OCR Interpretation


Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 09, 1938, Image 9

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1938-03-09/ed-1/seq-9/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for A-9

Fashion Marches on Toward a New High in Clothes Interest for Spring
t ~■——--—■—■——-♦ -——
Pink and Blue Are Two
Of Season’s Most
Popular Colors
Style Inspirations Have
Been Gathered From
Around the Globe.
By MARGARET WARNER.
THE march of fashion is gathering momentum each week and is speeding
along toward spring and Easter at a rapid clip. The shops are
crowded with women trying on new hats and pinning a boutonnler
or one of the new and amusing gadgets on the coat lapel, as a tribute
to the season. The pink and blueness of things is everywhere in evidence.
In fact we found the very essence of the whole spring fashion picture summed
l.n 4m am* 1(441* k«MJlr**»UU# 4U*4 M.*.A_
part of a display in one of the shop
windows. It was dainty pink bordered
In casino blue—two of the season’s
most popular colors; wild roses out
lined with splashes of blue were
scattered over it, and in one corner
a sweetly sentimental friendship verse
was printed by hand inside a scroll of
loses.
That one little hankie represents
the very feminine touch with a throw
back to the turn of the century that
is coloring the new styles and soften
ing a too severe modernism. This
trend is evident in tailored clothes,
ln'sportswear and particularly in hats,
accessories and the more dressy types
of clothes. Frills, flowers, dainty
colors, lace and ribbons in the greatest
profusion abound in every shop.
* * * *
QUTSTANDING among presenta
tions of new spring fashions last
week was the intensely interesting
collection shown by a local store in
the evening so that they might have
available practically their entire sell
ing space on one floor for seating the
audience. On authority on fashion
from one of the leading women’s
magazines came on from New York
to furnish interesting comments on
the costumes modeled, and music
by one of the city’s leading orchestras
made the evening still more enjoyable.
Fashions deriving their inspiration
from all over the globe made the
various groups distinctive. Typical of
America was the first group of casual,
happy-go-lucky clothes featuring a
very smart Gibson girl dress in two
shades of gray worn with a black
straw sailor veiled in red. The shirt
waist blouse was light gray, the skirt
a darker gray, and the belt a wide one
of red patent. Also in the beloved
American shirtwaist style was a youth
ful pleated chiffon in soft violet for
dining and dancing. The gay little
bunch of flowers that the model wore
on the top of her head like a pompon
was tacked to a velvet ribbon tied
Under the chin. This very charming
Idea was used many times during this
show. Also noted were colored kid
slippers peeping out from long skirted
evening frocks—shoes that contrasted
with the dress and looked particularly
well with prints. ,
The Chinese group showed interest
ing details of mandarin collars, man
darin sleeves wide at the wrist, coolie
hats with mushroom brims. It was
from the French group that the lovely
white net formal gown shown above
was chosen, with its very wide skirt
and chiffon sash of chartreuse and
royal blue. Net is one of the smartest
fabrics for evening. Also in this
group was a smart wood violet coat for
Juniors, with stunning tuxedo revers of
red fox. These revers turned at the
neckline and extended over the tops
ef the shoulders.
v Angelo Patri, x
X The famous authority on A
\ child psychology, now pre- A
V sents a family check-up in x
0 chart form, for all mothers X
Q and fathers who wish to 0
A better understand their 0
A children, and* to be better A
X understood in turn. Send A
\ a stamped, self-addressed A
V envelope for Mr. Patri’s X
0 "Family Check-Up,” care of X
0 the Woman’s Page of The V
A Evening Star, and your 0
A copy will be mailed to you 0
X immediately. A
——
All costumes In the French group
were noted for their sophistication,
their Directolre touches and their eve
ning glamour. With one black frock
the model wore two huge white gar
denias at the back of her coiffure, and
with another one a perfectly enormous
one was perched on the crown of the
head like a hat.
The Spanish group was full of dash
and fire, with its riot of boleros, the
gaucho blousing silhouettes, and its
use of several bright colors in one cos
tume. From this group came the flow
ered print which is shown above. The
beauty of this dress lies in its attrac
tive coloring, combining orchid, violet,
cyclamen and green with black and
white. This is one of the new prints
which uses floral patterns in stripes.
These are worked diagonally.
Also lovely in this group was a black
lace formal with roses tucked into
the fullness of the puffed sleeves and
used as a corsage. A lacey black veil
was worn like a mantilla and was
particularly effective on the dark
haired, black-eyed model.
