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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 04, 1938, Image 13

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PLAYGROUND FUND
WISHED
Mi§s Baker Cites Danger to
Co-ordination to North
east Conference.
Jurisdiction of property under the pro
posed recreational system for the Dis
trict was explained to the Northeast
Conference of Citizens' Associations
last night at their regular monthly
meeting by Miss Sibyl Baker, District
supervisor of playgrounds.
Miss Baker attempted to show ad
vantages in a co-ordinated plan for
all recreational facilities. It would so
co-ordinate playground operations after
school hours and during vacation pe
riods as to create a maximum of effi
ciency with a minimum of overhead
expeases and duplication of effort and
equipment, she said.
Transfer from the playground de
partment to the Community Center
department of some $29,000 approved
by the House yesterday in action on the
District bill, endangers the program,
she said, adding that funds used for
the upkeep and control of playgrounds
after school hours constitute a "minor
point,” but a shift in control would be
a serious detriment to the ultimate
co-ordination of recreational services.
Report! »n Boys’ Club Cost.
M. J. McDonald, chairman of a spe
cial committee for the promotion of a
boys' club in the area of the con
ference, reported to the group the
findings of the eight presidents which
comprise his committee. According to
his report, the expense incidental to
the establishment of a club in one of
the schools would closely approximate
$12 a night, exclusive of equipment.
Operating two nights a week, this cost
would be $100 a month, which funds
would have to be raised by public sub
acription under the present plan of
procedure.
Rather than proceed with this pro
gram, Mr. McDonald offered the sug
gestion that each member body of the
conference appoint five members to
meet and select a committee to make
a further study.
Progressive Program Indorsed.
This committee would work on the
plan already adopted by the original
committee providing for starting on a
modest scale with additions and im
provements as public support grew.
The suggestion w-as approved and voted
by the conference.
A. F. E. Scheer, president of the
conference, was appointed to appear
before the Senate Subcommittee on
Appropriations for the District in an
effort for the restoration in the Dis
trict budget of $3,220 to improve
Langdon Playground.
Upholding their stand of no more
liquor licenses in the Northeast, the
conference voted to disapprove the
issuance of two licenses in the Michi
gan Park area at the request of John
J. Hurley, president of the Michigan
Park group, member of the conference.
LIBERAL ARTS PERILED
Princeton Head Sees Artificial
Bull Market on Education.
NASHVILLE. Tenn., Feb. 4 OP).—
Dr. Harold Willis Dodds, president of
Princeton University, said last night,
"We have created an artificial bull
market in education which is en
dangering the true values of the liberal
arts idea.”
His address came at a symposium
session of a three-day program to be
climaxed Saturday by the inaugura
tion of Dr. Oliver C. Carmichael as
the third chancellor of Vanderbilt,
Dr. Dodds told his audience, which
included many of the outstanding
educators attending the inaugural,
that ‘‘we have put our trust in
diplomas,” to which has been at
tached ‘‘unmerited monetary im
portance.”
Health Physician
Hunts for Owner
Of Rabid Terrier
Montgomery Faces First
Mod-Dog Case in
Six Years,
Special Dispatch to Tha Star.
ROCKVILLE, Md„ Feb. 4.—'The
Montgomery County Health Depart
ment is seeking the owner of a wire
haired fox terrier which was shot and
killed Monday afternoon near the Con
duit road in the Cabin John area
after it had bitten two other dogs.
According to Dr. V. L. Ellicott,
county health officer, an examination
at the University of Maryland Bureau
of Animal Industry disclosed that the
dog was suffering from rabies. The
Health Department is anxious to learn
whether the dog was native to the
community or came in from some other
area and everything else of its history.
Dr. Ellicott said this is the county’s
first case of rabies in the six years he
has been connected with the Health
Department.
The dog is described as being white
with a few' brown spots on its back
and head: its tail was short, black. An
investigation by Dr. Ellicott disclosed
that a stray dog of such description
had been kept and fed by a colored
woman living in a woods in the Brick
Yard neighborhood for about a week
and is of the opinion that the animal
may have been lost or abandoned there
sometime before January 24.
The esse was under consideration at
a conference here yesterday afternoon
participated in by. Dr. Ellicott, Dr.
C. S. Wilbanks of the State Bureau of
Animal Industry and Norman E. Pen
nington, one of the county’s sanitary'
inspectors.
ASKS PROTECTION
Mother of John Roosevelt's
Fiancee Troubled by Curious.
NAHANT. Mass., Feb. 4 (;P).— Mrs.
Haven F. Clarke of Boston and Na
hant. mother of Miss Anne Lindsay
Clarke, whose wedding to John Roose
velt, youngest son of the President, is
scheduled for June 18. yesterday asked
Nahant police for "protection from
pilgrimages" to a newly built house
in which the wedding reception will
be held.
Chief Thomas Larkin of the Nahant
polioe said officers would "keep an eye
on the house" as they made their
rounds and a policeman would be
posted there all day Sundays.
--- •-—
BOLT DESTROYS CHURCH
Lightning Ends Visitor Attraction
on Isle of Capri.
