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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 09, 1938, Image 34

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Living Stage Outlives
Its Old Cemetery
Cain’s Closes but the Theater
Goes on, if Only Bitterly.
“Zola” Chosen as Best.
By JAY CARMODY.
ITS meaning is something that time will write, but Cain’s closed yesterday.
Cain’s, If one does not know it, is the warehouse in New York that has
been synonymous with the end of a show. Without Cain’s a show could
not close, even though without audiences it could not remain open. So
Cain’s sad horses and the company’s indifferent (so it seemed) help always
were the end of a dream. Cain's was where the drama went when it died.
jwvciut vaui is urtuscu tu UC.
Repercussions of the closing were felt
In Washington although no branch of
the company exists here. A great
many persons connected with the the
ater heard the news of Cain's ending
with pleasure. The theater, some of
them thought, had earned its re
venge. Modern drama requires few
sets, is positively niggardly with re
spect to such things. So said some of
the theater’s closet friends. Cain’s
died because there were no corpses to
send to it.
Maybe. But that is only one side of
the story. Cain’s, said others, somewhat
sardonically, died because the theater
is dying. It could not even start and
fail with enough shows to keep a
cemetery (Cain’s again) alive. It was
a bitter, as well as a funny, sound in
one's ears. It is not true. There still
will be the need for a place for plays,
good and bad, to go to when they die.
But, it won’t be Cain’s.
Coincidentally, came the sardonic
announcement that the inheritor of
Cain’s long-established business was
closing up shop in order to go into
the undertaking business.
"Going to stop burying plays, and
bury players,” said those familiar with
the story of the old business.
That, too, was untrue. So was,
"well, let’s go to Hollywood, because
if there is no longer room for Cain’s,
there can be no room for us.”
One can think of a dozen reasons
why it is untrue. One of them is
"Shadow and Substance,” which
played here just a few weeks ago.
There are many plays like that.
There will be many more. So there
will be a new Cain’s, whatever it is
called. They have been burying the
theater at Cain’s for a long time.
Now Cain's is buried. And the theater
survives. Any one want to laugh?
* * * *
VA PART from Cain’s, 998 motion pic
ture critics, from New York to
Nogales, have decided that "The Life
of Emile Zola" was the best picture
of 1937. Voting in the Minneapolis
Journal poll, they further decided
that Paul Muni’s interpretation of the
character of the French author was
the best male performance of the
last year. As to performances by ac
tresses, the motion picture editors
chose Luise Rainer's portrayal of
Olan in “The Good Earth” as the
best of the year. Votes counted on
the basis of 75 for a first choice, 50
for second and 25 for third. If you
would like to know just how the first
r-—-———
10 were rated in each instance, here’s
the summation of the poll, perhaps the
most representative thing al its kind:
ACTRESSES.
Luise Rainer in “The Good Earth,”
42,225 points: Irene Dunne in “The
Awful Truth,” 16,325 points; Norma
Shearer in “Romeo and Juliet,” 16,000
points; Greta Garbo in "Camille,”
15,975 points; Barbara Stanwyck in
“Stella Dallas,” 14,850 points; Janet
Gaynor in “A Star Is Born,” 14,800
points; Katharine Hepburn in “Stage
Door,” 10,400 points; Bette Davis in
Andrea Leeds in “Stage Door,” 6,625
points; Beular Boni in “Make Way
for Tomorrow,” 3,675 points.
ACTORS.
Paul Muni, in “The Life of Emile
Zola,” 54,100 points; Spencer Tracy,
in “Captains Courageous,” 39.800
points; Robert Montgomery, in “Night
Must Fall,” 14,975 points; Fredric
March, in “A Star Is Born,” 12,950
points; Charles Boyer, in “Conquest,”
11.825 points; John Barrymore, in
“Romeo and Juliet,” 5,650 points;
Freddie Bartholomew, in "Captains
Courageous.” 5.600 points; Joseph
Schildkraut, in “The Life of Emile
Zola,” 3,475 points; Claude Rains, in
“They Won’t Forget,” 1,975 points;
Victor Moore, in “Make Way for To
morrow,” 1,725 points.
PICTURES.