A British group and an Easter pa
rade with every model wearing navy
blue as the popular choice for the
Easter promenade brought this show
to a most satisfactory conclusion.
* * * *
^NOTHER of those delightful Sat
urday luncheons with fashions as
an added attraction was given last
week, and this time the classics in
tailored sportswear for both town and
country were shown. Here was a
group of clothes from which any one
could pick at least three that she
would love to have, and she vrould
be sure of having them measure up
to the style standards until they were
literally worn to shreads. .
There were smart tailored shirt
waist dresses in new spring colors,
printed in small designs and plain
colors. There was a heavenly sky
blue one with a tiny white print,
that was worn with a matching blue
felt hat that tied under the chin—
a perfect picture on the blond model
who wore it. Soft blues were also
combined with rust color in belt and
hat. Bright green crepe with lots of
tucking was springlike. Novelties ap
peared in new necklines, unusual
pockets and fastenings.
String beige was prominent as a
delicate color note. That new pale
spring green was shown in a knitted
frock with a belt of Parisand and
matching band on a green felt hat.
The beauty of these knitted clothes is
that the material is knitted and the
garments then cut from the piece,
which is said to obviate any tendency
to bagginess and stretching at any
point.
Smart for town was a London tan
crepe, polka dotted in white with full
pleated skirt and blond calf belt, worn
with hat of the same shade and a
tailored top coat of beige. Active
sports clothes were shown featuring
shirts with yokes, like the men wear,
affording ample room for swinging a
golf club or badminton racket. The
group of casual, classic two-piece suits
in new spring colors was most in
viting, with roseberry a distinct fa
vorite, worn with navy blue hat and
accessories.
-•
Cleaning Porcelain.
Clean bathroom or kitchen tiles,
linoleum, porcelain tubs or sinks with
kerosene applied on a soft cloth. It
will give the surfaces added luster.
To Make Curtains.
Make the rod casings and hems of
your glass curtains the same width.
They may then be reversed to dis
tribute the wear more evenly.
*.
/"JRACEFUL bunches of grapes are truly appropriate decoration for this
’ charming luncheon set. The entire set is worked in filet crochet, a boon to
5 beginners or people eager to finish the work. The pieces measure 12x18 and
118x22 inches, respectively.
The pattern envelope contains complete, easy-to-understand illustrated
.directions, with block and space diagrams to aid you; also what crochet hook
,'and what material and how much you will need.
To obtain this pattern, send for No. 439 and inclose 15 cents in stamps
*er coin to cover service and postage. Address orders to the Needlework Editor
; of The Evening Star.
«. f ^
Lovely for Spring Evenings
Left: Bright floral print against a black ground is worn
with flowers in the hair and a green dotted veil. Right: A
charming dancing dress of white net with sash of chartreuse and
royal blue chiffon. The jacket is shirred in checks on lastex
threads to insure perfect fitting. The two frocks represent two
different evening silhouettes. •—From a Washington Shop.
— - - - — ■ ... i ■. ' ' ■ •*
Child Needs
Show-Off
Tricks
Ability to Perform
In Public Gives
Confidence.
By ANGELO PATRI.
■•’yyHAT'S the matter, Rosie? Why
don't you go out to play this
nice afternoon?”
"I don’t want to.”
"I know. But why don’t you want
to? What’s keeping you in?”
“I don’t feel like playing with
them. I never get a chance anyway.
And I don't want to go to their old
party, either.”
"Party? Have you been invited to a
party?”
"Uh-huh. But I’m not going.
Everybody has to do a show-off and I
can’t do any. So I won’t go.”
"A show-off?"
"Oh, Helen does a tap dance, and
Bruce speaks a piece, and Rudie makes
believe he is Charlie Chaplin, and
Bessie beats a drum like the girl in the
movies, and Minnie and Call put on
an act. The best show-off gets the
prise. So I won’t go.”
"Listan, Rosie. Let's surprise them.
You put on an act all by yourself.
Yes, you can. I’ll show you how and
we’ll practice every day until you do
it perfectly. And won’t they be sur
prised when you show them?”
“I can’t do it. What do you want
me to do?”
“You can show off Mitsie.”
“Mitsie? Mitsie? At a party?”
“Just the thing. There isn’t a dog
in town that can do what your Mitsie
does. You dress up like the ringmas
ter and put her through her tricks—
just four—no more, and you’ll take
the show. That's the girl. Come on
now and do your stuff.”
