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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, January 19, 1938, Image 13

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ADMIRAL ALLEN
GETS NEW DUTIES
General Board Member Is
Named Commandant of
Three Navy Districts.
Rear Admiral William Henry Allen,
U. S. N., 3024 Cortland Place N.W.,
was ordered by the Navy Department
today to assume duty as commandant
of the Sixth Naval District, with ad
ditional duty as commandant of the
Charleston, S. C., Navy Yard and
commandant of the Seventh and
Eighth Naval Districts.
About March 7, he will relieve Rear
Admiral Henry V. Butler, former
commandant of the Washington Navy
Y’ard, who retires April 1 on reaching
the age of 64 years.
A member of the General Board
since June 3 last, Admiral Allen prev
iously had been commander of the
Yangtze patrol of the U. S. Asiatic
Fleet. Prior to that, he was com
mandant, of the 16th Naval District
in the Philippines. In 1928 he served
in Washington in the Office of Naval
Operations.
He has served previously in Charles
ton as captain of the Yard and assist
ant commandant of the Sixth Naval
District. He formerly commanded the
U. S. S. Yorktown, Nansemond, Sirius,
Aroostook and Denver.
Native of South Carolina.
Bom in Florence, S. C., in 1878,
Admiral Allen was appointed to the
Naval Aacademy from his native state
in 1897. During the early part of
the World War. he was navigator of
the U. S. S. Arizona and later was
executive officer of the Virginia. He
holds the Spanish War Medal, Phil
ippine Campaign Medal. Cuban Pacifi
cation Medal, Victory Medal, Second
Nicaraguan Campaign Medal, Order
of the Bust of Bolivar, awarded by Ven
ezuela, and the Daughters of the Con
federacy have given him the Medal
of Service.
Admiral Butler served as command
ant here from April. 1931. to Decem
ber, 1933 His home address is Ma
canie, Shenandoah County, Va. He
served aboard the Olympia, flagship
of Admiral George Dewey, during the
Spanish-Amrriean War. In 1907, he
came to the Navy Department as aide
to Admiral Dewey. Later he was nav
igator of the U. S. S. Utah, served as
captain of the port in the Canal Zone
from March. 1914. to July, 1915, and
commanded the minelayer San Fran
cisco.
Awarded Medal.
He was awarded the Distinguished
Service Medal for his World War
duty. After the war, he was on duty
in the Office of Naval Operations here
in 1919 and 1920, and in 1921 was
Commander of Aircraft Squadrons of
the Battle Fleet. In 1926, he com
manded the aircraft carrier Saratoga
and a year later he was chief of
staff to the commander-in-chief of
the United States Fleet. In July, 1930,
he cams to Washington as a member
of the General Board.
After leaving his assignment as
Commandant of the Navy Yard. Ad
miral Butler was appointed ■Com
mander, Aircraft, Battle Force and
held the rank of vice admiral.
He was born in Paterson, N. J„
March 9. 1874, and entered the Naval
Academy from New York in 1891.
D.C. PHYSICIAN ON STAND
IN CURATOR’S DIVORCE
Wife of Dr. Gaylord Simpson,
New York Museum Head, As
sailed in Testimony.
By the Associated Press.
BRIDGEPORT, Conn.. Jan. 19.—
Depositions of a Washington physi
cian and a New York woman in which
they stated that the four daughters
of Dr. George Gaylord Simpson,
paleontologist, had improper care
from their mother, were in the Supe
rior Court records today.
Dr. Joseph A. Jeffries informed the
court yesterday that the scientist’s
children were poorly disciplined and
not healthy when they came to Wash
ington to live with Dr. Simpson's par
ents. Mrs. Frances Coleman Wil
liams of New York described condi
tions she found in the New Haven
home of the paleontologist while he
Was on an expedition in Patagonia.
The 55-year-old author and curator
at the American Museum of Natural
History charges his wife, the former
Lydia Petroja. with intolerable cru
elty. In a cross-complaint. Mrs. Simp
son charges her husband with cruelty
and desertion.
The trial is in its second week.
CROWS STAY UP LATE
AND FOIL AMBUSCADE
Easton Hunters Bag 900, How
ever, and Find One Lost
Shooter on Island.