NAPLES, Italy, Feb. 4 t/P).—1The
Church of La Madonna on the Island
of Capri, a tourist attraction, was de
stroyed yesterday by lightning.
Legend said the church was built
to purify the island of the sins of Em
peror Tiberius. It will be rebuilt with
insurance money.
| • ESTABLISHED 1865
PLYWOOD
:/ %
In a Variety of Finishes -
Cabinet makers will find our f
two conveniently located ^
" ; warehouses amply stocked at g
p all times to make prompt j
0 deliveries And Barker prices §
are the lowest in town. Com- f§
p plete selection of hardwoods p
tor oil purposes! f
GEO. HI. BARKER
J • COMPANY •
LUMBER am/MILLWORK
% 649-651 N. Y. Ave. N.W. 1
1523 7th St. N.W. *4
%. Nat. 1348, "The Lumber Number"
NAVY METALLURGIST
SPEAKS AT LUNCHEON
Club Told Most Metals Used in
Modern Construction Were Un
known Few Decades Ago.
J. A. Kingsbury, chief metallurgist
at the Navy Yard, yesterday declined
to comment on specific metals used
in his work, but in his talk before
the Cosmopolitan Club luncheon
stated that most metals used in mod
ern construction were unknown a few
decades ago.
Development in the United States
of various alloys which increase
strength and decrease weight in met
als formerly used probably lost the
World War for Germany, the speaker
commented. Germany already had
developed high-speed steel through
the use of tungsten, he said, and but
for this country’s matching this
achievement the result of the war
may have been different.
One of the honor guests at yes
terday’s meeting was Frits Crisler,
head football coach at Princeton Uni
versity.
D. C. ARCHITECTS WIN
Furr and Mandris Among 20
Surviving in Elimination.
J. S. Furr and E. N. Mandris, both
of Catholic University here, are among
20 winners in the first elimination test
in the national competition for the
Paris architecture prize held in New
York City Wednesday, it was an
nounced here today.
The two Washingtonians are now
eligible for the second test on March
25. Three hundred drawings were sub
mitted.
Kiduieft'jtin*n f=|
_»• 23c lb 23c
3272 M I N.E. MKT. I 2153 P«J 111
St. N.W. | 12th & H N.E. I Av«. N.W.
e^.a Shoulder Leg Breast
Fresh HAMS, Ib. 19c • *md i iud i smd
LITTLE PIG PORK LA"18 LAM® LAMB
Loin ROAST, Ib. 18c ib. 12/4c m. 17c ib. 10c
LITTLE PIG PORK 11 II
CHOPS Ib. 18c REGULAR FRESH HAMS_lb. 22c
FRESH LITTLE PIG chuck roast_lb. i5c & 17c
Shoulders Ib. 16c PRIME RIB ROAST_ lb. 18e
PURE HOG LARD, lean hamburger_lb. i2*/2c
(bulk)-Ib. 10c CENTER CUT PORK CHOPS lb. 21c
Bakin*. Eryin* SLICED BACON _>/2-lb. pkf. 12»/2C
CHICKENS COUNTRY SPARERIBS (meaty) lb. 16c
Ib. 28c BEST TABLE BUTTER _Ib. 35c
KIII FDTonav F,NE AMERICAN CHEESE_Ib. 23c
--- - FRESH BULK SAUSAGE MEAT lb. 18c
FINEST BACON_1-lb. pc*. 21c
P. s. N’t. i FAT BACK- -lb. 10c
POTATOES FRESH nearby eggs_do*. 25*
10 lbs. 15c Fresh Carrots and Beets_bun. 5c j
mo ih, hat »i.4o Iceberg Lettuce _head 5c & 8c
NEW sweet New Green Cabbage_3 lbs. 10c *
POTATOES Fancy Italian Chestnuts ~.10c-3 lbs. 25c
3 lh»- 10c Fancy Winesap Apples_5 lbs. 10c
Kale and Collards Bushel Basket_65c
3 ib*. 10c Grade-A Milk, with bottle_qt 11c
Georgia Cane Homemade Ice Cream, qt. 17e, pt. 10c
Sorghum Syrup Pure App|e Cider (J(Jg frie) faI 25c
Gallon - 7“c Real Good Florida
Ir.... 45c f 0ra"*.« - „, — 10\3 25e
Large Crispy Celery_bunch 10c
Smithfield Smoked Jowls, Smithfield Bacon
Sides and Smithfield Shoulders at AH Stores
"It’s easy
COSMETIC SK
soap with ACTIVE
SCREEN STARS don’t take chances with the
choked pores that cause Cosmetic Sirin—
dullness, tiny blemishes, enlarged pores.
“Use cosmetics all you wish! But guard
against Cosmetic Skin as I do—with Lux
Toilet Soap,” says Franciska Gaal. ”1 use
this soap with ACTIVE lather to keep «iqn
smooth,” says Margot Grahame.
Use Lux Toilet Soap before you renew make
up—ALWAYS at bedtime. ACTIVE lather re
moves thoroughly dust, dirt, stale cosmetics.
ss fkAHCtSM and Margot Graham*
PRODUCTION ‘THE BUCCANEER'
r
9 out of H
Screen Stars use
Lux Toilet Soap
1000 Pairs Work & DressX
PANTS
What a huge collec
tion of high grade,
fine quality pants ...
and what ridicu
lously low price!