“Slowly, dolefully, Rosie dragged
herself out of the corner of the big
couch, picked up little Mitsie and
stood looking at her mother the pic
ture of dejection. But the seed had
been sown, and next day Rosie said. “If
you’ll help me, mother. I'll try. I’ll
do it. The airs those kids put on make
me sick. I’ll let Mitsie show ’em.”
So Mitsie went to the party. Her
little mistress, in gay riding dress, put
her through her tricks. “Bow to the
ladies and gentlemen, Mitsie,” she
said, and Mitsie bowed. She scratched
her right ear, she licked her chops,
she shook hands with her right paw
and her left paw, and the delighted
children shouted their pleasure. Then
she sneezed, sang a song, said good-by,
made a bow, and took the prize.
Backward children who have no
show-off gifts feel themselves inade
quate when show-offs are in order.
They hide away, retreat and lose faith
in themselves. When this feeling
shows itself, search for some little
thing that this child can do very
well, practice it so that it becomes al
most habitual, and when the chance
comes help him to show. ‘
This may seem trivial to grown-up
people, but it is not at all trifling to
children. Each wants his turn before
the audience, and, if it is possible,
he ought to have it Not to train
children to perfect stunts for public
exhibitions as an end in itself, but to
offer even the most backward his
chance to shine. His mental health de
mands it
(Copnlfht. 1938.)
Delicious Dish.
Carefully separate the whites and
yolks of four eggs and be sure to keep
the yolks whole. Beat the whites,
adding a little* salt, then fill buttered
bkking dishes or custard cups two
thirds full of the beaten whites. Care
fully drop a yolk on top of each cup
ful, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dot
with butter and then bake until the
yolks are set (about seven minutes).
Sprinkle with grated eheeee, chili
sauce or catsup and serve in baking
dish.
Smart Runabout Frock
Notice How Skirt Widens Into
| Flare From Slim Waistline.
*- -
By BARABARA BELL.
HERE is a practical day-in-day
out frock with so much style
and wearability that it is sure
to be one of your favorites.
Notice how it tapers into a slim waist,
rom which the skirt, snug at the hips,
vldens into a flare at the hem. It's
k very good line.
The tailored collar softens the
leckline and that point-edged closing
s a smart as well as individual de
ail. The buttons should match the
telt.
This design is no trouble to make,
or a complete and detailed sew chart
ictompanles your pattern, so that
tvery step is quick and easy. This is
men a useful, adaptable dress that
rou il enjoy having it in more than
ine fabric. Thus why not make it
or Immediate wear in light wool or
BARBARA «er.T.,
The Washington Star.
Inclose 35 cents in coins for
Pattern No. 5449-B. Size_
Name____
Address ___T._,_
(Wrap coins securely in paper.)
M _I
chains, and later, as the weather
warms, In linen or pique.
Barbara Bell Pattern No. 1449-B is
designed for sises 12,14,16,18, 20 and
40. Corresponding bust measurements,
30. 32, 34, 36, 38 and 40. Siae 14 re- ,
quires 3% yards of 39-inch material
with short sleeves.
Economical Time-Saver.
Hard-cook six eggs. Remove and
mash the yolks. Then add one-third
of a cup of chopped, cooked ham, a
little minced parsley, onion and cel
ery. Stuff the mixture into the whites
and arrange them in a shallow, but
tered dish. Cover with leftover gravy
or tomato sauce. Bake 15 minutes in
a moderate oven.
FINNS FULLER IINN
UN Mr 99*
Umlttd 77«i#"Oa7y"J^l*' !.i
G«t Om Tt-Nay
Call DI. 3498 ar Writ* ~
977 Nat’l. Praia BI4l.
erchanrs
TRANSFER L
STORAGE CO.
mitMN
*
Treatment
To Clear
The Skin
Plenty of Exercise
And Sleep Very
Necessary.
By ELSIE PIERCE.
J KNOW, I know that this is pre
cisely the time when you are doubt
less suffering from midseason dol
drums snd your skin looks dull am
sallow. And it isn’t really to mak
life harder, but rather to make yo*
snap out of the sluggishness that yo*
are called upon to turn a new face oi
spring.
The best way to do it is to clear you:
digestive tract, then get out in tb
open, exercise, keep your circulatioi
stepped up. Remember that it ha
been allowed to lag during the winte:
months. Remember you've been eat
ing more of heavy, oily foods and doini
less exercise. It all has a telling effec
on your skin.
If you are in really good health am
don't have very strenuous work to d<
you might try a three-day liquid diet
taking a mild cathartic first.
