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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 28, 1938, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1938-03-28/ed-1/seq-7/

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Abf Watch Cleaned and Overhauled, $9
TILE WORK
NEW OR REPAIR WORK
We use Assentation Tile
EDWIN E. ELLETT
HIM 9th 8t N.W HAt 8731
USED BY MILLIONS OF GOOD COOKsP^
The George Washington University
presents
HAROLD J. LASKI
in a series of two lectures on
"THE FUTURE OF
FEDERALISM IN THE U. S."
CONSTITUTION HALL
April 7 and April 8 at 8:15 P. M.
Balcony. 75c; Orchestra. 81. 81.50. $9,
$9.50. Individual box scats. $1 and 89.
Boxes (holding five), $5 and $10.
Prices stated are tor single lecture.
All checks payable to George Washing
ton University—Mail to Room 407 D
I Make Your Own Screens
I SCREEN RAIL
I WITH MOULDING
I 2 Vic «•
m Gatvmnlued Screen Wire, 3c ft.
S Delivered Free
H We Cut and Kin I,umber to
■ Wanted Sires Free of Charge
I J. FRANK
I^ELLY
H Lumber—Millwork
■ %2121 Georgia Ave. NO, 1341
__ Established 48 Years Ago
H Take
BB Any
SB Bus
— Leav
BB inf
BB nth
BB ’ *nd
BB Pa.
BB Ave.
I Need Cash?
B Want it in a hurry? Want it with
B °*M recl ts*Pp‘* Confidential loans on
■ Diamonds. Watches. Jewelry. Guns,
B Cameras. Musical Instruments, etc.,
■ at Lowest Rates Possible.
I HORNING'S
I Opp. Washington Airport
If Your Dentist Hurts You, Try
DR. FIELD
PLATE EXPERT
e^T^=a D#ubl*
suction
I Guarantee a Tight Fit in Any Mouth
Violet Ray Treatment for Pyorrhea
Extraction*. *1 & #•». Also Gas
Plate* «IO to S.TA
Gold frowns *»> up
Filling* $1 up
DR. FIELD
406 7fh St. N.W. MEt. 9256
Over Wool worth .*»c & I lie Store
“Orilak” WM
Furniture Enamel WM
Quirk ' be*«“,ul \
1 shades.
/ o r in.ri „ ^ y On a
v8cV • ••.;• 1
potSI
I PAINT COMPANY I
I B09 C ShwtMW I
I MFfro.DI50_rJI
£ea.uti^
STYLES
There is a style to enhance
every furnishing scheme,
from the severe line of
modern design to the sump*
tuous elegance of the
Louis XV period. See them
today or mail the coupon
for full particulars.
THE
V SPINET
nA WEEK PAYS
Plug Budtfgt Cbatgm
PRICED $245 UP
E. A. NORTH PIANO CO.
1*31 G St. N.W. . DI. 1324
ilcese scad illustrated catalog with fell
particulars.
QS3S • ■»..• ... .......................
Addmt .. *J
. NEW GOVERNMENT
SET UP AT NANKING
Liang Hung-Tze at Head of
Regime—‘Peace and
Order’ Urged.
p F.J the Assort*ted Pres*.
^ SHANGHAI, March 2*.—A new,
government with Chinese personnel
but dominated by Japan was set up
today at; Nanking—former capital of
the Chinese Nationalist regime—to
replace Generalissimo Chiang Kai
shek's administration.
The new government was described
by its sponsors as the “reformed gov
ernment of the Republic of China.”
Japan last week ordered the crea
tion of such a government at Nan
king "under the umbrella” of the
similar North China regime recently
; established at Peiping,
i Inauguration of the Nanking gov
I ernment was announced here through
a manifesto signed by Liang Hung-tae,
chairman of the Executive Yuan.
Equivalent te Premier.
Liang Hung-tae, whose post is
j equivalent to that of premier, former
i ly was secretary general under Tuan
i Chi-jui, provisional chief executive of
China in 1924 and 1925.
