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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 08, 1938, Image 29

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“Brother Rat” Again Seen
On National Stage
Spirited Comedy of College Life
Has Lost None of Verve
Through Cast Changes.
By JAY CARMODY.
(• T"N ROTHER RAT,” that bubbling comedy of life at Virginia Military
I—X Institute, came back to the National Theater last night at popular
I j prices and, despite several changer, in the cast, it is the same elfln,
^ high-spirited number that it was 26 or 27 weeks ago when it
played the same house. After seeing Eddie Bracken swish through the role
of the daft, arrogant and always-harassed Billy Randolph, it is hard to believe
that any one else could play it at the
aame wild pitch. Eddie Phillips, how
ever. manages to keep the character
at the level which George Abbott chose
for it when he directed the company
prior to its road tour. This depart
ment, which was entranced with June
McCoy as Claire Ramm in the origi
nal company, has the idea that Miss
Loma Beaton did slightly less well
perhaps by the little girl who is the
picture of naivete, but the practitioner
of all that is devilish. The difference
between the two players, however, is
nothing that should keep you away
from Mr. Abbott's daffy drama of
military college life.
“Brother Rat,” if any one remains
Uninformed on the subject, is a laugh
spattered story of the trials, tribula
tions, triumphs, the loves, losses and
frustrations of as spirited a group of
youngsters as the stage ever intro
duced. In spite of the fact that the
scene is a military school, the reser
vation is fairly overrun with girls; not
ordinary campus dolls, but girls with
enough character virtually to wreck a
place like that. What’s more, they do,
with the full co-operation of the ir
repressible Randolph. The character
of Randolph is the nearest thing that
has been written to a composite of the
Marx brothers, which ought to give
one a vague idea of the situations it
can create for the amusement of the
atergoers.
The dialogue of ‘‘Brother Rat,” in
cluding the best-known curtain lines
of the last several seasons, has a ten
dency to face the facts of college life
with frankness, but it is hard to imag
ine ears to which it w'ould be offensive.
It’s much too funny to get that kind
of reaction.
In its playing, beyond those men
tioned, you will like especially Claire
Hazel as the major love interest, Mary
Ella Perry as the harassed middle
aged lady with a head full of baseball
batting averages, Robert Scott as the
tormented plebe, and Marjorie Kauf
man as the girl who gave justification
lor that famous first-act curtain line.
The show has been set elaborately
and shows no conspicuous dust spots
or scuffing as a result of its long jour
ney over the road.
dr >b
PVEN luncheons of show people are
becoming colossal. That, at least,
was the case with Variety's regular
affair yesterday. Every one with
talent around contributed it gener
ously, even the Treasury, which sent
over J. F. T. O’Connor, who stole the
show, virtually his last official act
since he left last night for California.
Mr. O'Connor, who is so close to the
entertainment industry, as its personal
friend and adviser that the two are
practically synonymous, spoke very
unsolemnly. Other talent on the bill
Included ''Red" Skelton, who came
over from the Capitol to gorge on
that doughnut act of his; Dick Ware,
Dick Younts and several other acts
from the Earle's stage show, and Rob
ert Freund's Gypsy Chorus, which also
came, courtesy of Carter Barron.
The Chicago Opera Co. came up
fro mthe Rialto to demonstrate the
vocal abilities of its leading tenor and
soprano, introduced by Abe Tolkins.
Hardie Meakin, who has put on an
opulent look during the tenancy of
"Snow White” at his Keith’s Theater,
acted as king for the day. Variety
vernacular for toastmaster. Opulent
looks fit Mr. Meakin well.
* * * *
TJACKSTAGE, not Dollie Slaughter’s
radio program, but just plain
backstage, can be almost anything.
Glamorous, as glamour Itself one mo
ment, plain and homey the next. It
was plain and homey at 405, Janette
Hackett's dressing room at the Capi
tol yesterday. Between shows Miss
Hackett, who really is Mrs. John
6teele and very proud of it, was en
|}A||.p AT ARMORY
■toiler SILVER 8PRING. MO.
_ Every Evening Except
dKOTing Mon.. 7:30 to 10:30
n;_L ADMISSION _lOe
■till It SKATES _SSe
Special rate* te akatlna parties aver 40
en Tnea. ana wed.
Phono Shop. 1506S. 5. 761
~
No. 15
Keep your tire*
pioperly in
flated during
winter months. If you're not
sure how much air should be
in them, your Richfield Dealer
will tell you. Actual road tests
show that even 30% under
inflation cuts tire life in halt.
