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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 21, 1938, Image 14

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Learn Technique of Applying Creams and Cosmetics for Best Results
^ """"***' 9 —————i — i I ————— -- A. - -
Liquid Coloring Matter
Newest Lip Beautifier
To Be Introduced
New and Attractive Beauty
Set a Welcome Addition
To Guest Room Bath.
By MARGARET WARNER.
ITS one thing to buy new rouges, powders, lipsticks and special creams, but
do you know how to use them properly after you have them? That is
often the great stumbling block to completely satisfactory results with
cosmetics. The trouble is not with the contents of the jars, but what
you do with them.
All instructions must be read and followed carefully, and that is not
■iways as easy as it sounds, especially1
when they print them in such tiny
type on the bottom of the jars and you
are in a hurry. It takes a little study,
like everything else that is really worth
while. Even a salon facial does not
let you in on all the secrets, as your
eyes are closed most of the time during
such a treatment.
When we heard that some one was
actually teaching women how to give
themselves facials, with each step
carefully explained, it sounded like a
grand idea and so we tried it. The
experience proved so successful that
we should like to pass the word along.
You ran take a friend or two and
all have a lesson at the same time.
Everybody puts a generous dab of
cleansing cream on cotton saturated
with skin lotion and starts to cleanse
the face, working from the base of the
neck up—but the trick is to actually
experience the whole- process yourself,
learning just where to pat for stimula
tion on the neck, throat and up the
cheeks and how to produce a freshly
groomed, yet natural, appearance. It
even gives you a lift, making you feel
wonderfully refreshed, knowing that
you look so much better after your
•'do-it-yourself" facial than you did
before.
* * * *
rJ,HAT beauty and health go hand in
hand and that beauty is more '
than skin deep we have all heard many
times before. This very week an out
standing diet adviser is lecturing here
in town on health and beauty through
proper food selection, and he does not
hesitate to recognize the importance
of aiding nature to create and main
tain a beautiful skin by supplement
ing proper die* with skin treatments.
Further evidence is offered in news
received this morning from the new
school for fashion models in New
York, that their second class has been
presented to the press for inspection
after six weeks of intensive condi
tioning and training. Wonders have
been accomplished with these girls
through diet, exercise and special skin
treatments, and three case histories
were noted in detail.
Stimulating the underlying skin
tissues is a very important step in
beauty building. The action is to
tone and purify the skin by sending
the blood to the surface until you
feel It tingle. A special preparation
My Neighbor Soys:
flowering hedges like those
made by using spireas, deutzias
and lilacs should be cut back at
once when the flowering season
has passed. Rather severe cutting
is necessary if such hedges are to
be kept in good condition. Next
year's flowers are made from buds,
which will be started this season,
and unless the trimming is done
early these buds will be cut off.
If you have a gas or electric
refrigerator, try using fruit juices
for ice cubes instead of water.
They are very pretty in fruit
beverages. Lemon cubes are love
ly in iced tea.
When sugar gets hard and
lumpy, put it in the refrigerator
for two or three days and you will
find it will become quite soft
again.
Sliced bananas blend well with
cooked cherries when used for
filling baked tarts. They are good
served plain or more festive when
spread with whipped cream.
(Copyright, 10.38.)
that is used for this purpose requires
no massage. It is smoothed on the
face and neck rather thickly, allow
ing it to remain from 10 to 20 min
utes, then removing with tissues and
lotion. It is not a mask because it
does not form a stiff coating, and is
essentially different from a cleansing
or tissue cream. It has been per
fected by a Viennese woman chemist
and delver into beauty problems. This
product gives the skin a fresh and
glowing appearance, and continued
use is said to keep it in the pink of
perfection.
* * * *
wonders never cease! This
time it is something new for
the lips, to make them look as red as
spring cherries, but it is not another
lipstick. It is liquid color that it
painted on with a little gadget fast
ened to, the bottle top. This color
stays "put” for hours. eliminat!"j all
embarrassment of red smudge on
dainty hankies and table linen, not
to mention friend escort's cheek!