He issued a statement saying the
new government would respect “all
just and vested foreign rights" but,
; hereafter, would not recognize any
j contracts or treaties made by the Na
' tional (Chiang) government at Han
kow or by Chinese provincial govern
, ments with foreign powers.
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek has
been operating the Nationalist govern
ment at Hankow while carrying on
the fight against the Japanese in
vaders. He moved his government to
j Hankow before Nanking’s capture De
cember 11, 1937.
Lincheng Reported Retaken.
(Dispatches from Hanlcow said
Chinese troops had recaptured
Lincheng. strategic South Shan
tung Province city on the Tientsin
Pukow Railway.
1 Chinese military leaders said
they were convinced the Japanese
offensive down the railway against
Suchow had been stopped. Suchow,
south of Lincheng, is the junction
city where the Tientsin-Pukow line
crosses the vital east-west Lunghai
Railway.
1 The Chinese said they cut
Japanese lines of retreat in so
many places around Lincheng that
the invaders were forced to break
ranks and take to the hills, aban
doning communications established
at great cost in the past two weeks'
severe fighting.)
That the Japanese have been suffer
ing heavy losses in recent battles,
many of which have resulted in set
backs, was evidenced by the arrival in
Shanghai of 40 truck loads of dead
soldiers. Military observers estimated
there were 600 corpses in the convoy.
Chen Chin Tan, Finance Minister.
The finance minister of the new
Nanking regime is Chen Chin Tao,
■ former chairman of the national Cur
! rency Reform Commission. A grad
uate of Columbia and Yale Univer
sities. he served as vice minister of
finance in the Manchu government
just before the 1911 revolution.
Later he was minister of finance in
the first republican government. He
held this office again in 1916. until he
ran into legal difficulties over embez
zlement charges.
Tcheng Loh (Chen Lu), retired dip
lomatic official who at one time was
| the Chinese delegate to the League of
Nations, became minister of foreign
affairs.
Other ministers designated were
Wen Tsung-yao, judicial; Chen Chun
interior; Wang Tsh-hu, industry, and
Chen Tse-min, education. No minister
of war was named.
Gen. Shunroku Hata, commander of
Japanese troops In Central China, and
| ^'ce Admiral Kiyoshi Hasegawa were
I represented at the inauguration.
Japanese planes flew over Shanghai
dropping handbills announcing the in
: auguration. The five-barred flag was
hoisted on Japanese-controlled build
ings in Shanghai.
Rising waters of the Yellow River
were threatening to flood Southern
Hopeh province, where Chinese soldiers
destroyed the dikes.
Urge* Peace and Order.
| The new government at Nanking
] called upon the Chinese people to give
up what it called "unscrupulous, anti
| Japanese, pro-Communist policies” and
j restore peace and order in friendly
1 co-operation with Japan.
Liang Hung-tze pledged his govern
ment to unify with North China when
the Japanese consolidate their gains
through occupation of the Tientsin
Pukow and Lunghai Railway lines.
Chinese troops, however, have been
persistently delaying achievement of
Japan's military aims by counter
attacking all along the line in Central
China.
Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek flew
to Central China to take personal
command of the operations in that
vast battle zone.
[MISS ROSA M. PLACE
DIES AFTER ILLNESS
Owner of National Herb do. Had
Lived in Capital More
Than 35 Yeara.
Miss Rosa M. Place, owner and
manager of the National Herb Co.,
died yesterday at her home, 1857 Park
road N.W.. after an Illness of six
months. She would have been 71 on
May 20.
For over 35 years a resident of this
city, Miss Place taught a Sunday
school class at the Covenant-First
Presbyterian Church until recently.
She was a charter member of the
Soroptimist Club and was a former
chairman of its Finance Committee.
During the World War she was active
in Red Cross work here.
Surviving are two sisters. Mrs.
Lillian B. Johnson, this city, and Mrs.
Caroline L. Noble, Jamaica, N. Y.
Funeral services will be held at
2:30 p.m. Wednesdar at the residence.
Rev. Dr. A. J. McCartney, pastor
of the Covenant-First Presbyterian
Church, will officiate. Burial will be
at Corry, Pa.