“The Life of Emile Zola.” 47,525
points; “The Good Earth,” 28,224
points; “Captains Courageous.” 22,275
points; “Lost Horizon,” 17,225 points:
“A Star Is Bom.” 12,000 points;
“Romeo and Juliet,” 8,100 points;
“Stage Door” 6,650 points; “Night
Must Fall,” 5,300 points; "Make Way
for Tomorrow,” 1.970 points; "They
Won't Forget," 1.675 points.
Warner Brothers, Muni and Miss
Rainer, the first-mentioned producer
of the prize-winning picture, will re
ceive gold medals for their work. In
connection with the awards, if they
care to think about it, they can have
the knowledge that the critics who
voted in the poll represent (whatever
that means, specifically) 65000,000
readers. The readers come from every
State in the Union and from the Dis
trict of Columbia, with the sole ex
ception of New’ Hampshire. As in the
1936 tabulation, motion pictur editors
of that State simply refuse to vote.
Why New Hampshire did not vote re
mains a mystery. It did not, and the
Minneapolis Journal is not a news
paper to explain why that happened.
New Hampshire simply did not vote.
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—“Save Me the Waltz,” a
new comedy by Katherine Dayton:
2:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Earle—“You’re Only Young Once,”
•pirited young actors in a story of first
love: 10:15 a.m., 12:35, 2:55, 5:15, 7:40
and 10 p.m. Stage shows: 11:40 a.m.,
2, 4:25, 6:45 and 9:05 p.m.
Capitol—“Everybody Sing,’’ a song
fest with Judy Garland and Allan
Jones: 11 a.m , 1:45, 4:30, 7:15 and
10 p.m. Stage shows at 2:55, 3:40,!
6:25 and 9:10 p.m.
Metropolitan — “Penitentiary,” an
other “big house” drama: 11:40 a.m.,!
1:40, 3:40, 5:40, 7:40 and 9:40 p.m. j
Columbia—“Love and Hisses,” a fa- j
mous feud comes to the screen: 11:50
a.m., 1:50, 3:50, 5:50, 7:50 and 9:50
p.m.
Palace—"The Buccaneer,” Predric
March stars in the story of a pirate
who helped to save the Nation: 11:15
a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7 and 9:35 p.m.
Keith’s—“Radio City Revels,” a host
of air favorites in a screen vaudeville
show: 11:46 a.m., 1:46, 3:46, 5:46,
7.46 and 9:46 p.m.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts. Con
tinuous from 10 a.m.' to midnight.
Little—“Whirlpool," adult study of
a problem marriage: 11 a.m., 12:45,
2:30, 4:20, 6:05, 7:55 and 9:40 p.m.
Ambassador — “Rosalie,” mammoth
musical with Eleanor Powell: 5, 7:05
and 9:20 p.m.
Penn—“A Damsel in Distress,” Mr.
Astaire dances, as do Burns and Allen:
2, 3:50, 5:45, 7:40 and 9:30 p.m.
Calvert—“A Damsel in Distress”: 2,
2:55, 5:50, 7;45 and 9:45 p.m.
Tivoli—“A Damsel in Distress”: 2:35,
4:55, 7:10 and 9:30 p.m.
Uptown—“Man-Proof,” Miss Loy
discovers that she is not: 2, 3:55, 5:50,
7:50 and 9:50 p.m.
Sheridan—“Tovarich,” brilliant
screen version of the stage success: 1,
3:05, 5:10, 7:20 and 9:25 p.m.
Howard—“Charlie Chan at Monte
Carlo,” the Oriental sleuth solves an
other: 12:30, 3:30, 5:55, 8:20 and
10:30 p.m. Stage shows: 2, 4:40, 7:05
and 9:30 p.m.
Olivia de Havilland and Pat O’Brien
are the latest to be introduced to a
new Hollywood racket. Waiters get
the stars to autograph napkins and
then sell them to fans, and the res
taurants are complaining.
In Person
LEE DIXON,
*vnuse lopnoicn tap aancing
you have seen in a number of
Warner Bros, musicals, comes
to the Earle Theater Friday to
headline the stage show.
Stage Your Next Dance, Club
Dinner or Smoker at
GRIFFITH FARMS
Marlboro Pike
3 Miles From District Line
Phone "Kramer,” ME. 3414 Bet. 9 A 6
B_||_ AT ARMORY
■\Olier SILVER SPRING. MD.
CEvery Evening Except
OKClTing Mon.. 7:30 to 10:30
Diaalr ADMISSION .lOe
■VIllK SKATES _35a
Special rates to skatinc parties over 40
on Tues. and Wed.