This non-smearing, non-greasy lip
color is a brand-new idea. It comes
in a very light English tint and a
number of other medium and darker
shades, each accompanied by a small
vial of remover in case you spoil the
outline in applying it. It has a slight ‘
sting when you first put it on, which j
is said to do no harm as it is caused
by a vegetable ingredient.
* * * *
JF YOU’VE developed a squint strain
ing your eyes at reading, writing or
knitting, or if you have some private
worry of your own that is putting a
furrow in your brow, try erasing those
lines with a new device that is really
the simplest thing in the world. It is a
box of little pink medicated tabs in the
shape of wings, that are moistened and
placed over the frown lines, pressed
firmly into position with the palm of
the hand and allowed to stay on as
long as convenient.
For best results massage the lines
with a good lubricating cream followed
by a few applications of alternating
hot and cold water, to create a stimu
lation at that point, then put on your
winglike tabs. They are fine for the
student pouring over books into the
wee hours of the night, and may be
worn to bed if desired. They come
30 in a little box for 35 cents.
One of the nioest bath boxes we’ve
seen lately is of pale blue polka-dotted
splash-proof wall paper and contains
crown-topped bottles of shower oil,
talcum powder, eau de cologne, a small
flacon of perfume and an attractive
cake of blue soap. This set makes a
most acceptable bridge prize or birth
day remembrance, as its contents are
of the best. It would also be a wel
come addition in the guest room bath.
For information concerning items
mentioned in this colnmn call Na
tional 5000, extension 395, between
10 and 12 a.m.
A Novel Idea.
Make your own kitchen containers
out of coffee, baking powder or cracker
cans. Remove all paper coverings,
then paint or shellac the cans and
put labels on them.
New Foods to Child.
In serving new foods to a young
child begin with a small portion of
each food and arrange it as at
tractively as possible. Then gradually
work up to larger portions.
/^JHILDREN never grow tired of stuffed animals that they can cuddle, but
mothers often wish that new ones could be substituted occasionally, for
purposes of cleanliness, at least. So what would be more appropriate than
Easter bunny and his family for your youngsters to enjoy for months to come?
We've designed a set that can be made almost entirely on the sewing machine.
Buying new material, we spent 45 cents for the set; if you have scraps of
material, you could cut the cost to practically nothing!
The pattern envelope contains cut-out pattern for large and small rabbit;
also complete, easy-to-upderstand, illustrated directions; also what material
and how much you will need.
To obtain this pattern, send for No. 437 and inclose 15 cent* in' Stamps
•r coin to cover service and postage. Address orders to the Needlework Editor
at The Evening Star.
(Osoesieb*. liU.) ^
* *
Gilding the Lily for Spring!
Put little wings over your lines and furrows to iron them out. Cleanse, stimulate and lubricate the
face and throaty for spring beauty^ and don't forget the lips,_pi,... ^ t,
Hollywood
Hints for
Summer
Simplicity of All
White Stresses
Extreme Youth.
3y ELSIE PIERCE.
'J'HAT almond oil may not be a new
beauty trick, but it is one of the
best and safest. A new star on Holly
wood's horizon prefers it pure and
aged for two years in a wooden barrel
or keg.
And this part of the routine is new
and news. She keeps it in an atomizer
in the icebox, believe it or not, and
sprays her throat, arms and face with
it after each cleansing. Used ice cold
the oil serves as a stimulating and
invigorating treatment, and after the
spraying a gentle patting over the skin
with the oil gives the complexion a
velvety finish.
Well, here's a new way to use your
atomizer.
White chiffon for brunettes is rec
ommended for those who wish to stress
extreme youth. Of course, simplicity
is part of the bargain, for nothing is
more effective than simplicity in the
association with youth.
But black, glittering black, in an
evening dress, with accents of fur and
jewels, w'ill add some 15 years to your
appearance—and if you can stand it,
that’s fine. In addition to adding
years, it will add a very W'orldly look—
glamour with sophistication.