PATRIOT TO BE GLORIFIED
HOLLYWOOD, March 28 (&).—
Warner Bros. Studio announced today
it would produce a motion picture to
glorify Haym Soloman, Jewish patriot,
banished from Poland in 1772 because
of his effort to free his native land
from Russia. ,
“My country first” will be the title
of the picture, depicting Sokunan’s
service in George Washington's army
as a spy and his loan of $800,000 to
keep the army going.
Son of Eire
PRESIDENT’S SON MARCHES IN
DUBLIN PARADE.
VIVIAN DE VALERA,
Son of the Irish Free State
President, Eamon De Valera,
leading his company during
the St. Patrick’s Day army
parade in Dublin March 17.
—Wide World Photo.
Mexico
_ (Continued From First Page.)
decision to discontinue Mexican sil
ver purchases was followed by a
drop on the London market to 43.79
cents an ounce. Dispatches said i
dealers were concerned that a similar
decision might be reached as to other
markets.
Members in Congress from the sil
ver-producing States followed the de
velopments closely.
Senator Thomas, Democrat, of Okla- !
homa. one of the leaders of the Sen- i
ates silver bloc, predicted the United j
Stales' action would force Mexico into
inflation.
He predicted also that the world
market would break.
Senator Adams, Democrat, of Colo- j
rado said, however, he believed the
order would have little effect, declar
ing that silver which was not pur- !
chased by the United States from
Mexico would have to be bought from
the world market anyway.
Senator Thomas, Democrat, of Utah
pointed out that the order would have
no effect on the price of domestic
mined silver It is purchased by the
Treasury at fixed rate.
The three Senators agreed that the
action would serve notice on Mexico
she must adjust her trade relations
with the United States.
Before going in to see Secretary Hull
Mr. Farish said the American oil com
panies had no plan for settlement of
the problem created by the expropria
tion of their properties.
"We are In the hands of the State
Department,” he said.
He said he did not see how their
position would be helped by the sus
pension of silver purchases from Mex
ico.
"Our properties have already been
expropriated," he said, “and the thing
is done.” '
MEXICO AWAITS REACTION. j
Keep* Ears Open for News of Hull’s
Oil Conference.
MEXICO CITY, March 28 (/Pi.—The
United States Treasury's decision to
cease buying Mexican silver aroused
speculation here today as to what fur
ther reaction there would be in Wash
ington over Mexico's expropriation of
the foreign oil industry.
Reacting to the decision, the peso
dropped 2 points on the foreign ex
change market from Saturday s clos
ing. Banks bought United States dol
lars at 4.35 pesos 123 cents to the peso)
and sold them at 4.50 122.22 cents).
All of Mexico City was awaiting the
outcome of a conference between rep
resentatives of the four American com
panies aflected by the expropriation
decree and Secretary of State Hull and i
Undersecretary Sumner Welles in
Washington.
The decision to suspend purchases
was reflected here in a seemingly less
friendly atmosphere toward foreign
ers. One American couple, long-time
residents of Mexico City, reported
shopkeepers in a big uptown market
refused to sell them goods.
Mexican government officials, in
accordance with President Lazaro
Cardenas’ admonitions to consider
the United States Treasury’s action !
“with serenity and Justice,” declined
to comment.
The newly-formed petroleum coun
cil headed by Vicente Cortes Her
rera, which will undertake to operate
the industry, completed its organiza
tion and named minor functionaries
to help “normalize” production.
At the same time, it was announced
that the government is preparing to
turn over the national railways, which
Cardenas expropriated in June, 1937,
to 48,000 workers for operation.
The 8,526-mile railway system, na
tionalised in the same fashion as is
being tried with the oil industry, but
with far less protest, has been oper
ated since the middle of December
by an autonomous railway department
headed by Antonio Madrazo.
Gloria Baker to Sail.
MANILA, March 28 (/P).—Miss
Oloria Baker, American heiress who
interrupted a world cruise here two
days ago to obtain medical attention,
says she is “feeling line—much better”
and expected to sail for Honolulu
today.
