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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 29, 1938, Image 11

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Comedy at the National
Lyrical in Its Lunacy
‘You Can’t Take It With You’ Offers
Maddest Family Ever Brought
To Local Drama Lovers.
By JAY CARMODY.
ONCE upon a time a couple of brilliant playwrights went lyrically
lunatic long enough to write a play called "You Can’t Take It With
You.” The play, a mad farce which has been running for more
than a year in New York, showed up at the National Theater last
night and required but a few seconds to convince every one that lyrical
lunacy is perhaps the best mood playwrights ever achieve. There have been
lepuiua, autiLeu most niceiy Dy enemies
of the Pulitzer prize judges who gave
It last year's blue ribbon, that the play
was written by Moss Hart and George
S. Kaufmann as a joke. If it is true,
“You Can’t Take It With You” still is
the best Joke in years. If you like
enjoyment, you better get over to the
National and let Sam Harris’ cast tell
it to you. Even if you don’t, maybe
you had better drop around and see
what marvelous things it can do for
your liver.
To be lyrically lunatic like Messrs.
Hart and Kaufman, if you want to
be a successful playwright and do a
sequel to “You Can't Take It With
You,” just start wondering what people
would be like if they were what they
wanted to be. Out of the Hart-Kauf
man speculation on the subject came
the Sycamore family, headed by
Grandpa Vanderhof. Each member of
the family is a beautifully rugged
Individualist. The Sycamore living
room (and what a life!) is headquar
ters apparently for all the zanies in
the world. Grandpa, w|jo started for
the office one morning 35 years ago
and never reached there because it
suddenly seemed silly, is the head of
the family and a specialist in encour
aging people to happiness. He be
lieves it is achieved by every one doing
the thing he wants to do—within rea
son, of course.
J_JE LETS his daughter write one
unsuccessful play after another,
his son-in-law manufacture fireworks,
his granddaughter split her time be
tween making candy and ballet danc
ing, the former iceman, who just liked
the place so well he stayed for eight
years, become a combined fireworks
maker and artist's model, while (if
you’re still there) his grand-son-in-law
splits his time between xylophone
playing and printing on a small hand
press. All these arts and crafts are
practiced in the Sycamore living room
right before your eyes, achieving an
t effect that is explosively funny from
8.40 to 10:55 p.m. It is practically
unbelievable that so much could be
crowded into a single setting and not
be bewildering, but it is not a bit
bewildering. Just hilarious.
Nothing can withstand the dopey
Sycamores. Even the Federal Gov
ernment falls before Grandpa’s dis
approval of income taxes, a disapproval
so violent that he owes 24 years beck
taxes. The case is settled by the
Government apologising to Grandpa
for having tried to collect the money.
A grand-duchess who comes to visit
them to get a square meal finally
cooks it and the Wall Street baron
who doesn't want his son to marry a
Sycamore daughter finally capitulates,
joins the troup and takes up the
saxophone where he left off in the
days of his youth. It's that sort of
thing.
The deadly aeriousness with which
the species live takes an awful beat
ing in the words the playwrights put
into the mouths of the Sycamores. So
convincing is it in its simplicity that
the economic insanity practiced by the
family comes out at the end of the
third act looking like the wisdom
toward which man has been groping
all these years.
There’s no need to worry about the
fact that it is a road company that
is playing “You Can’t .Take It With
You” here. It is the company which
played the farce for a year in Chicago
and compares evenly with the one
which has been on Broadway even
longer. Aldrich Bowker is second to
no one in making Grandpa’s non-con
formity to sane standards of living
look like the smartest thing any
elderly gentleman ever learned as a
result of a long life. Eva Condon
is practically perfect as the nitwit
Mrs. Sycamore, Bobbe Arnst is ex
cellent as the daughter who wants to
dance (but never will, you bet), Mar
garet Callahan gives a very appealing
performance as the only sane Syca
more, the daughter who wants to
«Q*----—
•i
marry the broker’s son,' and—well, the
others are all good, too.
