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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 02, 1937, Image 19

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1937-12-02/ed-1/seq-19/

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“Ballet Caravan” Scores
In Debut Here
American Performers Stimulate
Hopes for Future of
Native Ballet.
By ROBLRT B. PHILLIPS, Jr.
IH AMERICA there is no state school of the dance comparable to Institutes
fostered by continental nations. Yet If we may speak prophetically of the
performance given last night by the Ballet Caravan at Roosevelt wigh
School, It is not rash to predict that from the labors of the young artists
in this company and their associates In the American School of the Ballet in
New York there will emerge some day a corps of dancers dedicated to Amer
ican forms, purpoeeful In adantinff the*
classic modes of tcrpischore to native
themes.
Last night’s aeries of three brief bal
lets brought "Caravan” to Washington
for the first time. An audience of 700
witnessed the debut, and agreed there
after that in the future possibly 10
times that many persons will turn out
here to watch the work of this inter
esting, skillful and potentially great
troupe.
For their Initial appearance the
ladies and gentlemen of Lincoln Kir
in's company arranged a program
of mixed classical and modern themes.
The best of these, however, was the
topical "Yankee Clipper” ballet-voy
age, exemplary of many another na
tive piece already perfected in the
school s repertoire, and clearly indica
tive of future success in depicting
Americana via the dance.
Even in the classic "Promenade,” a
rather cold turkey based on music by
Maurice Ravel, and in the lively,
charming "Encounter,” which had a
Mozart score as its foundation, the
Ballet Caravan adhered to interpreta
tions, gestures, modes of thought
clearly comprehensible to the Amer
ican public. “Yankee Clipper” not
only followed this principle, but drew
its thesis from a native tradition, en
riched the story with a variety of na
tive dances encountered by the hero
protagonist, a young sailor making his
first voyage around the world.
In costuming, direction and chore
ography this assembly of youngsters
displayed great resourcefulness. They
were accompanied solely by the ex
cellent piano of Trude Rittmann, a
mild substitute for a full orchestra
tion, yet they worked so hard that all
attention was properly focused on the
dancing, which is, after all, the aim
and the end of a ballet score.
♦ * * *
J5ERHAPS the questionable value of
“Promenade” is inherent in its
lack of a central character or an ob
vious intent (this comes under the
heading of the confessions of an ama
teur dance critic). In the other two
pieces the spotlight was unwaver
ingly pointed at a character who em
bodied and unfolded the motif. “Yan
kee Clipper,” for example, had Eugene
Loring in the role of the wandering
seaman, and his controlled dancing
and vivid histrionics supplied much of
the value of the tale. Mr. Loring also
is credited with the choreography in
this presentation, an inventive bit of
direction well co-ordinated with the
original music by Paul Bowles. The
costumes were designed by Charles
Rain.
“Encounter” also had as its cen
tral figure a technician capable of
playing a role and directing it at the
same time. He was Lew Christensen,
whose work was significant in all
three of the presentations, and meant
everything to the success of the light,
enchanting Mozartian number.
Likewise to be mentioned for honors
are Marie Jeanne, Ruby Asquith and
Eric Hawkins, each present many
times over during the evening and
always to their credit. It is only fair
to mention, furthermore, in Justice to
the less prominent members of the
Caravan, that the ensemble numbers
were beautifully timed and executed.
— *--—____
Deanna Durbin Thrives
On Hard Film Work
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
«
HOLLYWOOD, Dec. 2 (N.A.N.A.Deanna Durbin celebrates 15th birth
day anniversary Saturday.
Deanna loves—interviews, autograph hunters, picture making work
(which means practically the same thing), picture going “I go to
every movie. I’ve already seen One Hundred Men and a Girl' three times
Including the preview. I cried, it was so sad, but I’m going again” . . . She
also likes nine hours of sleer» everv A
night . . . Pood—“I eat anything—
particularly starches.” (Miss Durbin’s
weight is HO
pounds, against 5
feet 3 inches of
V a ; U
And, of course, in
true Hollywood
fashion. Deanna
enjoys swimming
—in the pool of
her large, expen
sive e s t a t e—
horseback riding,
which she mas- x
tered a year ago ^
—and singing. "
training in earn- shfilah Graham.
est four years
ago—although I’ve been singing all
my life, from the age of 1” . . . The
brunette starlet has been mentioned
as a future candidate for the New
