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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, February 14, 1938, Image 5

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Former Attorney General of
Tennessee Was Killed by
* Hit-Run Driver.
Held in Hit-Run Death
Martin L. Bray, jr„ Virginia carpenter, who surrenaerea
Saturday night six hours after George W. Sutton, former Ten
nessee attorney general, was killed by a hit-run driver, is shown
being escorted into No. 1 precinct, where he was transferred
from No. 11. —Star Staff Photo.
An inquest will be held tomorrow in
the hit-run death "Saturday night of
George W. Sutton. 74, former Ten
nessee attorney general, who war,
•truck in a safety zone at Sixth street
and Pennsylvania avenue.
Held in connection with the case
is Martin L. Bray, 30-.vear-old Vienna,
Va., carpenter, who surrendered to
police after a six-hour hunt, begun
at the time of the fatal accident and
pressed following reports of four other
mishaps involving fleeing drivers. A
10-year-old boy also was hurt.
At the first precinct, where he was
taken for questioning after he gave
himself up at No. 11 station, Bray
was said by Detective Sergt. William
J. Liverman to have made five verbal
•tatements and two written ones, all
varying. The detective said he ad
mitted being in an accident on Penn
sylvania avenue N.W., but said that
it was at Fourth street and that an
other machine and not a pedestrian
was involved.
Traced hy Tag Numbers.
Police said the car Bray was driving
Saturday night, traced after its tag
numbers were obtained by a taxi
driver who saw Mr. Sutton knocked 60
feet, was later found in the Southeast
section. They said it was blood-spotted
and damaged in front and that an
^eyeglass lens, believed to have been
Mr. Sutton's, was wedged between the
fender and the radiator. After parking
the machine, Bray, police said, at
tempted to repair the damage.
He reported to the precinct after
going to the home of a friend. Ernest
A. Tobin, 2314 Park place S.E., and
telling him he was "in trouble.”
Police said Bray has a traffic rec
ord containing a number of violations,
one for driving while drunk, two for
speeding and one for driving on the
wrong side of the street.
Bray's wife gave birth to a son less
jthan two weeks ago and Is still con
fined to Columbia Hospital.
The youth also struck by a hit-run
driver was Charles R. Doyle, 10, of
821 I street S.E He was bruised
and shaken up from the accident,
which happened as he was leaving
his grandmother's home, near his own.
Property Damage.
The other cases in which fleeing
drivers figured resulted in only prop
erty damage, police said.
Mr. Sutton, father of George O.
Sutton, 7716 Fourteenth street N.W.,
'served as attorney general for Ten
nessee from 1892 to 1900. He had
returned to the city Saturday night
from a trip to New York, registered
at the Continental oHtel and was out
for a walk when struck.
Funeral services for the one-time
Attorney General were to be held at
4 p.m. today at Hines undertaking
establishment. The body then was tc
be taken to Knoxville, Tenn., hi* for
mer home, for burial.
In an accident at Seventh and E
streets N.W. today, a man identified
as Isaac Zerke, 72, of 3525 Davenport
street N.W., was injured, perhaps
seriously. He was unconscious when"
taken to Emergency Hospital and the
extent of his injuries was not imme
diately determined- A woman said to
have driven the striking car was not
identified by police.
j Policeman Herbert C. Wright, 31.
I No. 12 precinct, was cut and bruised
! yesterday when he was struck from
behind while riding his motor cycle on
Bladensburg roid N.E. near South
Dakota avenue. He was taken to
Casualty Hospital. The car which
struck him. police said, was operated
j by Leroy W. Decker, 22, of 1105 Fif
I teenth street N.W.
Several other accidents were re
| ported, but none of the* victims was
believed seriously injured.
*-•-.. ■
J. E. KIRWAN, 87, DIES
CENTREVILLE. Md„ Fed. 14 </P).—
J. E Kirwan, 87. member of the
State Senate from Queen Anne County
from 1910 to 1918, died of pneumonia
yesterday in his home at Chester on
Kent Island.
He was a charter member of the
board of directors of the Centreville
National Bank and was a trustee of
the Queen Anne* County home. Fu
neral service* will be conducted to
morrow.