One Hollywood designer who dislikes
veils predicts, however, that the dra
matic value of the mantilla will insure
it positive popularity in high style
circles., Look for it with seductive
evening gowns and smart, upswept
hair-do's.
Pink has invaded Hollywood, too.
Pink tulle, frothy with ruffles, plays
an important part in one picture.
And an indestructible quality ip a
new irridesceiit, starched organdie
eliminates the problem of wrinkles and
predicts success for this material this
coming summer.
If you would like some new color
notes for yourself, send self-addressed,
stamped (3-cent) envelope—and de
scribe the color of your skin, eyes and
hair.
(Copyright, 1938.)
—-•
Adjust Pilot Lights.
Be sure that the pilot light and
burners on your stove are adjusted
properly. Doing so will save a great
deal of fuel.
Manners
of the
Moment
TDROBABLY there's nothing a for
eign visitor dislikes more than
meeting an American who has been
around the world and visited his na
tive shores for a day or two.
If he meets this tourist once he
may not rebel But if he meets her at
every party he attends by the end of
his visit he won’t be speaking to her.
It’s not fair to either of them.
After all, you wouldn’t try to serve
him American-made curry, would
you? Well, then . . . why American
tourists?
You should offer him corn on the
cob, pancakes and a visit to the coun
try club dance on Saturday night. He
wants to go native, Just as you would
want to go native if you were visiting
India.
This is just something to remember
in ease you are put on the entertain
ment committee when a Hindu lec
turer or a Peruvian anthropologist
mm to town. JEAN. 1
. t
The Shirtwaist Model I
A New Version of This Popular :
And Indispensable Frock.
By BARBARA BELL.
'J'HIS is a particularly good ex
ample of the tailored shirtwaist
frock that so many women have
found indispensable for home, office
and general sports wear. Buttons all
down the front, and convenient little
pockets give femininity to its strictly
tailored lines.
Gathers just below the shoulder yoke
create a becoming fullness over the
bust. This design is almost as easy
to make as it is to wear, thanks to
the complete and detailed sew chart
that accompanies your pattern, so that
even beginners will have no difficulty
following every step.
For immediate wear, this model will
be pretty made up in flat crepe or a
gay print. Polka dots would be smart.
Later, make it up in linen or gingham.
The Spring and Summer Barbara
Bell Fashion Pattern Book offers other
practical shirtwaist models.
Barbara Bell pattern No. 1492-B is
designed for sizes 14, 16, 18, 20. 40 and
42. Corresponding bust measurements,
32, 34, 36, 38, 40 and 42. With long
sleeves size 16 (34) requires 5V4 yards
of 35-lnch material; with short, 4Vi
yards.
Send 15 cents for the Barbara Bell
Spring and Summer Fashion Pattern
Book. Make yourself attractive, prac
tical and becoming clothes, selecting
designs from the Barbara Bell well
planned, easy-to-make patterns.
(Copnight, 1»M8.)
—-1—•
New Hat Styles.
Sailors are back. Some are trim
med with a circlet of wings and a
silly colored veil: others smartened
with a bright nodding flower. Most of
their crowns an low, but a few are
high. Trleoros an also shown.
f
BARBARA BELL,
The Washington Star.
i
Inclose 25 cents In coins for
»
Pattern No. 1492-B. Sise __
1
Name ___....._...
Address _
Wrap coins securely in paper.
Massed Color Effects.
For those who like massed color
effect all summer, there is nothing
more beautiful than dwarf ageratum
and the miniature marigold, Tagetes
Signata Pumila. Plant the marigold
in the front of the bolder, with the
ageratum just behind. The two of
them will give you a blue-and-gold ef
fect all summer through to frost, and
they are vert easy to raise from seed.
The marigold grows about 6 inches
high and each little round bush is a
mass of miniature golden blossoms.
In buying the ageratum seed the varie
ties “little blue cap" and “blue per
fection” are the best for sice, as those
two varieties never grow higher 'than
8 to 12 inches and the color is a gor
geous "a »ender blue. To get a good
start «n summer, the seeds should be
started now in boxes in a sunny win
dow and the little plants set out after
the danger of frost is past. If that is
not possible, then starting them right
where they are to stay to perfectly
agreeable with them.