AND fQlt QUICK WINTER STAKTS
I ASK YOUR DEALER FOR BOOKLET |
ON WIWTIK DRIVING HI MTS I
I ... '
tertaining the press. She was enter
taining the press very highly without
being at all conscious of it. Between
answering questions, and asking them,
her fingers flew around with a needle
in them, or sometimes a sewing ma
chine, while she made garments (tiny
ones) for girls in her chorus.
Why should Miss Hackett make
garments, tiny or otherwise, for chorus
girls? Because next week she is go
ing to put Era Coleman, Ann Ecklund
and others of her group into a Scot
tish number. She does not like the
costumes available in commercial es
tablishments for that kind of number.
So. whipping out a needle and a sew
ing machine, she is making her own.
While Miss Hackett snipped and
stitched, the conversation ran hither
and yon about such things as stock
ballets in movie houses, her brother,
Albert Hackett, who writes for M-O-M:
her husband, Mr. Steele, who still
sings in that lyrical Irish tenor voice;
the high costs of producing even com
paratively simply shows, how nice it
would be to have a vegetable garden
as a' sideline to show business and
other items.
Tea and crumpets were the only
things missing and they were not
really missed by any one present.
‘La Boheme’
Effectively
Presented

Orchestra Alone
Fails to Give
Satisfaction.
By ALICE EVERSMAN
H j A BOHEME," the famed opera
1 version of Murger's equally
I celebrated novel, "La Vie de
JL-rf Boheme," was the third
offering of the Chicago Opera Co.
last evening at the Rialto Theater.
The entire production was given the
same scenic care that has distin
guished each of the previous operas
performed by this company. Even the
difficult scene about the Cafe Momus
was well done in spite of the cutting
of some of the action which requires
a larger space than the present stage
provides. Again the chorus took a
lively interest in all they had to do
and sang with vivacity.
In Mimi, Elda Ercole had a more
sympathetic vocal part than her debut
role of "Aida.” The higher register
of her voice is unusually fine and her
tones last evening were taken without
effort or straining of the quality. She
sang the aria of the first act with
many individual points of emphasis
which were very effective and her
acting of the entire role was full of
charm and simplicity.
The second feminine role, that of
Musetta, was dashingly portrayed by
Martha Errolle, whose costuming was
especially attractive. Her fine voice
was clear and ringing above the en
semble and the famous waits song
excellently sung.
John Chickering was. the Rudolfo
and his voice has the power possibili
ties for the role if it were better
handled. He' is not adept in acting
as yet and has a tendency to step
out of character and become a concert
singer as when singing the first act
aria or other sustained solo passages.
His three comrades, Marcello, sung
by Rocco Pandiscio, with Anthony
Meli as Shaunard, and Nino Carbon!
as Colline, sang and acted well, the
role of Marcello standing out through
the art of Mr. Pandiscio.
The orchestra was directed by Um
berto Mugnai and he had a difficult
task on his hands. Try as he would,
he could not get the proper support
for the singers and at some very
necessary moments not a sound came
out of the orchestra. It is a pity to
try to present opera with such ineffi
cient orchestral background, for it
is not fair to the singers nor to the
public, who cannot enjoy the music
to the fullest extent. So far, the chief
complaint against the Chicago Opera
Co.’s performances here which are
otherwise satisfactory as to scenery
and artists, is the poor orchestra
playing. Surely a few more rehearsals
might be had so that one need not be
distracted from the performance by
inadequate support in the instru
mental part.
LOANS
72 years of buying, selling and
lending on diamonds, jewelry, etc.
Liberal Loan* at Lawait Passible Kates
CASH FOR OLD SOLD
(Government License)
E. HEIDENHEIMER
Ettabliihtd J868
LOAN OFFICE .
SOS Kins iL WASH. STORE
Ales.. Vs.1215 H St. N.W.
g uverstujjea suites at proportionately low rates
? HAVE YOUR UPHOLSTERING DONE RIGHT AND PUT
? BACK ON ITS PROPER LINES AND PROPER SHAPE
3 BY OUR SKILLED MECHANICS, WHO HAVE BEEN
S. WITH US FOR YEARS. WHILE SPENDING MONEY,
*» GET THE BEST WORKMANSHIP YOU CAN.
1 CHAIR CANEING, PORCH ROCKERS SPLINTED
a CLAY A. ARMSTRONG
l 1235 IQHi SI. H.W. e«.ui» Mri.2062
A Topper for “Topper”?