Phone Shep. 1506S. S. 761
fOAL
I We carry 31 dlffer
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FREE STORAGE
In hard coals, we handle the Fa
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WHITE ASH Stove. (19 60
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WYOMING (White Ash).
Also From Penna., CIO *) C
Stove or Nut
VIRGINIA ANTHRACITE
Pea $8; Nut $10; Sto. $10.25
B. J. WERNER
1937 5th N.E. NOrth 8813
SPECIAL
FOR 2 DAYS
TKURS. AND FRI.
GOOD WEARING
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C Ct II III Opposite Hecht’s
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P X
Returns to the Fold
WALTER HUSTON,
Whose face hasn’t been seen on a local screen in much too long
a time, comes back again this Friday in the leading role in "Of
Human Hearts’’ the Civil War drama which you have been
reading about as "Benefits Forgot.” It opens at the Capitol.
Fan Mail Barometer
Rises in 1937.
J. AN mail, Hollywood's barometer of
business conditions, was heavier
in 1937 than in any year since 1930,
according to a survey just completed.
Claudette Colbert, as usual during
the past seven years, received more
letters than any player at Paramount.
Dorothy Lamour received more let
ters after her first picture, "The
Jungle Princess,” than most new play
ers receive in 12 months. She now
is working in a similar role In “Her
Jungle Love” being filmed in Techni
color.
Olympe Bradna, who scored in
"Souls at Sea,” and now is playing
a co-starring role with Gene Ray
mond in "Stolen Heaven,” was another
leader in mail from admirers. George i
Raft’s mail doubled after his role in
"Souls at Sea."
Ray Milland and the teams of
Carole Lombard-Pred MacMurray and
Eleanore Whitney-Johnny Downs re
ceived much more mail than in the
previous year.
January and February of 1937,
usually the best months, were eclipsed
by May, 1937—the biggest month
since October, 1928, when the Motion
Picture Producers’ Association and
players decided to charge postage
on fan photographs.
Foreign letters to Paramount play
ers made up 20 per cent of the total
received, whereas in the past foreign
correspondence amounted to only 10
per cent of the total.
Other indications of interest and
larger theater attendance were the
number of proposals of marriage,
autograph books sent for signatures,
increase in Christmas cards, the de
crease in “begging letters" and in
crease in postage sent for photos of
players.
Child Star Signs.
yiRGINIA WEIDLER, one of Hol
lywood’s leading child players,
has been signed to a long-term con
tract by M-G-M Studios as a result
of her work In “Love Is a Headache"
with Gladys George and Franchot
Tone.
The child, who has won stellar
honors in such films as “Freckles"
and “Laddie," joins a group of famed
M-G-M child players which includes
Freddie Bartholomew, Mickey Rooney,
Judy Garland and Robert Spindola.
THEATER PARKING
6 P.M. TO »
1 A.M.
CAPITAL GARAGE
A choice selection from •
a large stock. Enjoy big
savings. _
t Morrison Paper Co.
»oo» >«• *»«. asst^ **+* i
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;»;>;C0AL CO.
Better trade eealt—no hither erica
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2.240 lbs. te the ton.
Every Pound Delivered In Bats te
Your Bin at No Estra Charts.
BLACK DIAMOND—Bituminous
Hard 8trueture. Lisht Smoke:
Ett Sire. *8.75: 75% Lump.
*7.75. 50% Lump, *7.00. Lump
and Fine Coal batted separately.
MARYLAND SMOKELESS—A
Bituminous Coal without Smoke,
Soot or Gas: Ett Sire. *0.75: 80%
Lump. *8.75_._
VIRGINIA HARD COALS.
Ett Sise. *10.00. Stove. *10.25:
Nut. (10.00; Pea. *8.00. Sperial
Stove (half Stove and Pea). *0.00.
POCAHONTAS OIL TREATED.
Smokeless; no tas: low ash. hithest
trade bituminous; Ett Site. *11.00:
Stove. 110.75; Nut, >10.00.
PA. HARD COALS.
Alaska Nurtet Anthracite—Stove,
*12.80; Nut *12.80: Pea *11.00;
Buckwheat. «9.25.
All coals thorouthly re
screened and tuaranteed.
We Deliver Vt-Ton Orders.