. ^
Correcting
Group of
Children
Scold the Bad Ones
But Don’t Drag in
The Innocent.
By ANGELO PATRI.
JJID you ever stop to think how
much trouble we parents and
teachers make for ourselves by scold
ing perfectly good children for the
wrong-doing of others?
On the way home from school in
the afternoon two boys begin throw
ing stones. A stone goes through the
window of a nearby house. The angry
owner telephones the school principal
and asks him, if he cannot manage to
teach the children that go to his school
to respect property. Or Is he lust
training a group of young hoodlums
for the destruction of the town gen
erally?
Next morning in assembly, after
the singing of the hymn, the princi
pal rises solemnly and announces.
"Yesterday afternoon two boys of this
school disgraced its good name-”
and for 15 minutes lectures the whole
assembly on the wickedness of de
struction of property. The 572 law
abiding young citizens have to sit
there and listen, knowing that this
lecture is going to cost them the
musical program, or the play, that
was scheduled. They resent the whole
thing bitterly. They are bored stiff
and stupid, and it takes the teachtrs
an hour to get them into a frame cf
mind where work is possible.
At home the same thing happens.
One of the children does something
annoying or mischievous. Father or
mother, maybe both, talk about the
evil deed throughout the meal ana
keep grumbling about it for the rest
of the evening. The fact that the
other children had nothing to do with
it does not seem to mean anything to
them. The children are miserable and
resentful. Why talk to them when it
was Henry who did it?
General scoldings are an imposition
on all who have to endure them. It
is right that the wicked be brought to
Justice, but why drag along the in
nocent as well? Why deprive them of
the joy of an hour in assembly or
class or at the table? It does them no
good, and the guilty ones use their
companions as moral umbrellas. Their
individual guilt has been diluted by
the deluge that drowned the whole
group. They can take lightly what all
must share.
Keep bad deeds private. Call the
culprits into conference; say all you
have to say in their ears. Punish
them if need be. To emphasize the
right side of the wrong idea speak in
praise of the good deeds done by the
other. They have broken no windows,
stolen no apples, stoned no cats. Tell
them that you are very pleased by
their good behavior. You have heard
that there are some who do wrong,
but you are delighted to know that
they are doing well. Praise good deeds
publicly, but keep the screen of pri
vacy between the wrong-doers and the
public.
The great body of children and
youth are well behaved. The number
who misbehave are few in comparison.
Public opinion among the school chil
dren invariably supports the right.
If, however, the wrong action is spread
over the whole group. If their ears
are stunned by loud scoldings for
which there is no excuse, public opin
ion Is, to say the least, not strongly
on the side of the authority who has
let his wrath run away with his
reason.
Mr. Patrl has prepared a leaflet
entitled "Changing Habits,” in which
he tells parents how to overcome a
child's unpleasant habits. Send for it.
addressing your request to Angelo
Patrl, Child Psychology Department
of this paper. Inclose a self-addressed,
•tamped (l-oent) envelope.
<
* i"— ..■.. - ■ ■' ■ ■ ' ,
Dorothy Dix Says—
What a Man Thinks of a Woman Is
What She Wants Him to Think.
WHAT do men really think
aboqt women? What spe
cific qualities do men find
attractive In women? How
do men want women to treat them?
What is the best, method of catching
and holding one of these illusive ani
mals?
These are the things that women
■want to know more than anything
else In the world, but heretofore they
have had no way of finding out. The
real attitude of men toward women
has been a deep dark secret that they
have hidden in the innermost recesses
of their souls, and so women have been
reduced to making guesses at what
men like about them that were mostly
the wrong answers and playing
hunches that failed to win out.
Now, however, the mystery has been
solved. At long last a man has broken
all the taboos of his tribe and written
a book which he calls “The Way to
His Heart,” in which he tells just what
things about women make a hit with
men and what leaves them cold. The
book reveals how to go about wangling
dates from boys and how to camou
flage the path to the altar so artfully
that the bridegroom won’t know he is
on his way until he is there.