If you ever have wondered what life
would be like it every one stopped
being so solemn, tense and ambitious,
just call on the Sycamores at the
National some time during the next
two weeks. They’ll teach youl And
you will love them for itl
* * * a
J-JI-HO, hi-ho, off from Keith’s
"Snow White” will go. The going
will take place Thursday night, after
seven weeks, two weeks longer than
any other picture ever ran at Keith's.
Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant,
in "Bringing Up Baby” (if baby hasn’t
grown up while waiting), will be the
next attraction. That’s from fairy
tales to farce . . . Habit is horrible,
sometimes. That is what they are
trying to make you think in connection
with the picture, “The First Hundred
Years,” which stars Robert Mont
gomery and Virginia Bruce. The hor
rible habit in this case is that of Miss
Bruce, who sleeps on her right side.
They did not know that when they
arranged one set in the picture. They
had to change the whole thing because
Miss Bruce cAuldn't be natural getting
out of bed on the left, or wrong side.
Something to mull over if you are
looking for something to mull over:
We have not seen the exact figures,
but the figures of speech which Frank
La Falce and Dan Terrell use in con
nection with "Jezebel” make it clear
that the picture is breaking months
and months of attendance records not
only here but in Baltimore. Maybe
David O. Selznick, who owns the pic
ture rights to a book called "Gone
With the Wind” would like to know
. . . Speaking of months and months,
Barnee is not the only musician at
the Shoreham who can remember your
favorite number approximately for
ever. It was at luncheon the other
day that a couple of Sibelius fans
walked in after months of absence, and
heard the orchestra strike up their pre
ferred selection.
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—"You Can't Take It With
You,” Broadway's prize comedy of a
mad family circle: 8:30 p.m.
Earle—"Jezebel,” Bette Davis in a
story that is almost "Gone With the
Wind”: 10:50 am., 1:35, 4:20, 7:10
and 9:55 p.m. Stage shows: 12:40
3:30, 6.15 and 9:05 p.m.
Capitol—"Rebecca of Sunnybrook
Farm,” Shirley Temple in a new ver
sion of the story: 11:05 am., 1:45,
4:30, 7:20 and 10:05 p.m. Stage
shows: 12:40, 3:20, 6:15 and 8:55 pm.
Metropolitan—"A Slight Case of
Murder.” Gangland doings are made
very amusing: 11:35 a.m., 1:35, 3:35
5:40, 7:40 and 9:45 p.m.
Palace — "The Goldwyn - Follies,"
Charlie McCarthy and umpteen play
D.||a. AT ARMORS
IVOlier SILVER SPRING. HD.
ClrMiinn Every Erentno Except
9KQTII10 Mon.. 1 SO to 10:S0
72 years of buying, selling and
lending on diamonds, jewelry, etc.
' Liberal Leans at Loweat Possible Rate*
CASH FOR OLD GOLD
(Government License)
E. HEIDENHEIMER
Extablithad 1866
LOAN OFFICE
*05 Kin* 8t. WASH. STORE
Ale*.. Va.1815 H St, N.W.
_DANCING.
DANCE and STAY YOUNG
K**b » youthful outlook
OfJUM/ br daneiit* well. Call
w ViL-/ Ethel M. Fiktere. farmer
DANCING' Arthur Murray teacher.
Open 10 to 10—Diet. 2400
1 Studio 1223 Connecticut Avenue
Now—Two Entire Floors
Baltimore—Pittsburgh—Cincinnati
BON MARTINI
Nationally Famous Studios
Waltz, Fox Trot, Shog, Tango, Rumba
Become a smooth, inter'stina, popular
dancer in a short time. Private lessons.
CULTURED. TALENTED TEACHERS
Beginners Given Special Attention
1811 HSt.M.W. 2*52
Win redueim, body build- H «
ini exerclxe. Retinnen. ll
odvoneed. Umm ” ■
Every Men, Wed.. FrL. 7 to S F.M.
Join us, it's lots of fun.