Dial NA. 5885 or Jackson 2000
OBDEBS TAKEN DAT OB NIGHT
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a Phone NAtional 7601 I __
y For Home Delivery B
Warner Studio Mildly
Prison-Picture Crazy
Latest Epic, Though, Might Even
Teach Lawes Something
About Penitentiaries.
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD, Feb. 9 (N.A.N.A.).—Warden Lewis E. Lawes, the head
master of the Sing Sing college, should reajly come to Hollywood, and
particularly the Warner Studio, if he wants to experience authentic
jail atmosphere. The Warner brothers have gone simply haywire
over prison pictures, and the warden himself has not helped matters by
selling them his third behlnd-the-bars epic, titled “Sing Sing,” In which
Humphrey Bogart will be Convict No.<8>-—
1. (first story sod by Lawes was the
non-flction "20,000 Years in Sing
Sing.” “Over the Wall," his second
sate to me stuaio,
carried the pro
viso that his
name was not to
be appended un
less he approved
the film. He did.)
"Alcatraz I s -
land” Is responsi
ble for infecting
the Warners with
the prison bug.
It was a fine ef
fort, and suitably
rewarded at the
box office. In ad
dition to "Sing
Rina " th» Pur.
Sheilah Graham.
bank plant is planning “Crime
School,” also with Bogart, assisted by
the “Dead End" boys. And “Girls on
Probation,” which will take you be
hind the scenes of a girls’ prison
school.
* * * *
“St. Louis Blues” is the new title for
“Four Leaf Clover,” in which Para
mount will feature George Raft, Shir
ley Ross, Tito Gulzar (watch for him
in “Broadcast of 1938”—he does things
to your girlish heart), Mary Carlisle,
Elizabeth Patterson, Betty Grable, Ben
Blue, Charlie Butterworth and Robert
Cummings. What, no Martha Raye?
* * * *
King Vidor has signed a two-year
contract with M-G-M and leaves with
in three weeks for England to direct
“The Citadel,” In which Robert Donat
Is starred. Elizabeth Allen, originally
penciled in for the leading feminine
role, probably will be displaced by
Greer Carson, who was brought over
from England to make the picture in
Hollywood and will now go back to film
it in England. A strange method of
procedure, but typical of this cute little
village.
* * * *
The Mauch twins get the big thrill
of their boyish lives with their first
Western—“Sons of the Plains,” in
which they will ride horses, shoot In
dians, and, in short, do everything
boys have wanted to do.
* * * *
Production quickies . . . Lionel Bar
rymore plays the grandfather in Frank
Constitution Holl. Neat Son. Aft.. 4 P. M.
in rnvrvsT
\Htu. Dtmy'i. 1100 Q (Drt>tt>)\1SiL7i5I
-R— —j
Only one shonin*
MAt'RICE CHEVALIER and
JEANETTE MACDONALD
tin her screen debut)
_ "THE LOVE PARADE"
RIALTO THEATRE. Wed.. 8:30 p.m.
presented by
The Film Society of Washinrton
1731 F St. Met, ft 157, 3831.
-OPEN I
uau. f aaA I wren I
rsvW f fi I J „ I 11 a h f
( A Roaring V1 * "/
N,* Aitrrntine■ Romanre^—^J
<mL FREDRIC MARCH \
75|7“The BUCCANEER*’ /
Ktal FltANCISKA GAAl j
)P®!Sffl55Ef5n
■ now I OPEN I
^WALTER WINCHELLV'»• M
■\ BEN '"7
Wj \BERNlE>g^^/>P
Capra’s “You Can’t Take It With
You.” . . . Yet another film story for
hard-working Bette Davis — James
Hilton’s "We Are Not Alone,” showing
Bette as a German dancer stranded in
England . . . Margaret Lindsay is the
“heavy” in “Lovely Lady,” starring
Kay Francis. There seems to be some
miscasting somewhere . . . Mervyn
Le Roy wants to make a Lafayette of
Fernand Gravet in the picture of that
name . . . Make a point of seeing “A
Slight Case of Murder,” depicting
Eddie G. Robinson and a lot of other
screen gangsters in hilarious comedy
roles . . . Shooting of “Josette” has
been abandoned until star Simone
Simon recovers from pneumonia.