Good Price to Farmer Without
*
. Gouging Buyer, Farm Bill Aim
By the Associated Press.
A simple purpose. Agriculture De
partment officials said today lies be
hind the complicated language of the
new crop control bill: It is to assure
good prices for the farmer without
gouging the consumer.
Supporters of the measure, at
^tempting to achieve that goal, have
proposed to give the Secretary of
Agriculture power to determine just
how much wheat, com. cotton, tobacco
and rice should be grown to meet the
country's needs.
This figure would be divided among
various States, then among counties,
and finally among individual farms.
If supplies are large and prices low,
farmers could obtain Government
loans on stored products instead of
* selling them at the low prices. When
ever these stored supplies and indi
cated production climbed above total
outlined by the law. producers could
vote to impose sales limits.
The Secretary is directed under the
legislation to protect consumers
against short supplies and high prices
by releasing these stored supplies
When needed.
Costs of the new program are not
listed in the bill itself. It merely pro
vides that benefit payments shall be
limited to available funds. These have
averaged about *500.000,000 in recent
years for the Soil Conservation Act.
“Only part of this amount will go to
the five major crops.
Legislators said the marketing
quotas on sales limits could operate
this year on cotton, tobacco and corn,
if growers of these crops voted them.
One provision of the new farm 010
gram authorizes a start In all-risk
Government crop insurance on wheat
i in 1939. For this the bill authorize*
| $6,000,000 administrative costs and a
| $20,000,000 reserve.
Legislators said that if the wheat
I insurance experiment is successful.
! this feature may be extended to other
I crops.
i Four large Government laboratories
to develop new markets and uses for
all farm products are authorized by
the act. Each of these would jeceive
$1,000,000 annually.
Another provision awards $1,000,000
annually to the Commerce Depart
ment to stimulate uses of farm prod
I ucts.
The bill also changes the size of
some benefit checks under Federal
. farm programs. Those which normal
ly would be under $200 will be stepped
; up. A maximum of $10,000 will
; operate after this year.
I
because of its gentle action on
the bowels. Don't confuse Nujol
with unknown products.
INSIST ON GENUINE NUJOL
Cmo. IN?. Simm !m.
i
195
A Colonial lowboy model in mahogany at
a price that's, much less than you would EASY
expect to pay for an instrument of this
quality. Full keyboard . .. very handsome
design. Your Piano
in Trado
SERGT. WILLIAMS
. RITES TOMORROW
Member* of Metropolitan Police
Force Will Be Honorary and
Active Pallbearer*.
Funeral services for Sergt. Eslie
Williams, ST, veteran officer of the
traffic division of the Metropolitan
Police, who died Saturday night in
Emergency Hospital, Fill be held at
10 a.m. tomorrow in the. .Catholic
Church of the Nativity, following brief
services in Hines funeral "home, 2901
Fourteenth street N.W. Burial will be
in Mount Olivet Cemetery. Members
of the Metropolitan Police will serve
as honorary and active pallbearers.
Sergt. Williams was a veteran of
some 31 years’ service on the force,
about the last 12 of which had been
spent as sergeant with the traffic divi
sion. When on duty he had been regu
larly assigned to escort President
Roosevelt whenever the latter went
through the city. He also had escorted
Presidents at several inaugurations
and had received numerous commenda
tions for the manner in which he
handled police details while on such
duties.
Sergt. Williams, who lived at 1510
Buchanan street N.W., was stricken
with a throat infection 11 days ago.
Pneumonia and other complications
developed. He had been given five
blood transfusions, the last one late
Saturday. Fellow officers gave tha
blood for the transfusions.
Howard U. to Hear Choir.
Milton Boyce, music director at
Catholic University, will take his choir
of nine men to Howard University
for a musical program sponsored by
the Musicians’ Guild of Washington
in Rankin Memorial Chapel tomor
row at 8 p.m. In addition to the
concert program, he will talk on “Mu
sic of the Catholic Church,” giving
illustrations .of music for religious
feast days.