It Is an entertaining and amusing
little volume that will doubtless be
come a sort of debutantes’ Bible, for
it tells them the things about men
that it takes most women until they
are 35 to find out, when the informa
tion comes too late to do them any
good. Such as, for Instance, that even
the most timid and mousy of men,
who are so afraid of women they are
ready to run if one shakes a skirt at
them, want to be thought gay Lo
tharios and perfect devils among the
fair sex that none can resist, and that
nothing attracts a man to a woman
so much as for her to be easily amused
and enjoy things.
a a a a
A“?-. he warns women against the
suicidal folly of ever letting men
find out that they know more than
men do. or play a better game of
bridge or golf, or draw down a better
salary in business. Even in conversa
i tion they must "assist" instead of
j leading it, and make the man feel that
; he thought of the thought first and
that they are merely following along
I in his wake, picking up the pearls of
wisdom that he scattered.
Likewise, he advises women to watch
their steps and study a man’s moods
in dealing with him, so that they may
know how to always strike the right
note with him and not snuggle up to
him for a little petting when he has
had a bad dinner, or been to a dull
party, or lost too much money at cards,
and all that he wants to do is to knock
somebody's block off Instead of kiss.
Now these revelations of the work
ings of a man's mind and affections
as they appertain to femmes are high
ly interesting. But the trouble with
them is that a woman would have to
be a mind reader, a prophetess and a
self-abnegating saint to put them into
practice. Few girls, alas, possess these
gifts or have any occult power by
which they can tell whether when a
man invites them to an expensive
night club they should go along and
drink champagne or say. "Oh. no; I
let's go to the movies instead and have !
a soft drink afterward at the drug
store.” They don't even know whether
the yearning look they see in a man's
eyes means love or that he has missed ;
his lunch. So how?
* * * *
, ''J'HIS isn’t dumbness on women’s 1
part. It is just that nobody knows
what a man thinks about women, or
what he wants in women, or what he
admires in women, because he doesn’t
know himself. Probably there never
was a man who hadn’t his ideal wom
an figured out to the last hair on her
head. She was always going to be
beautiful and Intelligent and domestic
and thrifty and meek and mild, and
have a little money and look up to
him as a little tin god.
And then some day he met a wild
l-— . _
Cook’s Corner
By MRS. ALEXANDER GEORGE.
BREAKFAST MENU
Grapefruit Juice
French Toast Surprise
Broiled Bacon
Coffee
LUNCHEON MENU
Egg and Vegetable Salad
Butter Toast Tea
Chocolate Drop Cookies
Peach Sauce
DINNER MENU
Broiled Platter De Luxe
Bread Apple Butter
Head Lettuce Relish Dressing
Cherry Tarts
. Coffee
FRENCH TOAST SURPRISE.
6 slices toast teaspoon
2 egg yolks paripka
Va cup milk 4 tablespoons fat
1 teaspoon y3 cup pineapple
granulated sugar conserve
J/i teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons
butter
Beat yelks in a shallow dish. Add
milk, sugar, salt and paprika. Dip
toast into this mixture and then
quickly place in the fat which has been
heated in a frying pan. Cook until
toast is well browned on both sides.
Mix conserve with butter. Spread on
three of the slices of hot toast. Cover
with remaining slices and cut into
halves.
FILLING FOR TARTS.
2 cups seeded red % cup granu
cherries lated sugar
2 tablespoons % cup clierry
flour juice
1% tablespoon 2 tablespoons
‘lemon juice butter
Mix cherries with flour, lemon juice
and sugar. Add rest of Ingredients.
Cook slowly until thick. Cool and
pour Into baked tart cases.
hoyden who was everything on earth
that his dream girl wasn’t, and she set
his pulses fluttering. She became the
one and only woman in the world he
desired, and he married her.
Hence it doesn’t much matter about
what men thin* they think about
women, because in the end the women
attend to that matter themselves.
They form men's tastes and opinion*
in women and make them like it.