York Metropolitan Opera Co.—but
Deanna is not so sure.
’’I haven’t time—I'm under contract
to Universal for the next seven years
to make three pictures a year. It
doesn’t give me time for anything.
I’d like to go to college—but I won't
be able to sandwich it In. I’d like to
go to Europe—but, again. I haven't
time. I work eight hours every day
for pictures, schooling—I’m in the
eleventh grade—posing for pictures
and singing lessons. Doesn't leave me
much time for fun—but I love It.”
* * * *
Deanna was bom In Winnipeg,
Oanada . . . Her parents—Ada Read
and James Durbin of Manchester,
England — christened their second
daughter Edna Mae . . . The oldest,
Edith, a school teacher, is now mar
ried to a Los Angeles bank clerk.
"Daddy is a real estate operator—
but he doesn't do much of that'now
because he’s busy looking after me.”
60 is Mrs. Durbin—who is always on
the set with her daughter.
In 1935, M-G-M planned to star
Schumann-Heink in a story based on
her life, and they required a girl with
a good singing voice to portray the
opera star as a girl. Agent Jack Sher
rill produced Deanna Durbin. Be
fore signing a contract, she was told
to sing into a studio telephone. The
other end connected with Louis B.
Mayer’s ear in New York. He was
very enthusiastic, but that didn’t stop
Deanna from twiddling her thumbs
for six weary months (with a brief
exception of one short) while she
waited for her movie career to begin.
When option time came around, La
Durbin was axed.
She had been receiving $150 a week,
which was quite a loss to the Durbin
family. But fate—in the shape of
Executive Rufus* le Maire, who had
also left the M-G-M fold—entered
the game. Le Maire brought Deanna
with him to Universal. And then
her troubles really began. New Bosses
Charles Rogers and J. Cheever-Cowdin
wanted to force out some of the pro
ducers, directors and writers under old
contracts. They had a brilliant Idaa
of putting some of them Into a medl
' ocre “B" picture and make them com
mit film hara-kiri. And so—Producer
Joe Pasternak was given the assign
ment of ‘‘Three Smart Girls,” Henry
Raster was made director, and un
known Deanna Durbin received the
chief singing and dramatic role.
"But even then I had to fight,’’ says
Deanna. "A lot of people thought that
Jean Dante (14-year-old Import from
the New York stage) would be better—
I gueas that’s why I was kept in.” . . .
DANCING.'
nroTvi e tqp» dancing! 1
RESTYLE MM.
*Ot>#r 40.000 Fupilt Throughout U. S."
DON MARTINI
"Distinctive Sociol Dance Instruction"
CCtTCltp, TALENTED TEACHERS.
Private ‘Lessons, Moderate Rates!
tftfl II CT M Ml National 3767
101 * " »ll WslTs District 2838
ETHEL M. FfSTlRE
Former Arthur Murray Teacher
STUDIO 1223 CONN. AVENUE
Om ie t» le._Telephone DI. 2460.
FLASH-LIGHT DANCE
Retard*,. Dee., 4. at Csnellti Rhythm
art, 7*4 11th N.W. »:«*. Tsnso Instruc
tion! *:36 to 12. Denelns. Sinslns. Fan,
Refreshments. Tit, Nothin* like H on/
where else, 0
Three Smart Girls” made picture his
tory—and Deanna, a front-rank star
, . . ‘‘One Hundred Men and a Girl”
proved she was not a one-picture fluke
. . . Current film—“Mad About Music”
with Herbert Marshall.
(Copyright. 1937. by the North American
Newspaper Alliance. Inc.)
Myrna Makes Mr. Powell Register Concern
An attentive Wtlham Powell seems somewhat disturbed at what is falling upon Miss Lov’s ear
through the medium of Mr. Bell’s little invention. It is a scene from “Double Wedding " in which
the popular co-starring combination comes to the Capitol screen tomorrow Listening in on tele
phone conversations is one of Mr. Powell’s lesser pursuits during the unreeling, however His
first song recorded for a sound track should prove more momentous.
Little Splits Week.
rJ''HE Little Theater will depart from
its customary policy next week
to present two feature pictures within
one seven-day period. The plan was
decided upon as a means for showing
THEATER PARKING
6 P.M. TO
1 A.M. 35®
CAPITAL GARAGE
LOANS
71 y«ar* of buying, selling and
lending on diamonds, jewelry, etc.
L*“* M Po..ibl. Kau«
CASH FOR OLD 60LD
iGortrnment Ucenw)
E. HEIDENHEIMER
Etfablithtd 1898
LOAN OFFICE
,*■«* •*. W ASM. STOEB
AIM, Ta. 131* B St. M. W.
often-requested revivals which could
not be booked for a full week.
Beginning Sunday "The Mystery of
Edwin Drood,” co-starring Claude
Rains and Heather Angel, is to be
seen. On Thursday it is to be re
traced by Robert Donat and Made
leine Carroll in "The 39 Steps.’’
! (beautifulcSriia!DCAPT!^r^Sy 'SdSLjr
J$o*uL f&Jchjrjr
»\ _ ___ _ In Warner Bros'. ' •
WE Slot SHANGHAI
Ir^uTD^ ( BEVERLY ROBERTS
I "UlCWWl 1 RICARDO CORTEZ
II jyrriiii Iiihhi
| WAINIR RROS. RRISKNT
j KAY
! Francis
j t3hdty
* PRESTON FOSTER • ANITA LOUISE
■ WALTER CONNOLLY
VERREE TEASDALE • VICTOR JORY • LOUISE
FAZENDA • Directed by STANLEY LOGAN
Screen Play by Rowland Leigh • From the Plav by George S. Kaufman

