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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 05, 1937, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1937-12-05/ed-1/seq-6/

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Constitution Program to Be
Attended by Men From
Signing States.
Distinguished representatives se
lected by Governors of 10 of the orig
inal States ratifying the Constitution
Vil) attend the Catholic University
celebration oi the sesquicentennial of
the signing of the famous document
at 8 p.m. Tuesday in McMahon Hall.
The States will be represented by
Gw following: Delaware, first State
at ratify, E. Ennals Berl, attorney;
New Jersey, third, John F. Ryan, at
torney; Georgia, fourth, Stephens
Mitchell, president of the Atlanta Bar
Association; Connecticut, fifth, John
L. Gilson, probate judge of New Ha
ven; Massachusetts, sixth, John P.
Higgins, former Representative in Con
gress and now chief justice of the
Superior Court of the State.
Maryland, seventh, J. Abner Say
|er. justice of the supreme bench in
Baltimore; Virginia, tenth, the Most
Rev. Peter J. Ireton, coadjutor bishop
Of Richmond and a trustee of Cath
olic University; New York, eleventh.
John A. Coleman, jr., attorney, and
Rhode Island, last, Percival de St.
Aubrn, former general treasurer of the
State.
Gov. Earle of Pennsylvania, second
State to ratify, has notified the uni
versity his State also will be repre
sented.
The university celebration will con
sist of an address on the "Catholic
Philosophy of the Constitution.” by
the Rev. Dr. Moorhouse Millar of
Fordham University; an address on
"Catholic Signers of the Constitution,”
by Dr. Edmund C. Burnett of the
Carnegie Institution here; a talk on
“The Catholic Contribution to Consti
tutional Law,” by former Chief Judge
William C. Walsh of the fourth judi
cial circuit of Maryland, and an ad
dress by the Rex'. Dr. Robert J. White,
dean of the university Law School, on
“The Constitution and the Papal En
cyclicals of Our Time.”
CITY NEWS IN BRIEF
TODAY.
Meeting. Photo Engravers’ Union,
Hamilton Hotel, 10 a m.
Oyster roast and picnic, Southeast
Business Men's Association, Griffith
Farms, noon to 8 p.m.
Meeting, Irish History Club, 1500
Newton street N.E, 8 p.m.
Memorial services. B. P. O. Elks. 919
H street N.W.. 8 p m.
•• Tea dance. Sigma Delta Fraternity,
Willard Hotel, 3 p.m.
TOMORROW.
Dinner. First Congregational Club,
First Congregational Church. 6 30 p m.
Meeting, District Optometric Club
Society. Lafayette Hotel, 8 p.m.
Bazaar, Americanization School As
sociation, Tenth and H streets N.W.,
10 a m. to 10 p.m.
-0 -. ■ ■
Conference on Goiter Scheduled.
An international conference for the
study of goiter will be held in Wash
ington September 12, 13 and 14 of
next year, it was announced yesterday
by Curtis Hodges, executive director
of the Greater National Capital Com
mittee of the Board of Trade.
Speaker
FORMER ACTRESS BEFORE
TOWN HAUL.
MRS. BEATRICE HALE,
Note a lecturer for the League
of Nations Union in Great
Britain, who will address the
Town Hall of Washington
tonight at 8:15 o’clock in the
Rialto Theater. Although
born in New York City Mrs.
Hale received her early edu
cation in Scotland. She made
her stage debut at 17, but re
tired in 1910 after her mar
riage. She is a niece of the
late Sir Johnston Forbes
Robertson. Her subject to
morrow night will be “The
Women’s Movement — Where
Have We Moved?’’
1 ■ • — - ..
Hospital Plan to Be Discussed.
Plans to oppose use of the old Tu
berculosis Hospital at Fourteenth and
Upshur streets N.W. as an adjunct to
Gallinger Hospital will be outlined to
morrow at 7:30 p.m.- at a meeting of
the Piney Branch Committee for
a Greater Educational Center. The
meeting is to be held at the Roosevelt
High School.