"Don Martini Conducts This Branch"
PLEASANT AND
PROFITABLE
Dancing it a pleasure that leads to
friendships and social contacts that
may advance you in practical ends.
Learn to dance ‘with poise and grace
through the experienced and private
instruction at Leroy H. Thayer Studios.
Come in between 10 and 10 for a
Complimentary Guest Lesson and
Dance Analysis.'
Gerot{ H. thaupr
1215 Connecticut Avenue
MEtreoellUn tltf
___
NEW SPRINGS $1 CA
IN CUSHION_
Cogswell Chairs_$11.50
Fireside Chairs_$14.50
uverstujjea suites at proportionately low rates
HAVE YOUR UPHOLSTERING DONE RIGHT AND PUT
BACK ON ITS PROPER LINES AND PROPER SHAPE
BY OUR SKILLED MECHANICS, WHO HAVE BEEN
WITH US FOR YEARS. WHILE SPENDING MONEY,
GET THE BEST WORKMANSHIP YOU CAN.
CHAIR CANE1NG, PORCH ROCKERS SPLINTED
CLAY A. ARMSTRONG
1238 lOth St. H.W. e., ....
Doesn’t Seem So Difficult
Even though the first 100 years are supposed to be the
hardest, Virginia Bruce and Bob Montgomery seem to be getting
along all right in this scene from “The First Hundred Years.’’
The neio comedy comes to Loew’s Capitol Theater Friday.
ers in one of the most pretentious
musicals: 11:10 a.m., 1:45, 4:20, 7 and
9:35 p.m.
Columbia—“Happy Landing,” Sonja
continues to skate: 11:50 a.m., 2:20,
4:45, 7:15 and 9:45 p.m.
Keith’s—"Snow White and the
Seven Dwarfs,” film history's greatest
sensation—that's all: 11:51 a.m., 1:51,
3:51, 5:51, 7:51 and 9:51 p.m.
Trana-Lux—News and shorts. Con
tinuous from 10 a.m. to midnight.
Little—“Anthony Adverse," revival
of the film version of the Hervey
Allen novel: 11:27 a.m., 1:56, 4:36,
6:57 and 9.28 p.m.
Belasco—"Mayerling.” Charles Boy
er and Danielle Darrieux in the much
acclaimed French picturization of a
tragic royal romance: 11:50 a.m., 1:50,
3:50, 5.50, 7;50 and 9:50 p.m.
New Fields Film.
"gEHIND THE EIGHT BALL” ha*
been selected as the title of the
W. C. Fields Paramount starring pro
duction which has been in preparation
under the title, "Things Began to Hap
pen."
The film will go into production next
month, with Theodore Reed directing
and Paul Jones producing.
— ——•--—■ —
‘Lives’ Retagged.
LIGHTLY MARRIED” has been
selected as the title for Mervyn
LeRoy’s production for M-G-M of
“Private Lives.” Fernand Gravet will
star in the film upon his return from
Switzerland in April.
Loretta Young Tires
Of Zanuck’s Grind
Sonja Henie’s Romance With
Richard Greene Is Latest. 9
Miriam Hopkins Idle.
Shtilah Graham.
| By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD, March as (N.A.N.A.).—Loretta Young will Join Agent
Selznlck In his light on her behalf against Twentieth Century-Fox.
But for a different reason. Selznlck Is trying to raise his client's
picture price from $35,000. But Loretta is much more anxious for
a rest between 111ms—now denied her because of Boss Darryl Zanuck’s edict
that all 111ms on his lot must be completed by early summer, so that he
can vacation for eight weeks. 4
- 1
Hollywood's latest publicity romance
—Sonja Henie and Richard Oreene.
Maybe this one will prove as profitable
as Sonja’s with Tyrone Power . . .
Sartorial sight of the week: Margaret
Sullavan wearing a blue handkerchief
cocked over one
eye, gray plaid
slacks, red and
white moccasins,
no make-up, and
a c c ompanled by
three mas culine
escorts. Which
should give us
women food for
thought.