I
k
I

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A laughing hurricane of romance, intrigue
and scandal! . . . Revealing how states
men take the bows, and women take the
statesmen in good ol' Washington, D.‘ G.l

A
STARTS
TOMORROW
Warner Bros.
EARLE
m ^
a
“Curtainless” Play
For Stage Students.
'J'HS Theater Guild's Board of
Managers has arranged a spe
cial “curtainless” performance of
“Madame Bovary,” with Constance
Cummings, for students of technical
stagecraft, to take place In New York
on Tuesday afternoon, December 7.
Tickets will be sold only upon appli
cation to students of stagecraft.
Hie curtain will not be lowered
during the entire course of the play,
which is made up of l# rapidly
moving scenes. The audience win be i
permitted to see the stage crew per
forming their marvels of rapid scefte
transformation, and also some of the
costume changes which take place on
the stage.
Those desiring to attend the per
formance must write to the Theater
Quild for tickets, which will be al
lotted in the order in which the let
ters are received.
This special performance is the re
sult of innumerable requests from
students of stagecraft for permission
to watch the backstage workings of
"Madame Bovary. ” Lee Simonson's
lettings change in split seconds with
>ut the use of a revolving stage, and
here are approximately 600 props.
Benn Levy, the director and adapter
>f the play, when he gave his permis
sion for this special performance,*
itipulated only one condition—he in
sisted that one “Red," a member of
ihe backstage crew, be forced to comb
tils hair and put on a shirt.
Phyllis Welch has signed for a course
if tennis instruction under the tute
lage of Keith Olendhill, Ellsworth
Vines’ doubles partner.,
I I
»n. m .wuim— ■■■■ , .. . - — _I
DEL MONTE
Vacuum-Packed
Golden Bantam
CORN
2eu,> 25c
COLLEGE INN |
Tomato Juice
COCKTAIL
26 oz. JAR
2T
■ ngc^gaBiii iiiwa—Magr
UNICO
MAYONNAISE
Pt. JAR
21c
“SUNSHINE” BINGS a 19c—SMACKS _, JW
“UNEEDfl BAKERS” GRAHAM CRACKERS - - a 18*
Pillsbury’s Pancake Flour - - 2pkg- 19°
SUNSWEET PRUNES z W
SCHINDLER’S BUTTER - - -•19'I
'
• p— ■ I .
UNITED /
MNQAKE
FLOUR
SUNDINE
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE
POMPEIAN
OLIVE
OIL
V2 Pt. Can
17c 1
SUNMAID
SEEDLESS
OR
SEEDED
RAtSIKS
Idaho Baking Potatoes_5 n». 14c
CALIF. CARROTS—_3 20c
FANCY NANCY HALL
Sweat Potatoes..__4 »». 17c
HARD CJIISP FANCY CALIF.
ICEBERG BROCCOLI
LETTUCE large bunch |
2<«15«| 15‘
®/joicy\
/ FLORIDA \
f ORANGES )
V d.,|8e 7
Norfolk Spinach_2 »>»• 13c I
cl?«fT Brussel Sproutsgt. bo» |7c I
Fla. ^Grapefruit _5e “• I
t
PuRELARDl2eib.
GOETZE1 LOIN
HAMS P0RK R0AST
27* - I 24‘
Fresh Hams.. 23c
Fresh Picnics..19c »>
United SLICED BACON
v
20c 44 ,b

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