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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 15, 1937, Image 5

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■ FUTUREU.S. RIGHTS
Showdown Looms in De
mand for End of “Unlaw
ful Interference.”
* Br the Associated Press.
The United States’ protest to Japan
against the bombing of the gunboat
Panay, informed persons said today,
has served to raise the broader ques
tion of the whole future of American
rights in China.
President Roosevelt and Secretary
Hull awaited a direct reply to the
latter's formal note, which demanded
not only adequate reparation for the
Panay sinking, but also a guarantee
»f no further ‘‘unlawful Interference"
With American rights.
It was on that wider issue, re
sponsible persons said, that a possible
showdown might come In American
Japanese relations unless Japan agrees
unconditionally to the United States'
terms for an amicable settlement.
Most observers expressed the belief
that nothing stronger than note-writ
4 lng was indicated in the situation.
Referendum Petition Signed.
While the Panay incident remained
a principal topic of conversation in
diplomatic and congressional circles,
a majority of House members signed
a petition to bring about a vote on a
constitutional amendment requiring a
popular referendum before the United
States could declare war.
The House probably will not con
sider the proposal before January. It
would have to pass both House and
Senate by a two-thirds vote and then
Casualty List
J
Four Reported Dead and
18 Wounded in
Bombings.
By the Associated Press.
SHANGHAI, Dec. 15 —The United
States cruiser Augusta today issued
the following list of casualties sus
tained in the bombardment Sundav
of the United States gunboat Panay
and three Standard Oil Co. ships:
Dead.
Charles Ensminger, Ocean Beach,
Calif., Panay storekeeper.
Capt. C. H. Carlson, commander of
’ one of the oil company ships.
Sandro Sandri, Italian newspaper
man.
(A Chinese crew member of one of
the vessels involved also was reported
killed.)
Wounded ‘‘Stretcher Cases.”
Alex Kozak, machinist's mate,
Ansonia, Conn., serious chest wounds.
Lt. Arthur F. Anders, Vallejo,
* Calif., shot in throat.
Emile Gassie, embassy clerk, broken
leg
Lt. Comdr. James J. Hughes, com
mander of the Panay. broken leg.
Kenneth James Rice, electrician's
mate. Mishawaka, Ind., abdominal
wound.
Peres Dix Ziegler, cook, Delaware,
Ohio, neck wound.
Charles Scott Schrover, Baxter,
Iowa, seaman, leg and stomach
wounds.
« Edgar William George Hulsebus,
seaman, Canton, Mo., serious back
wounds.
John Henry Lang, chief quarter
master. Long Beach, Calif., face and
chest cuts.
Newton Lewis Davis, fireman,
Bhreveport, La., shock.
Carl Henry Birk, electrician's mate,
Milaca, Minn., gunshot wound in neck.
Less Seriously Wounded.
Cecil Barnard Green, seaman. West
Tulsa, Okla., wounds in both shoul
ders.
Lt. John W. Geist, Altoona, Pa., leg
wounds.
Jim Marshall, writer, Seattle and
Chicago.
F. Hayden Vines, Roanoke, Va„ em
ploye of American British tTobacco Co.
Electrician's Mate Raymond L.
Browning, Los Angeles, Calif.
The following were included among
the list of wounded as reported by
newspaper correspondents on the
British gunboat Bee:
J. Hall Paxton, embassy second sec
retary.
Robert Raymond Hebard. fireman,
Friendship, Wis., hip wound.
be submitted to the States. Thirty
six States would have to approve It.
“Unlawful Interference” Charged.
The State Department's note to Ja
pan went further in asking for guar
antees of no more "unlawful interfer
ence" than did President Roosevelt’s
earlier memorandum. The latter
asked that the Japanese government
adopt “methods guaranteeing against
a repetition of any similar attack in
the future. *
As stated in written form to the
Japanese government, the new Ameri
can condition might apply to any issue
involving possible infringement ot
American rights in the Japanese
Army’s penetration of China.
President Roosevelt said at a press
conference late yesterday there would
be no change in the policy of evacuat
ing American nationals from danger
zones, a task at which the Panay was
engaged.
Other Conditions Fulfilled.
Japan already has fulfilled the
other American conditions. Even be
fore the formal American protest was
delivered by Ambassador Joseph C.
Grew to Foreign Minister Koki Hirota
in Toklo, the latter had placed in the
American envoy's hands a formal note
expressing profound apologies and giv
ing assurances of adequate compensa
tion for the Panay bombing.
This note went further with a prom
ise to "deal appropriately with those
responsible for the attack.” It added
that strict orders had been issued to
prevent the recurrence of “a similar
incident.”
All these assurances, it was expected
here, will be repeated in Japan's
formal rejoinder. Whether the Presi
dent and Secreary Hull find such a
reply satisfactory depends on Japan's
attitude toward the “no unlawful
Interference” clause.
Silent on Future Action.
Officials declined to speculate on
what further action they might take
if adequate assurancs are not forth
coming. Such an eventuality admit
tedly, however, would place an even
greater stress on the relations between
Washington and Tokio.
Added interest was evidenced here in
whether Emperor Hirohito would
communicate personally with Presi
dent Roosevelt. The President broke
diplomatic precedent Monday in re
questing that his expression of shock
and concern be conveyed directly to
the Japanese sovereign.
In the House, Representative Lud
low, Democrat of Indiana, who pro
posed the war referendum amendment
as a step toward guaranteeing peace
for this Nation, predicted It would
pass.
The amendment would apply only
to wars on foreign soil. It proposes
that when there appears strong danger
of America being drawn Into such a
conflict, citizens would be polled on
the question: “Should America declare
war on (name of nation)?”
Northern Chile is the driest area on
earth of which there are authentic
records.
DODD, JR., LEADS GROUP
IN PANAY CASE PROTEST
Heads Delegation of Triends of
China in Visit to Japan’s Con
sulate in New York.
By the Associated Press.
NEW YORK, Dec. 14.—William E.
Dodd, Jr., son of the United States
Ambassador to Germany, headed a
delegation or the Friends of China
Council of the American League for
Peace and Democracy, which protested
today the gunboat Panay bombing to
the Japanese consulate.
While they rode up 40 floors to the
consulate, above the busy corner of
Fifth avenue and Forty-second street,
five pickets paraded the sidewalk.
The delegation failed to see Consul
General Kaname Wakaaugl and were
Informed by police he had left by
another door. They threatened to
remain until granted an audience.
The protest was handed a vice consul.
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