Bs the Associated Press.
EASTON. Md., January 19.—The
Easton crow-shooters had a good
time yesterday—they killed about 900
crows, and found one hunter who got
lost.
More than 40 shooters went to Pop
lar Island for their annual slaughter
of the crows which Infest the island
at nightfall and forage on the main
land during the day.
The total slaughtered was less than
usual because the birds were later re
turning to the island.
ADVERTISEMENT.
Lightweight Motor Developed
Prompted by the growing popularity of light-weight planes,
Al Menasco, noted Los Angeles aircraft motor designer, has an
nounced the development of a new aircraft engine so light it
may be held in a man’s arms. He is shown holding the new
motor, ivhich weighs 156 pounds. It is a four-cylinder in line,
and was developed after years of research. The engine, featur
ing air-cooling because of greater fin area, develops 50 horse
power at sea level, or approximately 3.1 pounds per horsepower.
—Wide World Photo.
SALES OPPOSED
Change of Deadline to 2
A.M. Hit by Petworth
Citizens’ Group.
Opposition to further liberalization
of District liquor laws to permit on
saie of liquor between midnight Satur
day and 2 a m. Sunday was voted in
a resolution adopted by the Petworth
Citizens’ Association, meeting last
night in the Petworth School audi
torium.
The resolution, introduced by Harvey
O. Craver, delegate to the Federation
of Citizens’ Associations, declared that
present laws are liberal enough to meet
reasonable needs, that traffic hazards
would be increased and that the pro
posed change would serve no good
purpose.
William P. Kilgore spoke on Com
munity Center Department activities
and showed pictures.
The association adopted a resolu
tion. presented by Mrs. Horace J.
Phelps, regretting the withdrawal of
the corresponding secretary, Mr. Kil
gore. He is moving from Petworth.
The President's Ball was indorsed
in another resolution presented by
George W. Potter, Celebrations Com
mittee chairman.
President Earl W. Cooper appointed
Mrs. Le Verne Beales and Mrs. Phelps I
delegates to the annual meeting of the
Community Chest January 24. He
also appointed Joseph H. Grosman
chairman of the Police Department
Committee.
Reports were made on the progress
ADVERTISEMENT.
CAPT. BOB BARTLETT, ARCTIC HERO,
TELLS HOW TO KEEP UP VITALITY
“Man alive,
I’ve lived on
good hot Tea
and hard tack
in the frozen
north!” That’s
what Captain
Bob Bartlett,
famous explor
er and naviga
tor, thinks of Tea for vitality.
“When me and the Morrissey set
sail,” he says, “you can bet your
boots there’s enough Tea stowed
aboard to see all hands through.
After a grueling trek over the ice
fields, a spot of Tea hoists up my
vitality— keeps me fit. And good
hot Tea lets me turn in later for
my full share of. sleep 1”
Bob Bartlett
Drink Tea often—for vitality, for
delicious flavor. See if you don’t
feel the cheering stimulus almost
at once. And no let-down later!
For teal flavor and vitalizing
effect, remember that good Tea
(Orange Pekoe and Pekoe) comes
from India, Ceylon, and lava*
Sumatra. These good Mack Teas
are especially suited to the Amer
ican taste. For economy and full
enjoyment, buy quality Tea.
■ r
of the new Petworth Library by Mrs.
Harvey O. Craver, on the Federation
of Citizens’ Associations by Horace
J. Phelps and on the special refer
endum by Secretary Raymond E.
Gable.
W. N. Barret, financial secretary,
announced that the following new
members had Joined: Walter J. Green
leaf, Samuel Seigel, Mrs. Elsie M.
Pinney, Mrs. Eva M. Fletcher, P. M.
Ennis and Mrs. Fred H. Gauss.
The American debut of Marie
Jeritza was made at the Metropolitan
Opera House in 1921.
Ceremonies Tomorrow to
Call Attention to Capitol
Quarters.
By WILL P. KENNEDY.
Formal ceremonies at 11 a.m. to
morrow will commemorate the first
meeting place of the United States
Supreme Court In the Capitol.