New Corporation to Leave
Both Free Agents
Editorially.
By the Associated Press.
NASHVILLE, Tenn, Dec. 4.—The
two Nashville newspapers—the Ban
ner and the Tennessean—announced
tonight the formation of a printing
corporation to publish both, but with
each preserving its own corporate
identity.
The plan, effective after tomorrow
morning's issues, involves discon
tinuance of the Tennessean's evening
edition and of the Sunday Banner.
The Tennessean will be published
seven mornings a week and the Ban
ner six afternoons.
The announcement was made by
Silliman Evans, publisher of the Ten
nessean, and James G. Stahlman,
publisher of the Banner.
“This corporation will have charge
of the advertising, circulation and
mechanical processes of the Nash
ville Banner and the Nashville Ten
nessean,” said the announcement.
“Each paper will be absolutely free
in the conduct of its own news and
editorial department without inter
ference with the other or from the
newspaper printing corporation, the
production agency, or any other
source.”
It was disclosed that the negotia
tions have been in progress since Au
gust.
Work is in progress on a new build
ing that will accommodate both
papers. Until it is completed, the
Tennessean will publish in the Ban
ner building.
OFFICERS TOBE NAMED'
Cosmopolitan Club to Select New
Leaders Thursday.
Officers will be nominated at a
meeting of the Cosmopolitan Club
Thursday at the Carlton Hotel. The
election will be held the following
Thursday.
Under changes in the by-laws,
adopted last week, the retiring presi
dent automatically becomes a member
of the Executive Committee, with full
voting powers.
Air In D. C. Buses
To Be Investigated
By Health Experts
Health Officer George C. Ruh
land announced yesterday that
expert* of hi* department soon
would Investigate the purity of
air in buses of the Capital Transit
Co., using a new piece of techni
cal apparatus which measures
the carbon dioxide content.
This will be done, he said, as
soon as his agents complete
studies of the condition of the air
in theaters and other public halls.
At the same time, Richmond B.
Keech, vice chairman of the Pub
lic Utilities Commission, flatly
denied an assertion by Robert E.
Acorn that the commission had
"side tracked” a complaint by
Mr. Acorn about the air in buses.
Mr. Acorn’s complaint was made
to Representative Dirksen, Re
publican, of Illinois, who is in
vestigating the transit situation.
Argentine Smokes More.
Smokers of Argentina are consum
ing much more American tobacco than
at this time last year.
D. C. PLAYERS TO GIVE
“THE OTHER WISE MAN”
Caat Mad* Up Prom Groups in All
Sections of City to Present
Van Dyk* Masterpiece.
“The Other Wise Man," Dr. Henry
Van Dyke’s world-famous legend, will
be presented at Luther Place Memo
rial Church, Fourteenth and N streets
N.W., during Christmas week by a
group of well-known Washington
players headed by Denis E. Connell.
The play will be presented for four
nights, beginning December 27. This
will make the thirteenth consecutive
Christmas season it has been produced
in Washington.
The cast will be made up from play
ers' groups in all sections of the city,
and any one is invited to join the cast
at this time. The first rehearsal will
be held at 7:30 o'clock Thursday night
at the Luther Place Church.
*
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Open Evelines Until Xmas
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Walnut Cedar Chest_$17.50 M
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Colonial Rocker_$22.50
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Cabinet Smoker._$4.95 4i
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Martha Washington fi
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Maple Cricket Chair_$7.75 Jf,
Telephone Table & Chair._$7.50 4]
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Uphol. Occasional Chair_$6.50
Sheraton Desk Chair_$5.95 ^
Mahogany Cocktail Table, $9.95 IM
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Wood Poster Crib_$12.75 Vl
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Console Table____$5.95 gj
Circle Mirror_$7.50 II
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