There’s gno skin-clearing, master
piece more magical than rest. Plai
a good night’s sleep for several con
secutive nights, retiring an hour o
more earlier than usual.
Now for the local treatment. Pu
on a mask, and as you take it off, you’l
find that you’ve sloughed the deai
skin off with it, that your skin look
clearer, fresher, shades lighter,
j. There are any number of mas!
Treatments that may be purchase*
ready-made. They are lovely and lux
urious and there’s no fuss or bothe:
in preparing them. But. if you canno
afford them, your kitchen shelf doubt
less will yield the necessary ingredi
ents for a fine mask. Refined corn oi
almond meal, white of egg, oatmeal
buttermilk, olive oil, yeast, fruit am
vegetable juices. The skin should b*
cleansed thoroughly first, then th*
mask put on and if you can arrange it
lie down* and rest for a half hour or sc
while the mask “sets.” You’ll h
rightly rewarded with a refreshed look
ing skin.
(Copyright. 1938.)
ADVERTISEMENT.
GRAY HAIR
Bnnh It Away...taskUYearsYeungw
At hcoM, without risk, you can quickly tint then
(tranks or patchea of gray to ltntroue shades of
blonde, brown or black. BROWNATONE and
n email broth don ft Easy to prove by tinting
• lock of your hair. Cannot affect waving of hair.
Guaranteed harmlemArtire coloring agent pure
ly vegetable BROWNATONE mu>t givs yon
gray.etraaked erfaded hair alluring, rich, youtl*
liri eolcr.cc money back-Only fiOe at all druggists
ADVERTISEMENT.
A Clean Skin lor Yon
by Using
Mercolized Wax Cream
How easy skin care is when Mer
coliaed Wax Cream is the beautlflei
you use. This lovely face cream com
bines cleansing with smoothing, sof
tening, beautifying and clearing.
Mercollaed Wax Cream cleans away
the discolored outer skin, dislodging
all blemishes of external origin. A
younger, clearer underskin is revealed.
Start tonight to bring out this hidden
beauty in your akin with Mercollaed
Wax Cream.
Saxelite Astringent Refreshes Skin.
Use this tingling, antiseptic astrin
gent daily to give your skin a fresh,
clean, lively appearance. Dissolve
SaBite in one-half pint witch hast]
a&Bpply to your face and neck.
low! at an oomaMa oountsca.
V*
t
Eggs Rich in Phosphorus
And Iron as Well as
Many Vitamins
A High Temperature Will
Make Them Tough Due
To Protein Shrinking.
By FRANCESCA McKENNET.
EOGS are always popular, especially during Lent, in those households
where two fast days a week are observed. Men probably eat more
eggs than women, for most men have an egg for breakfast, whether
they like it or not.
If the housewife would use a little imagination and combine eggs with
something else, the members of her household would eat what is rated by
nutrition experts as one or the 'pro-'
tective foods” with much gusto.
On Friday morning try serving the
family nice fluffy scran bled eggs with
crisp fried tomatoes, or instead of
tomatoes place a few anchovy strips
across the top. Shirred eggs with
chicken livers is something a little
bit different and should be appreciated
after the usual combination of eggs
with bacon, sausage or ham.
Every one should eat two or three
eggs a week in addition to those
used in the family cooking due to
the food value.
Research has shown that the fragile
shell of an egg covers a combination
of many of the nutrients necessary to
safeguard our health.
The Bureau of Home Economics
of the United States Department of
Agriculture tells us that each year
| the egg production starts into an
1 upswing Just before spring is really
with us. During the four months
after that the hens rustle about in
the open and lay as many eggs as
they do in all the other months of
the year put together. This year
i eggs have been considerably above
I average, both in amount and size and
! have been unusually low in price.
“Specifically, the food value of an
' egg lies in its protein, its minerals
and its vitamins. Eggs are very rich
in iron, a mineral we often lack in
our diets. Egg protein is of high
quality—the efficient kind necessary
in the structure of body tissues.
"Eggs are also an excellent source
of vitamin A and they contain vita
mins B, G and D. The vitamin D
content varies considerably, from high
to low, depending upon the food the
hen eats. Eggs are a good source of
calcium and are very rich in phos
phorus.
“For cooking, the protein Is the
r—
r
most valuable of all these nutrients.
Because of certain properties of the
proteins in eggs, a cook may use them
for thickening, for leavening or for
clarifying soups. She may use them
to bind the materials together in cro
quettes or to form a permanent emul
sion such as mayonnaise.