Brian Aherne whispers those sweet nothings into Constance
Bennett’s pink, shell-like ear in “Merrily We Live,” Hal Roach’s
comedy sequel to the gay farce “Topper.” The new picture comes
to Loew's Capitol Theater Friday.
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—“Brother Rat," that very
amusing play about life at V. M. I.
returns: 8:30 p.m.
Earle—“Love, Honor and Behave,”
Wayne Morris and Priscilla Lane form
a new romantic team: 11:15 a.m., 1:40.
4:25, 7:15 and 10 p.m. Stage shows:
12:40, 3:30, 6:15 and 9:05 p.m.
Capitol—“Romance in the Dark,"
“Continental" musical with Swarth
out. Boles, Barrymore: 11 a.m., 1:45,
4:30, 7:25 and 10 p.m. Stage shows:
12:40, 3:25, 6:20 and 9:05 p.m.
Metropolitan—“Gold Is Where You
Find It,” another empire-builders’
drama: 11 a.m., 1:05, 3:10, 5:20, 7:25
and 9:35 p.m..
Colombia—“The Baroness and the
Butler,” Bill Powell joins Annabella in
her first American-made film: 11:45
a.m., 1:45, 3:45, 5:50, 7:50 and 9:50
p.m.
Palace—“Happy Landing," skating
Sonja returns: 12 m., 2:25, 4:45, 7:10
and 9:35 p.m.
Keith’s—“Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs,” film history’s greatest
sensation—that’s all: 11:51 a.m., 1:51,
3:51, 5:51, 7:51 and 9:51 p.m.
Little—'“Peter the First,” Soviet
screen biography of a vigorous czar,
with subtitles in English: 11 a.m.,
1:07, 3:14, 5:21, 7:28 and 9:36 p.m.
No Early Steak
For Douglas.
^LEXANDER HALL Is one director
who prefers to film his screen
stories in sequence. That is, he likes
to shoot the first scene in a picture
first and the last scene last. In his
current assignment, "There's Always
a Woman," co-starring Joan Blondell
and Melvyn Douglas, he is following
this routine, maintaining it is easier
for the actors to sustain Jthe feeling
of the story.
One scene, however, was not shot
in actual sequence. It shows Douglas
in a swank cafe, eating a huge steak
with the greatest of relish. Under
normal circumstances the scene would
have been played early one recent
morning. But Douglas begged off.
"Who can enjoy a steak early in
the morning?" he demanded. “At
last, make it at noon.”
Hall agreed with the star. He “shot
around” the scene until nearly noon.
Then a chef who was standing by
prepared a 3-inch steak and all the
trimmings and Douglas began to
"act.”
Play ‘Little Women.*
'T'HE Mount Vernon Players will
present Louisa Alcott’s “Little
Women” three nights this week, to
morrow, Thursday and Friday, at the
church hall.
■_AMUSEMENTS. __ AMUSEMENTS._ _AMUSEMENTS._
fUNNIEST FILM
OU EVER SAW/
Connie Bennett is
funnier and more
Lalluring than she
was in " Topper1"
From Coast to Coast the news flashes
about a new comedy that’s a positive
RIOT on celluloid!...You’ll roll in the
aisles laughing—as the wacky Kilbourne
family goes hay-wire—with daughter
falling in love with the tramp (author in
disguise) that merry fortune left on the
doorstep ... Laugh till the cows come
home—it’s the scream of all time!
HAL ROACH presents
Constance BENNETT
BRIAN AHERNE
ml*
kk^BMP™;L ALAN MOWBRAY |HH E9|
■KF BILLIE BURKE*PATSY KELLY H|
ANN DVORAK > TOM BROWN
I BONITA GRANVILLE I Sctmii May by Eddio Moran and Jack Jovno j
W I UADIflDIC DAIIDCAII ■ ItmHJfcyNORMANLMdEOD • MHTONN.BtEN,(me***fntmm
■ WftnJUnlt KAmPtAU ■ A ttotn-Goldwyn-May* Pkfvn
STARTS FRIDAY»LOEW S CAPITOL
Suburb Gets
New House
Next Fall
Wilcox Expands
Silver Spring
Operations.