Officer Reads
Bible Out Loud
For Tardiness
Something new In discipline is
creeping Into the Police Department
If the case of Pvt. Wade W. Carter,
No. 13 precinct, who was late for roll
call yesterday, can be taken as a
precedent. *
For his tardiness, Officer Carter
read aloud to his fellow officers a
chapter fror. Genesis, the Bible be*
ing one donated by a Bible society
distributed to police precincts recently
through the Washington Federation
of Churches.
It was not by order that the Bible*
reading came about, but by sugges*
tion of another policeman. Capt 8.
J. Marks acquiesced and Indicated
the same course may be followed in
the future.
Cherry Tree* Bloom.
ROCKPORT, Ind., Feb. 14 UP).—
Cherry trees in Dalton Hayden’s yard
here apparently thought spring was
here and bloomed yesterday as the
,temperature hit 70. Pussy willows
forsythia and jasmine also were In
bloom.
“Acidity Makes;
My Joints Ache”
Don't let arthritis settle in your
bones. Doctors recommend a
natural alkaline water that tends
to neutralize pain-causing arids.
Phone Nat. 8045 for information
and booklet.
MOUNTAIN VALLEY
MINERAL WATER
] from Hot Spring«, Arkantao
' 1105 K N.W. Phone NAt. 8015
I A. KAHN INC.
Celebrating at the Same Address
for the 46th Consecutive Year
46th
ANNIVERSARY
SALE
The Jewelry Gift Store for all the People
Only once a year we hold a sale—at Anniversary Time.
During this yearly event, we take regular items from
our stock and offer them at greatly reduced prices.
Genuine, Substantial Savings. Reflecting a
Value-Giving Service of 46 Continuous
Years to the Washington Public
*
ANNIVERSARY REDUCTIONS
Sterling Silver Hellowere
now 20 % to 33 Vs % off
Bowls, Sandwich Trays, Water Pitchers,
Vases, Compotes, Candle Sticks, etc.
Sterling Silver Tea Sets
now 20% off
Many interesting patterns from which to
make your selection.
Silver Plated Holloware
now 25 % to 33 Vs % off
Bread Trays, Sandwich Trays, Water Pitch
ers, Bowls, Compotes, Vases, etc.
. Diamond Jewelry
now 25% off
Beautifully wrought pieces, including Plati
num Diamond Watches, Bracelets, Bar-Pins,
and distinctive watches.
Lamps
now 25% to 50% off
The latest conception of the home deco
rated skill to blfend with any furnishings.
Gift Ware Items
. now 25% to 50% off
Book Ends, Smoking Sets, Liquor Sets and
numerous other items.
Jewdry Items
now 25% off
Crosses and Chains, Bracelets, Compotes,
Cuff Links, Scarf Pins, Cigarette Cases, etc.
Hand Wrought Aluminumware
now 25% off
Trays and Bowls in endless variety of sizes.
Sport, Fish and Fruit designs.
Sterling Silver Toiletware
now 25% off
A large assortment of Comb, Brush and
Mirror Sets in Sterling Silver, Enamel, Bronze
and Gilt.
Special Tables
ODDS & ENDS
Sterling Silver Flatware
Special Close-Out Prices!
Special Gift Tables
ITEMS PRICED AT
$1 • $2 • $3
Of special interest will be the tables
offering greatly reduced prices on gift
novelties, silverware, and, glassware
items. Proportionate savings on scores
of other items.
CHARGE ACCOUNTS INVITED!
A. KAHN INC.
Arthur J. Sundlun, President
46 YEARS AT THE SAME ADDRESS
835 F STREET
CompJete SELF-SERVICE
Grocery and Meat Market
1717 King St., Alexandria, Va.
Other American Self-Service Markets at
Glebe Road b Washington Blvd., Arlington, Va.
2744 14th St. N.W. and 1652 Columbia Road N.W.