Robeit Taylor
and Barbara
Stanwyck spotted
at the Brown
Derby at a very
secluded table
and looking very bored with it all . ..
The way things change. Miriam Hop
kins went the works in publicizing
Anton Litvak when he first arrived in
town. Now her husband is sitting
pretty, directing one picture after an
other. While Miriam is awaiting a
film job. (Her last flicker, "Wise
Olrl,” was pretty tepid) ... Lew Ayres
finds it hard to portray a drunk in
"Holiday’’ because of a bowing ac
quaintance only with the liquid that
cheers.
Constance Bennett's decision to re
tire from the movies after her next
picture means she will devote her
abundant energies to her successful
cosmetics business. Connie is a strange
paradox. 8he is one of the most un
popular of the stars in Hollywood—
except with her servants, all of whom
have been in her service for 10 years
or more. Perhaps those regular six
month salary increases, plus the large
bonus at Christmas, have a big some
thing to do with it.
Sights and sounds in the M-O-M
commissary . . . Robert Young in
skin tights, calf-length boots, a yellow
wig coming to a pigtail point at the
back, a 1938 sports coat, a dress shirt,
no collar and professing complete ig
norance of the reason for the weird
get-up. "They Just yanked me out of
‘Three Comrades,’ and put me in
these” . . . Robert Montgomery telling
Dashiel Hammett he would like to
bring "Aaron Slick from Pumpkin
Crick” to the screen . . . Maureen
O’Sullivan saying, “You make me
glow all over,” to congratulations
anent her fine performance In "Port
of the Seven Seas” (originally titled
“Fanny”—but changed at the com
mand of the Hays office) . . , And
Dorothy Parker and Alan Campbell
replying to questions concerning their
two days in New York with Hunt
Stromberg. “Every one In New York
looked so honest and s'neere. In
Hollywood, every one seems crazy.
How well you’re looking (to Passerby
Scott Fitzgerald).” “It's the glow from
the electric light,” replies the author.
"That’s what I mean,” says Dotty.
“Every one’s crazy in Hollywood.”
Shirley Temple’s successor in the
cute baby-girl roles is being secretly
groomed at Twentieth Century-Fox.
Her name is Joan Carroll. The studio
says she is 5 years old, but Joan says
she is 6. She Is the image of Shirley,
wears the same type of clothes that
Shirley wore at the beginning of her
career, can sing and dance and pos
sesses masses of golden curls. (I fear
the worst.)
Did you know that fine actor, Walter
Huston, cannot make the grade at the
picture box office? It doesn’t make
sense to this columnist . . . Claude
Rains told me over steaks at Perino’s
that, with his own hands, he fashioned
the cradle to carry Daughter Jennifer
to the family farm in Pennsylvania.
(These tough guys of the screen!)
According to Alan Mowbray—"Every
one is worrying himself to death, with
very little thought given to the proper
way to worry. There are too many
amateurs, too many people worrying
today who have not had experience in
jrorrying. It requires concentration.
Constant thinking." There's a lot in
what worried Mr. Mowbray has to say.
Sign over the Rita brothers' dressing
room trailer—"Through these portals
pass the most beautiful boys in the
world!”
(Copyright. 1838. by the North Amer.CiS
Newspaper Alliance, Inc.)
Luise Rainer Back
At Work Again.
g EG INNING her first picture sinee
winning the academy actress
award for the second straight year,
Luise Rainer has started work in
"Mile. Froufrou” at the Metro
Goldwyn-Mayer studios. It Is Miss
Rainer's first film sinee "Big City"
with Spencer Tracy.
Melvyn Douglas and Robert Young
appear opposite the star with Bar
bara O’Nell, H. B. Warner, Alma
Kruger, Walter Kingsford, Margaret
Irving, Leonard Penn, Clarence Muse,
Lillian Yarbo, Libby Taylor and Clin
ton Rosemore in the supporting cast.
Richard Thorpe directs. This story
of New Orleans in 1850 was adapted
by Zoe Akins from a French drama
by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Helevy.