In the room which now is the pri
vate office of Chesley Jurney, Senate
sergeant at arms, photostatic copies
will be hung of the letter to Congress
of January 20. 1801, from the Com
missioners of the City of Washington
requesting that the Supreme Court
be assigned quarters in the Capitol.
This letter pointed out that "no
house has been provided for the
Judiciary of the United States” and
asked that "the Supreme Court may
be accommodated with a room in the
Capitol to hold its sessions till further
provision shall be made.” The letter
was signed by William Thornton,
Alexander White and William Cranch.
Subsequently this room, in which
notaole decisions of the Supreme Court
were delivered, will be permanently
memorialized by a bronze tablet. It
was in this room that the historic
decision was rendered that Congress
may not set aside a decision of the
court. There Chief Justice John Mar
shall made some of his historic deci
sions.
Frank Kay Green, marshal of the
Supreme Court, will deliver a brief
history of the court's meetings in
that room. The United States archiv
ist. R. D. W. Connor, will present a
photostatic copy of the Commissioners'
letter to Congress, which is now pre
served in the Archives Building. Ser
geant at Arms Jurney will receive it
and promise that it will be preserved
in a bronze tablet, to be placed beside
the marble fireplace in the room.
Chairman Ashurst of the Senate
Judiciary Committee will deliver an
address in tribute to the three Com
missioners of the Capital City. He
will express the appreciation of Con
gress to their successors, represented
by Commissioner Melvin C. Hazen
and Acting Commissioner Patrick H.
Tamsey. Commissioners Oeorge E.
Allen and Daniel J. Sultan are tem
porarily absent from the Capital.
_
POLICE LOOK ON AS MAN
STABS WOMAN AND SELF
Department Heads Helpless as
Murder Is Enacted Suddenly
Across Street. *
By the Associated Press. *
SAN FRANCISCO, Jan. 19.—While
police commissioners and Chief Wil
liam J. Quinn looked on helplessly,
Joseph Fraton, 48, fatally stabbed Mrs.
Henrietta Schrieber, 55, yesterday.
The slaying occurred in Portsmouth
Square, directly across the street from
the Hall of Justice and only 75 feet
from the room in while the commis
sion was meeting.
Police whistle blasts startled the
commissioners and Chief Quinn, who
rushed to windows in time to see Fra
ton stab a prostrate woman, then
plunge the knife into his own throat.
Fraton was charged with murder
after his neck wound was treated.
Police inspectors said he told them
Mrs. Schrieber "done me 'dirt. I was
just crazy jealous, I guess, and when
I met her I just couldn’t help myself.”
*-9
Georgia Ex-Jurist Dies.
SAVANNAH. Ga., Jan. 19 OP).—
Paul E. Seabrook, former Mayor of
Savannah and prominent Jurist, died
here yesterday. He was 73.
He was named judge of the Atlantic
Circuit, Superior Court, when it was
created by the Legislature of 1898, and
continued as judge for 12 years.
Devoe b Reynolds Paints
Benjamin Moore's Paints
922 N, Y, Ave. NAtionol 8610
FOUR COMPLETELY
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led by the famous Blue Ribbon
ORANGE BLOSSOM SPECIALS
Low rail fare* in reclining-seat coaches
(only Seaboard has them, to Florida)
and in Pullman ears. Travel safely
and in comfort on the Seaboard rail*
trail to sunshine. Take vour auto at
low cost. Ask any Ticket Agent or
consult the Seaboard office at 714 14th
St., N.W., Washington. D. C., National
0637-0638.
/ KIIIF THE
SEABOARD
TO
SUNSHINE
IN
FLORIDA
AIR CRASH TRACED
TO ICE ON PLANE
Dispatcher at Butte Testifies at
Hearing Into Accident in
Which 10 Died.
Bj the Associated Press.
BOZEMAN, Mont., Jan. 19.—Testi
mony that loe forming on the tail fin
may have caused the crash of a North
west Airlines plane 14 miles northwest
of Bozeman January 10 with loss of 10
lives was presented before a Depart
ment of Commerce Board of Inquiry
yesterday.
Bert B. Castellano, Western Air Ex
press dispatcher at Butte, testified he
noticed Ice on the ship when it landed
at Butte, but that the ice melted before
the plane took ofT.