Qetd Seat Finest Quality __
MACARONI or SPAGHETTI» 5ci
I
Creamy Wisconsin j
Cheese
4SCO Tomato Puree con 5e
f - "
"heat-flo" roasted
WIN-CREST
Coffee
2 31'
PHILLIPS' BEANS ,.EC
SPAGHETTI fir PEA or VEGETABLE SOUP ^
Phillips Vegetable Soup large can 9e
Beit Pure
LARD
lb. IOC

Pearl Hominy or Grit* 3 lbs. 10e
Glenwood Spaghetti; with sauce 2 cans 15e
Glen Cove Clam Chowder 3 cans 25c
Glen Cove Pea Soup; serve as is 3 cans 25c
Gorton s Ready-to-Fry Codfish can 13c
Treesweet Lemon Juice 2 8 oz. cans 25c
Farmdafe £VAP.
MILK
4SC0 Finest Quality
PEANUT BUTTER 2^29'
Meoty
5? Santa Clara ^
PRUNES;
4SC0 Slowly Cooked
BEANS
Witfc Pork and Tam. Sauce
16 0Z.
can
Big 28 ox. eon 9c
PEARS1
Stuffed Spanish
OLIVES
f1
Mb Brown's Cucumber Pickles 2 iars 27e
Green's Peppermint Patties lb. pkg. 19c
Chocolate Magnolias (Cokes) ib. 15c
Seedless Californio Raisins 2 pkgs. 15c
4SC0 Fancy Long-Groin Rice lb. pkg. 10c
Seeded California Raisins * pkg 10c
Fame Concentrated
Tomato Juieo
2 can* 15c i
Each can make* a quart
of Tomato Jutct
GLENWOOD HOME-STYLE
APPLE SAUCE 2 15C
Wheoties pn*. lie
Bisquick 17c
Cocomolt ’i.i” 23c
Wesson Oil ;*n 25c
KING MIDAS lb. 1 E*
NOODLES bog |5C
Col. Diamond ^ E
WALNUTS *•
Heins (ex. A kinds I
SOUPS 2 cans 25c \
Fell Naptha Soap 2 cakes 9c
Felt Soap Chips Ige. pkg. 21c
Woodbury's Soap 2 cakes 15e
Scrub Brushes ea. 10c-15c
Red Star Brooms ea. 29c
G-E Bulbs 15-30-60-W 10c
Masda Bulbs; 25-40-50W 15c
AMERICAN
TOILET TISSUE
3 14'.
ASCO Extra Strength
AMMONIA
quart ^ ^\C reg.
bot. |y 15c
Marco Dog Food
2 ’t" 15c
Why Not Have a Cherry Pie for Cherry Week?
*%Sr CHERRIES 2-29c
Red Cocktail Cherries 3 oz. bot. 9c; 6 oz. bot. 17c
Try the Softer, Square Loaf with the Better Flavor—
Nu-Twist BREAD Oc
Greet for sandwiches and toast. Cello, wrapped. ~
47th Anniversary Sale Produce Values
LARGE, RIPE BEST MAINE WHITE
BANANAS POTATOES
»5« 10"”19c
Largo Fancy Calory ■talk IOC I STAYMAN j
Best Now Potatoes A**15c WINES^
Firm Yellow Onions »• 5c APPLES
Fresh Croon Spinach 3^ 19c -
Largo Fla. Oranges 25c D 8 II
Finest Crisp Iceberg 7
LETTUCE”"
47th Anniversary Savings on Quality Meats
Briggi Skinlew AJP.
FRANKS b‘ ill®
-h- 25c
Spiced Luncheon ,, AA.
MEAT lb Z“®
Genuine Lamb
SHOULDER
LAMB CHOPS
IV
SHOULDER df.
•OAST »>■ 15°
Tender Savory
STEAKS
ROUND >»• 29*
SIRLOIN »> 33*
^ 3 5C
Frashly Ground 4 f|*
BEEF lb‘ 13*
Plato Boilinf 1L 4 Ag
BEEF_IL
CUBES lb~ 25°
u vtT lb-19c
FRESH, MEATY
SPARE
RIBS
lb 17e
Leon Stewing
lb. 10c
Lone cut
Sauer
kraut
PrtoM Uwlln Catfl WllMtir CImIu. W»ikta*t»a, D. C.J
i

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