* * * a
Walter Wanger, who will gamble
on anything—once—is trying to buy
Paramount's unlucky “Imperial Hotel”
as a starring vehicle for Marlene Diet
rich, who walked out of the production
after the studio had sunk half a mil
lion dollars in it. Marlene is slightly
less fractious these days .. . Franchot
Tone takes over sick Spencer Tracy's
role in "Three Comrades.” . . . Good
news for Charlie Chaplin addicts—
the comedian is putting sound and
music to “The Gold Rush,” and will
shortly reissue the epic to the world.
, . . John Barrymore and his Elaine
jointly attempt the stage next Auugst
in the play, "My Dear Children,”
with the premiere in San Francisco.
Elaine is lucky to have John with her
this time. Her solo stage appearance
last year was very unfortunate.
* * * *
Luise Rainer has settled her differ
ences with M-G-M and is preparing a
return to the camera, with Melvyn
Douglas, in “Frou Frou.” . . . “Trailer
Romance.” by Ursula Parrott, will
star Herbert Marshall, with Ginger
Rogers. Incidentally, Jimmy Cagney's
tap dancing lessons already have borne
fruit. He dances opposite Ginger in
“On Your Toes.” . . . Norma Shearer
has been paged for the top spot in
Hollywood’s version of "The Women,”
DANCING.
PEYTON PENN~ STUDIO. 1745 F st. n.w..
Met. 3030. Modern dancing, ballroom a
specialty. Phone evenings lor appt._
Prof, and Mrs. L. Acher. Private lessons
by appointment. Classes now forming.
1213 G St^N.W. Nat. S!>1«. Jst. lOOO^lV
8 LESSONS, *6 °°
Ballet—Tan—Ballroom
THE JACK ROLLINS STUDIOS,
1011 Conn, Ave. Dee. 3770
Baltimore—Pittsburgh—Cincinnati
DON MARTINI
Waits—Foxtrot—Tango—Rhumba
CULTURED. TALENTED TEACHERS
Private Lessons. Moderate Rates.’
1011 II Ci Hill National 3767
■ Oil n Oil Haiti District 2838
Don Martini Conducts This Branch
s Ethel M. Fistere,
Former
Arthur
Murray
Teacher
—invites you to visit her auirt and
friendly studio for a free dance
analysis Studio open 10 to 10.
Ballroom Dancing
Exclusively 9
1223 Connecticut Avenue PI. 2460
25c *o 1 P-M. • 35c I to 5:30 • Nights 40c Bole., 66c Orch. & Mezz. • Children under 12,25c
mMMezz&M ib
B"S^Lh h
pysfc^
1 w**!f* (Srfei
B 4J M *»• 45
y*
pfe£ “everybodysiN^tMtUmlulaigmuhd-fi^b*ice|
successful New York play about a
bunch of pretty awful females.
(Coprrlsht, lB38.br tfee North Amerltm
Newspaper .Alliance, Inc.)
Madeleine Carroll
With Henry Fonda.
J-JENRY FONDA has been selected
for the leading male role opposite
Madeleine Carroll in the new Walter
Wanger production, tentatively titled
"The River Is Blue." The film is
being readied for the cameras within
three weeks and Willem Dieterle
has been borrowed from Warner Bros,
to direct and to supervise the final
story script.
“The River Is Blue” dramatizes a
modem day theme and is the first of
the pictures on Mr. Wanger’s new
season's schedule. It will be released
through United Artists.
untif
^^^^LAST 2 DAYS^^^*
HOME ONLY fED
\ YOUNG ONCE” WEEMS
Air* SSL & ORCH.
; \ "rtf"*'., ?SSntodal*M?5
1 CC&M rANKiK
\ 1 / Prim /
—■'■■■# Tilpj.-2h /
r "SWING —^- n
\ YOUR LADY"
PINKY TOMLIN
\as uemIn /
^ Ifat fOBltTBW
yDAYS
V-^IUBBI I IK'« MBSt^^
( “PENITENTIARY”
\ A Ctiwnka Putuu WitM f
\_Mm MWAm-Wilter CONNOUT /
/^YtaNMBAltatltt«I /
\ LOMBARD McMURRAY /
\ I« PiMIMIAt t Cvmtdy I
i^TrueConfesslon” i
TODAY AT 2:30
NIGHT AT 8:30
MAX CORDON
•h **ociatomwi/& SAM H. HARRIS
Save me ,
THE WAIVE
A new tented? b" Katherine Dayton.
Eeee., *2.75, *2.20. *1.65. *1.10, 55r.
Wed. Mat.. *1.65. *1.10. 55*. Sat.