Every girl who falls in love with a
man sells him the Idea that he not
only discovered her, but that she Is
the one for whom he has been search
ing for years and years; that he pre
fers blonds to brunettes or vice versa,
according to whether she is fair or
dark; he likes them gay and snappv
or prim and demure, a* she Is one
or the other.
So, after all, what, a man thinks of
a woman is what she wants him to
think. She puts the good thought on
him.
**• * w m
J)EAR DOROTHY DIX — My hus
band, after twenty-five years of
marriage, has derided that he wants
a divorce, as he has at last met the
one and only woman for whom he
has been looking, more or less, ever
since we were married. This is the
second time he has discovered her. He
wants me to get the divorce, as he
says it would save my face. He sits
home and pouts. Won’t talk. Won't
eat. Doesn't care what happens.
Threatens suicide. Acts worse than
any spoiled child. The gloom is so
thick you would think we were in a
morgue. My life' Is made miserable
and I only hesitate about the divorce
because we have an 11-year-old child.
1 want to hold the home together for
her. because I kncrtv my husband will
soon tire of this new charmer as he
has of all the others. I have tried
everything I know of to cheer him up.
but just when he is getting back to
normal he receives a leter from his
Lady Lave asking what of mv plan?
and we start ail over. Shalfl write
her that I intend to stay married, or
pack my trunk, as I have been re
quested, and leave? UNDECIDED.
Answer: If you have any affection
left for your philandering husband and
think he is worth keeping in spite of ■
his defects, I strongly advise you to
stay put and to write the woman that,
you haven’t the slightest intention of
ever getting a divorce and that your
husband can’t get one from you, so she
had just as well turn her affections
toward some more promising prospect.
Evidently your husband Is Just one
of the spoiled-child type of men. After
he gets through pouting and sulking
he will cheer up and thank you for
saving him from all the mess of a
divorce and the expense of having 11
support two families.
But make your plans to stay man
very clear to the Other Woman.
DOROTHY DIX
(Coprrleht, 193*.)
Answering
Wedding
Queries
See Clergyman tc
Arrange Church
Ceremony.
By EMILY’ POST.
J}EAR MRS. POST: Neither rr
flanre nor I have a church of on:
ow-n, and yet we would like to ha- ’
our wedding in church and no* at
some magistrate’s office. When a
bride-to-be finds herself In this sit
uation, what 1s there left for her to
do?
Answer—It is not necessary to have
joined a Protestant church In order
to ask a minister to marry you. You
of course go to see the clergyman of
whichever church you like best: that
Is, the church to which you perhaps
occasionally go and might some day
want to join.
ik * * *
£)EAR MRS. POST: When the bride
and bridegroom wait at the back of
church after the ceremony to receive
the good wishes of the congregation
as they pass out of the church are
they supposed to receive alone, or may
the attendants stand with them, and
the mothers? In our case we are hav
ing only the immediate families at a
reception so that guests will have
no chance of meeting the bridegroom's
mother and his sister, who is the at
tendant, both of whom are strangers
In town.
Answer—The same people who
would receive if there were to be a
reception can always stand at the
back of the church with the brlda
and bridegroom and speak to the con
gregation, but there would not be any
regular receiving line under such cir
cumstances. Maybe I can explain this
better by saying that the bride and
bridegroom would be standing nearer
to the line of the departing congre
gation. The others would stand a
little distance away, and not together
In a line, so that people could see
them and have a few words with
those whom they know especially well
but n6t file by a reception line In a
queue. In your case if your mother,
with the bridegroom's mother and sis
ter, would stand a little apart in a
group of three, this would encourage
the more Intimate friends to come up
and shake hands with her and give
her an opportunity of introducing
them to the bridegroom's mother and
sister. People who know the families
slightly simply shake hands with the
bride and bridegroom and pass on out
of the church.
Stuart’s
Face ft Hand Lotion
Highly uteful at a
powder bate.
Ret. 3-oi. Size
ONLY 29c
I ror saie ax an arug ttoret m
^I j
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f Got Oh* Today
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art Nst'L Pm* BIO.

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