GROUND will be broken this
week tor another link in the
chain of Washington’s subur
ban theaters—the Silver, ip
Silver Spring, Md. To be operated
by W. E. S. Wilcox, veteran local
showman, the new house is to form
the key building in a commercial cen
ter comprising 20 stores and covering
approximately 50,000 square feet. To
tal cost of the project has been set at
$300,000, with the theater accounting
for approximately $130,000 of this
amount. It will be the largest com
mercial building operation of its kind
in the metropolitan area..
The Silver is to be erected on the
northeast corner of the Georgia ave
nue-Colesville pike intersection. It
will accommodate 1,000 patrons on a
single floor and Incorporate such fea
tures as air conditioning, indirect
lighting and wide-spaced opera chairs.
A large parking area has been in
cluded in plans for the development.
John Eberson, leading theater designer
in the East, is the architect.
"Willie" Wilcox, who was once en
gaged in the phonograph business in
his native London, has been known
long and favorably here as the opera
tor of the Seco, in Silver Spring, over
which he will retain control. Active
in affairs of the Variety Club, he has
been a member of the Board of Gov
ernors and was tendered one of the
_DANCING.
DanceConscious Bachelors
consult Ethel M. Fls
tere. former Arthur
Murray teacher, for
auest lesson.
Open to to 10—DI». 2100
Studio 1223 Connecticut Avenue
Baltimore—Pittsburgh—Cincinnati
DON BARTINI
Walts—Fox Trot—Tsnco—Rhumba
CULTURED. TALENTED TEACHERS.
Private Lessons. Moderate Ratetl
fl ft I I U CT y HI Natlonal370?
IOIN n 91s Ms me District 2838
_DonMarttnlConductiThii _Branch_
DANCE TO
POPULARITY
In (hr socialised world of
lodar dancing Is one of the
paramount requisites to
popularity. Become a poised,
up-to-date dancer as many
social leaders have by learn
ing to dance well at Leroy
H. Thayer Stadias.
Come (n lor e Complimen
tary Quest Lesson and
Dance Anatviil
Geroif H.
1215 Connecticut Avenue
MEtropoNton 4121 >
club's most enthusiastic testimonial
dinners in 1036.
The Alexander Realty Co. is listed
as the property owner, the MOhler
Construction Co. is handling the proj
ect and the opening date has been
set as September 1.
Even Fighting Bull
Rates /Stand-Ins.
'"T'ROPICO,” a Mexican ring bull,
and four stand-ins have arrived
in Hollywood from Mexico for work In
"Tropic Holiday,’’ in which they will
appear with Martha Raye in a bull
AMUSEMENTS.
TON ITE—RIALTO
Samson & Delila
Ercols • PaaJisela * Erralla
*
OPERATIC DEBUT
Frank Parker
IN
“LA TRAVIATA”
WED. EVE.
Thurs. Eve.—Faust
MARTHA ERROLLE
LeonoraCorona
a bar Matrapalitaa Opara Rala
TOSCA
FRI. EVE—8:30
Sat. Mat.—Rigoletto
Sat. Eve.—Butterfly
Tickets, $1.65, $1.10
T. Arthur Smith. 910 G St. NA. 37M
Rialto Theater, Bos Office. NA. 0095
| TONIGHT CQNSTITITION HALL |
NATIONAL SYMPHONY
In Joint Performance with
Col. W. de Basil *
BALLET RUSSE
DE MONTE CARLO
Four Colorful Ballots!
The Hundred Kisses _d'Erlanter
Symphonic Fantastlqua_Berlioi
Afternoon of a Faun_Debussy
Cimaroslana_Cimarosa
Tickets: SI to S3. Now on sale at box
office, Julius Garfinckel de Co. Store.
NA. 7310. or after 7 P.M. at hall.
ME. 2661. C. C. Cappel. Mar.
A Constitution Hall. Thura.. March
B 10th. ft:30 P.M.
I Si MANN
■ IN PERSON
WH Tickets at Mrs. Doraey’s Bureau.
H 1300 G (Droop’s) NAt. 7151
S3e. 51.10. SI .05._
light sequence. The animals were
transported by trucks to the Para
mount ranch, where a bull ring set
is Jming constructed for Martha's
debut as a lady matador in the Mexi
can musical film.
"Troplco" is a genuine Mexican
fighting bull, and hi* stand-ins also
possess belligerent natures. Each had
his own stall on the trip from Mexico
to Hollywood so that they would not
Injure each other. The bulls, valued
at $1,000 each, were shipped from '
their native ranch through El Paso,
Tex.