Pilot H. B. Rueschenberg testified he
took another ship off the Spokane,
Wash., field shortly after Mamer left
the field on a flight January 8. and
was forced to return by ice forming on
the plane’s vertical stabilizers.
"I saw the ice which was taken off
Mamer's ship. It wasn’t enough to do
any harm. It didn't have any more ice
on it than was on the one I took out
a few minutes later. I noticed no dif
ference In flight.”
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LUMBER one/ MILLWORK
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^Not, 1348, 'The Lumber Number"^
i _EDUCATIONAL. _
ENROLL NOW FOR NEW'SEMESTER
GERMAN
Famous Conversational Brrlita Method
THE BERLITZ SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES
Ills Conn. Ate._National 0270
I DRAFTING I
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Start Now—Day or Evening
Columbia “Tech” Institute
i 1319 F St. N.W. MEt. SB2B
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PDI7PP AND BOYD Shorthand.
|-K|t|_l_ Typing. Business Letter
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BOYD SCHOOL OF COMMERCE.
1333 F_IEst. 20 Yrs )_NAt. 2340 _
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0 Early morning, day and evening
divisions. Special Clanti tor
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Second Semester Begins Jon. 24
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(Co-edacationall
1736 G Street N.W. NA. S2B0
BALTIMORE SUNPAPERS
NAME OWENS EDITOR
Pulitzer Prize Winner Is Given
“Pull Responsibility for
Both Papers.”
By the Associated Press.
BALTIMORE, Jan. 19.—Paul Pat
terson, publisher of the Sunpapers.
announced yesterday appointment of
John W. Owens as editor in chief of
the Sun and the Evening Sun. "with
full responsibility for the direction of
the editorial pages of both papers.”
Mr. Owens, winner of the Pulitzer
Prize last year for outstanding edito
rial writing, formerly was editor of the
Sun.
_EDUCATIONAL
Cartnoninr Fashion Illustrating
Commercial Illustrating
General Commercial Art
Interior Decoration and
Architecture
Architectural and Landscape
Rendering
Columbia “Tech” Institute
Public Speaking
Beginning January 26,
5:30 and 7:30 p.m.
A practical course for professional
ond business men and women eon
I ducted by Professors Randolph ond
Melvin.
Claim limited—Studenti
epeak each eeeeion
Southeastern University
1736 G St. N.W. Natl. 8250
Coeducational
| [»■■■■»■ ==========~
The Temple School
Day Claaset
Complete Secretarial Cannot
Begin February 7
Intensive Secreta rial Courses
far the mid-year graduate eontempUt
ing college next fall atart Feb. nth.
Review and Advance Claasea Every
Monday
Evening Claasea
Shorthand Principle* and Dictation.
Advcrtlalng.
1420 K St. NAt. 3258
EDUCATIONAL._
Washington College of Law >
bo-educational
SEMESTER BEGINS JANUARY 31
New Classes Both Day and Evening
tOOO O Street N.W. MEL 4588
Accountancy
Pace Courses: B. C. S. and
M. C. S. Degrees. C. P. A.
Preparation. Day and Even- . .
lng Classes: Coeducational **
_ Send lor 31 at Year Book.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN UNIVERSITY
HOP 16th Street. N.W. at L MET. 2318
Conmeeeiel. Task
ion. Tint Art a
Costume Design a
Interior Decorat*
ing a Cartooning,
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nnd FIRST prize nt the ball lor B
the most onqinal costume. ■
Placement Bureau, Sid Vear I
Beginners’
Classes
Accountancy and Business
Administration Courses
Leading to B. C. S.
Degree
Forming
January 31, 1938
Walton Courses in
Accountancy
Registrations Now Being
Received
COLUMBUS
UNIVERSITY
1323 Eighteenth Street N.W.
DE. 3443
9*ite*tUue GausUe
SHORTHAND ft TYPEWRITING
Designed especially for Mid-Year High School Grad
uates who expect to enter college in September
A COLLEGE STUDENT with a working knowl
edge of shorthand and typewriting is able to make
better progress with less effort.
TIME: One semester, eighteen weeks, starting j J j 1
February 7, ending June 10.
THE CLASS SECTIONS will be limited in size.
Applications for admission should be made in
advance.
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