Mat.. S2.20, SI.65. SI.10. 55e. Joel. Tax
WEEK BEO. NEXT MONDAY
ALEX YOKEL Prcaenta
Orson WoUos’ Maroiry Tboatro
production at
“JULIUS CAESAR”
By William Sbakeaaeara
Stated by Oraon Wellea
Etc*.. *2.75. S2.20. *1.65. S1.10. *5*.
Wed Mat.. *1.65. *1.16. »5e.
Sat. Mat.. *2.20. SI.65. *1.10. 05e.
(Inrludint Tax)
Mall Ordera Now—Seat Sale Tmor.
* BURTON
HOLMES
TONIGHT, 8:15
Final in Travel Serin
"DOWN TO RIO, THROUGH
MEXICO, OVER THE ANDES."
At Roosevelt High School
13th and Allison Sts. N.W.
Tickets—50c. 75c and $1.00 at Mrs.
Dorsey s Bureau In Droop s. 1300 O St.
N -W. Natl. 7151. After 7 p.m. at Roose
velt Auditorium.___
marionettes: i
PIERCE HALL
16th and Harvard Sti. N.W.
“ALADDIN”
4:00 P.M.—Feb. 10. 1938—8:30 P.M.
Chanty Benefit—Admission. Kite to 65e
STUDIO MARIONETTES.
Phone Dist. *969
TRANS-LUX MdlkLtea
NEWS IN PICTURES. ft
FOREIGN, NATIONAL. - . ■
LOCAL, "STOCKHOLM” IJJ/, J
JjjjSESHOR^UBJECTsjfflJ
rvaasBap^fTn2*35*””
/ NOW
( MISS ST. LOUIS of 1937
BKO KEITHS
A WASHINGTON INSTITUTION
Starting FRIDAY we will proudly present. .
* "the greatest motion picture ever made"
WALT DISNEY'S
i
SEVEN SEDWARFS"
A full length feature
in multiplane technicolor
* WESTBROOK PEGLER in hi«
Syndicated column in the Wash. Poet
Distributed by IKO IADIO HCTUItS
NOW SHOWING • “RADIO CITY REVELS" with BOB BURNS
I
ACADEMY °f p*r&£‘ .sr?.d ST,0BUT
E. Lawrence Phillips’ Theatre Beautiful
Continuous From 4:30 P.M.
WARNER BAXTER and JOAN BENNETT
in W’alter Wanger's
“VOGUES OF 1938.”
WILL HAY in
“Where There’s a Will,”
_Wit h_LILLI_PALMER._
PADA1INA Uth A S. C. Are. S.E.
LAKUUnA Air-Conditioned
GEORGE BRENT in • MOUNTAIN JUS
TICE." and "THE LADY ESCAPES.’’
non C Home ol Mlrroohonlc Sound
UKUX Penna. Are. at 31st St.
Matinees Tues.. Thurs.. Sat., Sun.
OSCAR HOMOLKA, PRANCES FARMER
in "EBB TIDE." Popeye “A New
Day.” U. S. Pub. Health Serv. Don't
Fail to See This. ____
FklTMD A DTDN 1343 Wisconsin Are.
UUmAKlUn Air-Conditioned
GRETA GARBO, CHARLES BOYER In
"CONQUEST.''_News.__
FAIRLAWN Air-Conditioned
JEANETTE MacDONALD. • THE FIREFLY."
rnNPDrCC Nlehels Are. A
lUnUnCOJ Portland St. S.E.
BARBARA STANWYCK in "STELLA
DALLAS.”
i inn 3227 m s‘- n.w.
LJUVr Double Feature
JACK HALEY. ROCHELLE HUDSON In
• SHE HAD TO EAT." Also GEORGE
HOUSTON in "WALLABY JIM OF THE
ISLAND.”
I ITTI P 80S 9th St. N.W.
U11LC Air-Conditioned
American Premier of
“WHIRLPOOL.”
DDINCCCC in® ■ st. n.e.
rlUnLLoS Double Feature.
BARBARA STANWYCK In "STELLA
DALLAS " RAMON NOVARRO in "THE
_SHEIK_STEPS OUT ”__
crrn ~ 8344 Georgia Are.
jlw Silver Soring. Md.
Continuous From K:00 P.M.
“GREAT GARRICK,”
BRIAN AHERNE. OLIVIA De HAVILLAND.