’ AMUSEMENTS..
ril NOW... tooJfsomh n.esAjt. tjf;
CM* SWARTHOUT
V . M. BOLES
i Joke BARRYMORE %
m B Bs ttrss samss* igamii wi* v>
m 'RoaAKt in tfct Dirk' I
ON THE STAEE A
” I
m N0W"ff«j»pi#w!TA head! P”
I SONJA HENIE
P HAPPY LAHDIN6*
with DON AMECHE
J JEAN HERSNOLT l >
m POWELL •AMHABELU
L Tkc lartRMC tNth litltr* h J
^^2^5E2I£■S3^«»*,
!| OOoSoPSN 10:4s AAA.
4™W££KJ
I C\ WALT RltRET'S MIRACLE RICTURE
M$nowwhi
Mflt/ ANO TMK
Sj SEVEN
P DWARFS
I ADDED NEW EDITION
I "MARCH of TIME"
I CmttZtf... *
II ERTNRRWE RERCURE • CARET
|M CRART B “RRIRRIMC UR RUT
TOWN HALL
NORMAN
THOMAS
’’The Choice Before Ue”
Ran., Mar. 13th.—KUlta Theater 8:13
Tickets. 75c. *1.00, *1.15
030 Nat. Press Bids.. Mayflower and
Willard Hotels—Bex Office, Bialte Theater,
Open from 10 A.M._
Famous American baritone,
Constitat’n Hath ISth A C,
Next Ian. Alt'n., 4 P. M,
Rests Now: *1.85. Kin.
Mr*. Dorsey’s, 13M G RU
(la Drosa’a), ML 7151.
AMUSEMENTS.
V MTS TSI&bmabAJLU
I «44s«*/ (oaHSe. oj[Siring.
II "IEI MM (1ST BO SCIION" ?''h; 9 S’VL'/
I “LOVE D0N f RITA
I HONOR BESTOR RIO
& BEHAVE" nm tm
I U-U'f!r H‘' ORCH. 4 BAND
H WAYNE MORRIS p^TTT:—_
I PRISCILLA LANE /hj
Ik.. .. I
Cominc Friday
EDW. G. ROBINSON V
- In U'anur Bros Comtdy JV
■A SLIGHT CASE OF MURDER” B
—On tAj# Stair— JM
“SHOWBOAT JAMBOREE"-A Bjr
^Bucj^BubblesAOthersiy^
UST 3 BUS II COMING FRIDAY
“(OLD IS WHERE BIG BROADCAST
TOO FIND IT" OF 1938"
* •»*»* Ml f«*rcocMr fcrV* P« •«»>**•' * FV-*d» <rM
GEORGE BRENT WC.’FIELDS
Olivia BeHAVILLAND MARTHA RAYE
CLAUDE RAINS DOROTHY LAMOUR
MARfiARET UNDSAY BOB HOPE
hhst Washington"!
T. SHOWING, *
print
"THE
JFIMST
r \ SJlWT /^tTeOMlMUW*J*AT*! To
•-*v «ei »JT0 iot SI,W
>>* ■ 12:11 /M 3ra( 3d *r.«A *>» ■
cc'jntess nadja i
TRIHS'LVX
| foreign, national, I
L a?stralia*cartoon irjdl
Qjj^SHORUUBJECTSjwsJ
ACADEMY orp"&t2mrw,u’ AMBASSADOR k»£ E,,*„SS!j
E. Lawrence Phillips’ Theatre Beautiful L2Y5’ „?959R„,AND.. BEHAVE”
Continuous From 4:.m P^I. Fith ? MORRIS and PRIS
“LONDON BY NIGftT,” ^s^aiso8*}?™*.*4 fi:15*
With GEORGE MURPHY and RITA JOHN- APOI 1 A 624 H St7~N.E.
PRESTON FOSTER. JOAN FONTAINE In WALLACE BEERY0”?!! '""BAD3MAN
“YOU CAN’T BEAT LOVE.” „ o^n brimstone." shown."
CAROUNA Air-Conditioned I S ® I AVALOI I
EDDIECANTOR^n ”*UBABA GOESTO *| LOY^FRANCH^ ToTe^A
non C Home of MirroDhonle Bound S « B:no. 9:45.
ui&hL. JSSruSSi. I‘,t.?,l‘.nst- AVENUE GRANDTFfR^
MADEAY^'H^DUANYD"L°C^eSe;:BVERY ,«E^E '«jg®S
mTMDADTHN 1343 Wisconsin Are. £ _ _Shown at 6:15. 7:53. p:40.