/ (2tuiie of the \
ASUNGSHOILMI
I to EUROPE and AFRICA I
I Tulip tim> in Holland, I
1 "linen Nome*! Brittany I
\FROM N. T. APRIL 26...35 DATS /
\ 9398 UP /
\ THOS.COOKtSON M
X 51* 15th St. N.W. J
Natlaaal 457*
V
FREE
DELIVERY!
Phone
Your Order
To Locate
Your Nearest
D. G. S. Store
Ju,t Call
District
I JSm These Prices Effective in Washington and Vicinity Until
Close of Business Tuesday, March 29th, 1938.
*lllll4IIHIftlli4aailllllliaillllllllfliailll>ICIIiaftilllllfllllltaM14iaillllllflaiiailtailiaaAai i>fllliaAlliaBBAaiaaiflaaaaaaa.aaa.aa a __— __
MILK-FED V EAbt
! This is the season of the year to really enjoy Veal . . . and when Veal 1
I is cut from milk-fed calves, as this Veal is, it is very much like chicken |
I or lamb in flavor and texture. |
I SHOULDER ROAST ,b1Q<
Z Pot roast it with a can of tomatoes, a chop- | ^ J
Z ped green pepper and two sliced onions. |
\ R|B IK ^ L0IN lb A3* I
I CHOPS - - - lb 3 CHOPS . . . lb I
| Bake or brown and serve with brown gravy. |
{tender CUTLETSlt47«
I X The favorite veal cut of most every man. **>• BHI M |
Thoroughly enjoyed when breaded or browned. m m |
I BREAST OF VEAL ie<
1 The most economical veal cut. ‘b. I 1
I * Have a pocket cut in for stuffing. ® §
1 STEAKS NU..LBND
1 Cut from U. S. Govt. Officially Graded MARGARINE |
STEER BEEF J yb- J Cc |
Round - - - - - 33c; frff* ■...mui
§ rntc ■ TUMBLER |
= — - -1 *_ 1L with eoch pound purchase nf £
1 diriOin. j /C MRS. FILBERTS |
I Porterhouse * 43‘
PI A | A R A A I Soups lb. I y C Margarine on tale in
| ■ IUIW Vvwl GStew, I ^ lieen.eJ .tare, only. I
I S EVER^ SUNSHADE EGG irA! »ol"l buttfr 'b- 35c 1
| LARGE, WHITE, FRESH EGG! BUTTER- J•* I
= i U. S. Govt. Graded and Dated ( D G S «fm I
( SUNSHADE CREAMERY BUTTER lb' 39c I
1 EGGS _ _ _ _ I | D. G. S. Gavt. Grade No. 1 J • I
5 U. S. Standards, Lorge—Retail Grade B SLICED BACON_,D D |
1 DEE GEE Selected , Brandywine „ mtarn I
I FRESH EGGS- JL i \ SLICED BACON_lb< 37C J
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Duff's am m Dromedary .. ■ m
Ginger Bread Mix pkg 2lc Cranberry Sauce 14c
Ritter Cooked am .. am mm Bee Brand Pure am rm
Spaghetti - - 3 ««• 25c Vanilla Extract ^ 23c
Apricots-X°: Mushrooms - - "n 21c
Red*Ripe. Fresh
TOMATOES
| _17
= Bright, Cleon Gr Smooth |" Tender ^ 1
| Fresh Beets_bunch ^ Crisp Celery_dt stalks 17C
s
£ F'rm. Cleor & Crisp IT#* Smooth Gr Sound M « |
| Fresh Carrots_bunch DC Sweet Potatoes— ** lb*‘ IDC
| CLEAN AND CRISP
I Fresh SPINACH
s
1 U. S. No. 1 Old-Fashioned
WINESAP APPLES
I Juicy Florida d P f
GRAPEFRUIT - !
s * l j
I THIN SKINNED—HEAVY WITH JUICE
s
1 Florida Valencia
j ORANGES *
1 LARGER SIZE_«■««. 23c
s

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