CTANTAN 8th and C Sta. N.E.
JlAniuIi Finest Sound Equipment
Continuous From 5:30 P.M.
GARY COOPER and GEORGE RAFT in
“SOULS AT SEA.”
“MEET THE BOY FRIEND.”
With DAVID CARLYLE. CAROL HUGHES.
T A If AM A 4th and Butternut Sts.
I ANUIT1A_ No Parking Troublei
BETTE DAVIS in
“IT’S LOVE I’M AFTER.”
GENE AUTRY in
“Springtime in the Rockies.”
~ HIPPODROME Double Feature
Leo Carrillo. "The Barrier.” Claire
Trevor. "Big Town Girl."
CAMEO MT- 'S1 MD
RAY MILLAND and
fe FRANCES FARMER in
P “EBB TIDE.”
A Dr A nr HYATTSVTT.LE. MD.
k_ AKLAUE. Today-Tomor.
W NELSON EDDY and
5 ELEANOR POWELL in
S “ROSALIE.”
12 RICHMOND- ALEXANDRIA. V
® Mae West. “Every Day’s a Holiday.”
O REED ALEXANDRIA, VA.
‘S3 Dorothy Lamour and Jon Hall in
U "Hurricane.’’
4) Free Parking Space—800 Cars.
a lfim ROCKVILLE. MD.
Q jnlLU Double Feature
Will Rogera, "Judge Priest.” Ger
trude Michael. “Sophie Lang Goes
Weat.”
MARLBORO
Today
P»t O'Brltn. "Bick in Circulation."
Alio Rraddock-Parr Fight Films.
1 „ AMBASSADOR kT & *«&'<
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52 CALVERT 232*_wirco.,n»,» An.
OC ' Cleveland 2345
W FRED Aa&ffiS* *.{S? Wan FON
H —taine. ‘ DAMSEL IN DISTRESS."
<1 CENTRAL i;3 9th Rt- N.*r
Phone Met. 2841
UU 9oen. 1100 A.M.
»tARD and FREDRIC
—MARCH in "NOTHING SACRED "
COLONY 493A c»- 5«rN.w.
c/a raTmil
2 HOME ,2 ahC8si‘88NK
gg KATHARINE HEPBURN and GINGER
60 oSTi'9.E r)OOR." AlS
_Two-Reel Cartoon.
PENN 650 pfnn- Avenue S.E.
W * Lilli Lincoln 2I7»
IS Matinee. 2:00 P.M
5 FRRD ASTAIRE and JOAN FON
flc —TAINE. DAMSEL IN DISTRESS "
< SAVOY 3°Pho„,e“co|8,4o£iW:
SHERMAN ji*
p TivoLr;‘hpsb‘infKrk,%,r,w
fS FRED A»RT2nTPJ^N FON
"t _TAINE. "DAMSEL IN DISTREBS "
Ij UPTOWN Conn Aea and
TT 9. Newark St. N.W.
Cleveland .710©

kPthKiINE HE,PBURNrandCG®R
_ROGERS in "STAOE_DOOR."
NEWTON ,2,V."dN1i?wSir
“ROSALIE,” ■
ELEANOR POWELL. NELSON EDDY
^ JESSE THEATER ,8&® »‘
J2 4I_, Double Feature.
06 She Married an Artist,”
tiJ JOHN BOLES and LULI DESTE
«g “BEAU HUNKS,”
S .. STAN LAUREL, OLIVER HARDY.
S SYLVAN c
iT “LOVEONTOAST.”
OS STELLA ARDLER. JOHH PAYNE.
U3 Life Begins With Love,”
BQ
PALM THEATER »«***•
“ROSALIE,”
ELEANOR POWELL. NEL8QN EDDY
ARLINGTON, VA.
WILSON «720 Wilton Med.
EDWARD G. ROBINSON® “S'nJ VJAMES
STEWART in "THE LAST OANOOTER "
ASHTON CUrendon, Va.
FIREFLY ^A ETTE M*CDONALD
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
STATE N<WORRU?s ° LEE
JOEL McCREA and i ROBERT YOUNG
BOB BURNS in JAMES STEWART In
“WELLS FARGO." I NAV1q<Sd " AN°
STATE-BETHESDA^M!7^®
BARBARA STANWYCK in
“BREAKFAST FOR TWO.”
JOHN LITEL in
“ALCATRAZ ISLAND."

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