“In cooking eggs and egg dishes
temperature is most important. When
the protein in egg is heated it coagu
lates or becomes firm. If this heating
takes place slowly, evenly, at a mod
erate temperature, the eggs will be
tender when they are done. But with
high temperatures the protein in them
shrinks and makes the eggs tough.
"Good cooks have various ways of
controlling the temperature. If they
are making an omelet, for Instance,
they may use a smooth, heavy pan
over low heat.
"A double boiler is necessary for
other mixtures cooked on top the
stove. If the mixture in ths boiler
is a soft custard the water in the
lower part must be below rathar than
at the boiling point.
“To keep a baked custard or a
souffle at this constant temperature
put it on a rack in a pan of hot water.
“Eggs cooked in the shell may be
started in cold water and then brought
to a temperature Just below the boil
ing point. It takes about 30 minutes
to hard-cook eggs at this temperature.
But when the eggs are done their tex
ture is uniform and the egg white
next to the shell does not toughen.
“If hard-cooked eggs are cooled
immediately in water they may be re
moved from the shell more easily.
And this also helps to prevent the
formation of a dark, green substance
where the yolk and white of the egg
come together.
— * - ' 1 c—u—i
Dorothy Dix Says—
It Is Pathetic to See Parents Who
Are Bossed by Their Children.
THE rooster-pecked wife and the
henpecked husband are, indeed,
worthy of our compassion, but
they make no such pull upon
sympathies as do the chicken-pecked
parents who are one of the saddest by
products of our modern civilization.
Yet this is a common spectacle, and
the only thing that keeps us from
■ bursting into tears when we behold it
I is because we have become so used to
> it that we have been hardened to it.
1 It is the children who get all the
1 fine clothes while their parents go
i shabby. It is the children who decide
where and how the family shall live.
, Nothing is more common than to
hear a man say: “It is awfully ln
! convenient for me to live so far away
i from my business, but the children
s like it in the country.” And we have
. all been to houses where the food
virtually consisted of orange juice,
oatmeal and spinach because they
: wouldn’t have anything on the table
: to eat that wasn’t good for the Ju
venile tummy and that the children
( couldn’t eat.
> Of course, having been taught from
> their Infancy that they were superior
to their parents; that their fathers
• and mothers were provided by nature
t to wait on them and give them fine
■ clothes and cars and things, you
‘ can’t wonder that the youngsters look
down upon their underlings and feel
; it only a kindness to rule the poor
I simps for their own good.
■ 11"
A8 SOON u he get* home from
college, John begin* to tell
father how inefficiently he manages
his business: to point out his mis
takes to him: to criticise his staff
and to puncture father’s little pink
balloon of pride in his success. Mary
moves mother out of the comfortable
old home she has lived in for 20 years
into a little two-by-four apartment
in a smart neighborhood, and makes
her give up her old friends for people
who don’t want to know her. She
drags mother to the beauty shop and
has her done up until she is ashamed
to look herself in the face. 8he
corrects her grammar and pronuncia
tion, the way she sits and stands and
eats until she makes life a burden to
her.
Ninety per cent of the parents you
know are scared to death of their
children. If you don’t believe this,
watch ’em. When John and Mary
are wound they are nervous, ill at
ease, self-conscious. It is only when
they we out from under their chil
dren’s watchful eyes that they bloom
into being themselves.
Of course, if parents will permit
themselves to be chicken-pecked,
they have only themselves to Marne,
but none the less theirs is a cruel
fate that entitles them to wear both
a fool's cap and a martyr’s crown.
DOROTHY DDL
(Copyrlsht, 1938.)
GOSH,
I7& ELSIE
AGAIN
what'/Hsatf?
SHElS INVITING ME TO
ANOTHER PttRTY MOTHER
I DON'T WANT TO GO
^I I
r SOMEONE OUGHT 70 TELL 1
7HATN/CE YOONS Q/PL /
f WHY SHE ISNTMOPE \
l POPOLAP rr MAY SPOIL J
\ HEP WHOLE LIFE.1 C
i MAKE AN
□EXCUSE-BUTBE
| POLITE, JACK
What Mother did...
Jack’s mother gave Elsie a hint about per
spiration odor from undies—how it spoils
charm—how easy it is to avoid with Lux.
Elsie took the hint—started Luxing her un
dies after each wearing. She’s popular, now!
Lux takes away odor, keeps colors new
looking. Zt has no harmful alkali—safe in
water, safe in Lux.
Lux undies dolly...
i

xml | txt