
RITZ BROTHERS. GLORIA STUART.
SYLVAN We1
Double or Nothing,”
BING CROSBY. MARTHA _RAYE
PALM THEATER bELvi!;ATr
“EMILE ZOLA,” '
PAUL MUNI.
ARLINGTON, VA
CftN 1130 Wilson Bird.
_ Odd. Colonial Villaie
LEY TEMPLE and JEAN HERSHOLT
•HEIDI.”
ITON Clarendon. Va.
Jt "r yourS.^ 111
TE-BETHESDA 7SL& mV:
CLAUDE RAINS in
HEY WON’T FORGET.”
NEWS and COMEDY.
BIG HOLLYWOOD PREMIERE IN FRONT OF THEATRE-FRIDAY NITE AT 8:30
#oo?$! w#ooP$ l you'n 90U With
They’re rolling your way! Bill and Myrna! Those
happy "Thin Man” funsters! Those lovable zanies!
— • They’re madder than ever! What a scream! What
monkey-shines! What joy!...Myrna saves her sister
l fr°m charming wastrel Bill — and gets bitten by the
TO love-bug herself!... Get on the band-wagon! Take a
ride with the groom and bride! It’s fun!
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