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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, December 21, 1937, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1937-12-21/ed-1/seq-7/

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SUGAR AGREEMENT
RATIFIED IN SENATE
Thomas Describes Pact as "Inter
national Agreement to Con
trol World Market.’’
Bt the Associated Press.
The Senate ratified yesterday an in
ternational sugar stabilization agree
ment. which Senator Thomas. Demo
crat, of Utah, described as the "first
attempt by international agreement
to control the world market in a given
commodity.”
The agreement was signed by the
United States and 20 other countries
at London on May 6.
It provides that exporting countries
■shall undertake limitation of their
shipments to the free market, in which
is handled all of the commodity not
dealt with on a preferential basis.
This country is not an exporting
Nation and is affected only because
a small fraction of the American mar
ket is free.
--
Turkeys Give Ride.
IDAHO FALLS. Idaho (fP).—Farmer
Fred Daniels suffered three broken
rTbs when two of his turkeys took him
for a ride.
The turkeys were roosting on a
rafter. Daniels climbed upon a barrel
end grabbed them by the legs. The
turkeys took off, lifting Daniels back
ward and dropping him on the ground.
Gins Groan 24 Hours Daily
Under Record Cotton Crop
By the Associated Press.
O DONNELL, Tex., Dec. 21.—Cot
ton. White gold. Miles of it. Thou
sands of bales, mountains of seed piled
in the open. Gins groaning 24 hours
a day under capacity loads. Pickers
jingling money.
It's a record crop for the plains
country of Northwest Texas. Old
timers say the total will be 1,000,000
bales when the season ends shortly.
This unprecedented production has
its hub in O'Donnell—population 1.000.
Cotton virtually surrounds the town.
Five gins have been unable to care!
for the output, and plainsmen have j
dumped 5,000 to 6,000 bales on the
ground.
It finally reached such a state that
orders were Issued against placing any
more within city limits because of the
fire hazard.
Many farmers have hauled their
cotton in wagons, waited two days
outside a gin and finally, -in despera
tion, WTitten their names across their
wagons and departed.
"Maybe they’ll get to it and maybe
they won't,” they mumbled.
Some have carried their product Its
far as Abilend, more than 100 miles
distant.
Pickers flocked to the plains to
gather, at an average of 45 cents per
100 pounds, the bale-to-an-acre crop.
Farmers couldn’t house them. Tents
were erected, cow sheds pressed into
service.
Much cotton may never be plucked.
It’ll rot In the fields because of cold
weather.
Compresses have been taxed as
heavily as gins. At Brownfield unpro
tected cotton stretched more than a
mile from the platform.
Says one grizzled farmer: ‘T've been
here 60 years and never seen anything
like it. And you can be here 160 more
and you'll never see anything like it.”
^ ^HERE YOU'LL FIND HIS
.iin mi
K"T^^tELL0 BOLE I | YEL^^^E I YELLO BOLE FRANK MEDICO f
1 REflEII AD I I i fcubw HWbb I
1 nCUUUAn I CARBURE 1 HR H IMDFRIAI The only pipe with the I
n The only genuine I II imrtniAlM cellophane-wrapped ah* I
honey-cured pipe. H A flne *>rtar pipe. II A fine quality of briar. sorbent Alter which I
H Choke of shapes. IB honey-cored to smoke 11 Cured with real honey draws off tongue-biting Q
«L_ H . mlld and sweet. II to gmoke m,w. heat. f|
W *1-00 §j^ $£.25 ££;; $£.50 $£.00 gp
;t£-*S£S£llfl caroiiretor kaywoodie I'SUPER-GRAIN KAYWOODI£y>
*,. tail fflt* «MtAK Rtrodlk’' W* mixture of air and smoko th* . .
fee. * Igiii^'-'WdfOfyImproves tho flavor, ktips tha bowl tiof:;**tWs •
. fever fettfet * '< ... dry, and ketps your smoko cool. *MWm %*&**'*«*«« in ^ jy
■,50 cj on # •,?, *
*4 ^ ^
Prices May Vary Slightly In Maryland and Virginia Stores on a Few Items Which Are Under State Contract Law*.
-I
Get Your Xmas Food Needs
At the A&P SELF-SERVICE
STORES and
SIX CONVENIENT LOCATIONS
^ • Ik
Georgia Avenue at New Hampshire O.P.F,W !
6205 Georgia Ave. at Rittenhouse St. I A T" C
5010 1st St. N.W. near Farragut St. L"A" I "E
18th & Hamlin Sts. N.E., just off R. I. Ave. XMAS 9
3228 Wisconsin Ave. at Macomb St. EX/IT
4851 Massachusetts Avenue N.W. EYE
FANCY FRESH PILGRIM BRAND
TURKEY* #
CHICKENS .11 33c * ■^
RIB ROAST t? ..“■ 21c ( % P>
FRESH HAMS X.. »■ 21c f < I T
FANCY LEG 0’ IAMB1125c
CHUCK ROAST 'Zr. *• 17c \ LB.
FRESH PORK LOINS ire . * 19c
v Armour’s Star Hams _»>. 24c
T Center Slices Smoked Ham_«». 29c
Freshly Ground Beef_2 lhi. 25c
3-Corner Beef Roast_»>. 21c
Savory Sirloin Steak_»>. 27c
Porterhouse Steak_n>. 29c
*5 Tender Round Steak_n, 25c
mm OYSTERS
i^-/ _ Standard! 90s
’ Krout SWEET «A.
5c lb s$-W Juice-laden Florida <nj?y\ ow
jT0RANGES(m
Jr 12'<™ 5~a19« **
Jg GRAPES lag; 6clb ||\
L& SOLID SLICING TOMATOES- 2 25c
VS, CALIFORNIA CAULIFLOWER .wd 12c
3 FRESH CRANBERRIES ...2«...
Afresh California PEAS - 2 '■», 19c
'B0X
Chocolate.. 2 ^ 25g^^M
^MW^^k BED CIRCLE COFFEE_2 Jft 37c
Selected Eggs jssmb-25c
Sunnyfield sks Butter '•jyp_ ». 45c
SMALifsweet Cranberry Sauce DrM"-**»’ *Cc
DC AC ona Paaches -ft & 15c
■ CAj Gold Medal Flour_HUP 49c; HUP 97c
2n°.2^ Cc Camel Pitted Dates_** 9c
cans ^ «S Maryland Mincemeat_VP 23c
Cluster Raisins £,“•_2 ^ 23c
AGP grade Sauerkraut_2 «.l 5e
English Walnuts_2 »«. 45c
» lona Toma*° Juice_-—A ’VS-15c
TiMilRlIi^^ SpryorCrisco_^ 49c
Campbell’s tomato Soup_4 ««. 25c
mi Mmi AGP °”d< PumPkiB-2 n.. 17c
iiktvjAiH Monogram Dates_UP. 10c; V5: 19c
I White House Jelly_ _,2 ciatM* I7c
! [y Cal. Pressed Figs_ *s: 8c
((4 Prices effective in A&P SELF-SERVICE STORES ONLY—until elm.
in* Friday, December 24th. W* reserve the ri*ht to limit quvntitle*.

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