Sturdy double - seat
whipcords, long*
wearing corduroy BHlMHflHiiiiM
pants, and an almost
endless selection of
• good looking fabrics
for dress occasions. Remember! You’re not
Get here when the getting “sale” merchan
doors open foe the dUe • • • but regular A*1 ,
greatest clothing ,
bargains of your duced for 1 day of whirl
lifetime! wind selling!
MEN'S BLACK LEATH- $J| AA
ERETTE COATS, belted | IIII
models, 32-in. length. I BvV
79c MEN'S FLANNEL
ETTE WORK SHIRTS, mm
khaki, navy, grev, plaids, ■1 for* I 1
winter weight. Sizes 14 I
to 17 _ *i ■
69c "BIG YANK" BLUE A ( $4
CHAMBRAY WORK V*or»|
SHIRTS. Sizes 14’,i to 17 Mm I
50c WORK SHIRTS, in A r $4
blue and khaki. Broken % I
10c MEN'S COTTON §■ - $4
SOCKS, in solid colors. I I I
Sizes 10 Vz to 12_ I V I
25c & 35c MEN'S DRESS mm (J
SOCKS, some part wools, B* for * |
plain colors and fancies. ■ * I
Sizes 10 to 12_ ®
15c MEN'S RAYON •Mfkr $4
SOCKS, in new spring I M t0f I
patterns_ I Mm ■
$1.95 MEN'S SWEAT- *4 AA
ERS, pullovers, half and * J >1 tk *
full zippers. In many pat- | Bill
terns. Sizes 36 to 46_ ®
79c & $1.00 MEN'S mm *4
SWEATERS, broken lot. ■lfor*|
Pull-over and half-zipper R
styles _ * ■
79c & $1.00 MEN'S Af S4
WINTER UNION SUITS. M tor I
Sizes 36 to 46_ Mm I
50c MEN'S WINTER Af S4
UNDERSHIRTS. All sizes jCtor I
in the Itot_ V ■
$1.00 b $1.29 MEN'S Mb
LINED b UNLINED Ofor*!
GLOVES. Also wool gloves. ■
In all sizes_ A® If
$1.95 MEN'S GOSSA- £4| A A
MERETTE RAINCOATS, I IIII
in broken sizes_ I iVV
$1.95 MEN'S WOOL £A A A
VESTS. Many styles. Sizes I llll
36 to 46_ I IVV
$1.79 MEN'S LEATHER
WORK SHOES, in black, gbgb
moccasin style, with com- A £ llll
position soles, rubber | ||||
heels. Sizes 8 to 12_ I BWW
$1.95 MEN'S BLACK £4 A A
DRESS OXFORD SHOES. I 11} §
Sizes 6 to 12_ I B V V
$1.65 MEN'S LEATHER AA
HOUSE SLIPPERS, in II flfl
black, brown, navy. Sizes 1 111 if
6 to 12_ I BWW
79c MEN'S HOUSE SLIP- fb , «J
PERS, in grey felt and tan M 1
suede__ Mb ■
$1.25 MEN'S HEAVY £f A A
DUTY WORK RUBBERS. I ||||
Sizes.6tol2_ I BBrIf
MEN'S WHITE COT- AA - (4
TON HANDKER- «|%for |
CHIEFS, fine quality I
COTTON BLANKETS, gb , C4
size 66x76 inches. Warm M I
and economical __ Mb ■
GOOD QUALITY BED A. t4
SHEETS, sizes 54x90 and M tor I
72x90 inches. Mb I
PILLOW CASES, In 72x A CJ '
90-inch size. Long JC *|
wearing- V I |
TURKISH TOWELS, of JA. CJ {
soft, heavy texture. I M *or I
Size 15x30 inches __ I ■§ I |
BOYS' BROADCLOTH gk . CJ
DRESS SHIRTS. Sizes
BOYS' MACKINAW CJ JfcJfc I
COATS, in solid colors. 1 IIII
Sizes 12 and 14 only_ I ■UU |
BOYS' CLOTH-LINED gk , CJ i
KNICKERS, for dress J *or I '
wear. All sizes- Mk 8
BOYS' TWEED CORDU- CJ 8888 ^
ROY KNICKERS. All sizes I 11| 1
in the lot .. I iVV |
BOYS' LONG PANTS, 8888
cloth and corduroy. Nice- | ||||
ly tailored_ I sUV
BOYS' PULL-OVER gk . CJ
SWEATERS, in good look- M for I j
ing, fancy patterns_ Mk 8
SUITCASES flr OVER- £4 Jkfk I
NIGHT CASES, 26-inch ||fl
and 18-inch sizes, re- B BBBB t
spectively_ ™ BBBBf I
$1.95 WOMEN'S fr CJ 8888 (
MISSES' SKI PANTS. I llll
Sizes 14 to 20_ I B VV \
CHILDREN'S SKI JACK- CJ 8888 j
ETS, zipper style. Sizes I INI '
6 end 8 only-- I B W |
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parking
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