BRIAN AHERNE and OLIVIa’d^HAVIL- “ S CALVERT ^aeveland" 2345**"
LAND in "THE GREAT GARRICK.” e Matinee. "-00 P M 2345
News and Comedies.___“■ CAROLE LOMBARD, FRED Msc
CAIDI AWN ANACOSTIA, D. C. MURRAY "TRUE CONFESSION ”
rAlKLATTfl Air-Conditioned */a Shown at 2:25. 4:15. 6:05. 7:55.
EDWARD G. ROBINSON In "THE LAST fig 9:45.__
rflNf RFW Nichols Are. * - w CENTRAL SR
LUNuKEoS Portland St. 8.E. P" .. Open 11:00 A.M.
ELEANOR POWELL In "ROSALIE." ^ CLAUDETTE COLBERT. CHARLES
■ inn -3227 M St. ti.il' S at Tf ^ 5 °
LI DU _ Double Feature ■*! —at 11 4s_g05. 4.30, 6.50. 9:15.
BARBARA STANWYCK and HERBERT X PM ANY 4033 Ga. Are. N.W.
MARSHALL in "BREAKFAST FOR fc- . Geo. 6500
TWO.” Also RALPH BYRD and DORIS “ LAMOUR, JON HALL in
WESTON in "BORN TO BE WILD." . ’THE HURRICANE." Shown at
f rmr— eos’oth'sirfTw; c/a 3 ,-B:3°-_
UllLC Air-Conditioned on HHMF 4239 C St. N.E.
ALL-STAR FOREIGN CAST. W *»UniE._ Atl. 8188
___ “PETER I.” g BWEU
PRINCESS Double Feature. I . I —5 15. 7:45 _9:5j " ^_
"IMITATION OF LIFE ' Also "ONE fig DCMM 630 Penn. Avenue 8.E.
MILE FROM HEAVEN."_rTj lEWW Lincoln 2172
cr/^A &G44 Gfnrrli Ave sm a MiltinP^» 2:00 P.M.
SECO Silver Sprinr. Md’ 5 RACY*inW‘ANTMTctt tv® ^®SJiF^
Continuous Prom 6:00 P.M. fig it «Sn . rrPAEKFSJ7!?* « ghowa
••VICTORIA THE GREAT.” ANN NEAGLE "3 —a» - 00. 3..50, 5.40^, :30, 8:25.
and ANTON WALBROOK._^ SAVOY 3030 ,4th 8t N w*
STANTON Finest Vouni *EaulDment ^ %SMB0ARR™H'''&
BULL 99 * _Shown at 5:30. 7:25. 9:30._
ROBERT MONTGOMERY. R08ALIND S o SHERIDAN
RUSSELL and ROBERT BENCHLEY In g £ Matinee. 1:00 P.M?
“LIVE, LOVE AND LEARN.” §5 TOeeft$!?S^
HIPPODROME Double Feature I ” » I_9—A-_!_!_!_'
Edw. G. Robinson. "Last Gangster." «-s TYVAI I 14th St. * Park Rd. N.W.
Will Rogers. "Judge Priest," g2 II YULI Phene Col. 1802
Hpiurn MT RAINIER. MD. Matinee. 2:06 P.M.
lAItlbU Cont. 6-11 P.M. _ S JOAN BENNETT. HENRY FONDA In
,w\ Mae West. “Every Day’s a Holiday.” 2 « "I MET MY LOVE AGAIN." Slnwn
2? ARP A nr-HYATT8VTLLE MD. n| at 2:30. 4:25.,6:15. 8:05, 9:55.
S ARlAUt Cont. 6-11 P.M. k« UPTOWN c«m. Ave and
Mickey Rooney In "Thoroughbreds oo, UFlUWn Newark St. N.W.
Don’t Cry."_ * Cleveland 5400
RIPIIMAMn ALEXANDRIA. YA Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
lULnmUnD JOAN CRAWFORD and SPENCER
W Today-Tomor.-Thurs. TRACY in "MANNEQUIN." Shown
2 FREDERIC MARCH in ** »°
£0 “BUCCANEER.” YORK N.w.,ncoi?«u3
W REED "4X?TomorVA
*g WALTER HUSTONin -..... ■« »™. ■» »:♦«.
“OF HUMAN HEARTS.” TAKOMA • No *Parkln» Troubles*"
JFree Parking Space—800 Cara. GEORGE ARLlSS in
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