Merian C. Cooper is the producer.
AMUSEMENTS. I
AMUSEMENTS.
AMUSEMENTS.
AMUSEMENTS.
TWE most romantic setting that America ever knew! The
greatest drama of love and adventure ever played on
Broadway's stage! Brought to the screen by mighty M-G-M to
give you heart-thrills never before equalled!...See the love story
of the bandit and the beauty! Thrill with the glorious sweet
hearts of *Maytime* and 'Rose Marie* in their greatest triumph!
Funny Buddy Ebson loronadot
Joanotto MacDonald on hit flutol
Bandit Lao Carrillo will hold you
for a thousand-laugh ransom I
'
WITH
WAITER UO BURRY
PIDGEON • CARRILLO • EBSEN
A Robert Z. Leonard Production
Screen Ploy by Isabel Down and Boyce DeOow
Based on the Ploy by David Be Iosco
Directed by Robert Z. Leonard
Produced by Wm. Anthony McGuire
A METRO-GO LDWYN-MAYER PICTURE
STARTS LOEW'S
FRIDAY at PALACE
NOW—Lost 3 Days
chas. McCarthy in
GOLDWYN FOLLIES
AMUSEMENTS.
I LAST 3 DAYS
7th WEEK.!
siwwvJSrra
■am
SEVEN BWABES
AMD a NEW EDITION Of
'THE MAICN •( TIME'
S*uG~f FRIDAY...1
KATHARINE HEPBURN
• nd CARY GRANT ia
**BR I NO IM 0 UP BABY’’
W&r FREDRfc
P^ MARCH u
flfflflONH ADVERSE
■» OLIVIA it HAVILLAND *
_Cuy.eR«,s. Bills Mia*
rRANS’LUX Mi'iku^
AUSTRIA COUP—SPECIAL M
HITLER ENTERS VIENNA - ■
u SPECTACULAR. EXCITING
^^SHORTSUBJECTslfl|l
_AMUSEMENTS.
I ^ TMight St tiSO
Papular Mata. Tamar. 1 Rat.
-Ear t Weeks. lad. laa. Nlakt. Apr! $
Nlakta. 65a ta lt.lt TAX
I Mata.. S5a ta I1.M INC.
ST BETTE DAVIS®
M "JEZEBEL"!
fj „ WmmmtmTr<■■*«* in
S tanrfwy -fiaBnit B
0 I
Fj Mi Av»r Jcmim* • flidio ItofMi tj
FI nyonttai r!
oartturairaiiW
Gaty COOPER 1 ML.
in EM UMsch'j l»| PARADE
1 "BLUEBEARD'S Jr™5*5
k mi wirMssssz
"All the world's a Stage"
Learn te plar year part with eea
fldence—Start New.
GREET
DRAMATIC ACADEMY
The La Salle—1028 Conn. Are.
New TEN-WEEK Term Bogins
Monday, April 4th
Children'! Claim Saturday MernlnCi.
Studio equipped for voice reeordine.
Tel. Me. 3IB1
SOMETHING TO BE SEEN AGAIN 4 AGAIN
CHARLES HOW
ACADEMY
E. Lawrence Phillips’ Theatre Beautiful
Continuous From 4:30 P.M.
“STAGE DOOR,’’
Starring KATHARINE HEPBURN GINGER
ROGERS and ADOLPHE MFNJOU.
•KINO SOLOMON’S MINES. with
CEDRIC HARDWICKE.
CAROLINA Air-Conditioned
’’ON SUCH A NIGHT,’ and BEHIND
THE MIKE."
nBri 17 Home of Mirronbonie Sonnd
LlltLLL Penna. Are. at 21st St.
Matinees Toes., Tburs., Sat.. San.
ALLAN JONES and JUDY GARLAND In
EVERWODY SING. Comedy.
DUMBARTON 134Air^Cond?t*!med T*’
WHEELER and WOOLSEY in ’’HIGH
FLYERS.” Also News and Comedies.
riipi AWN anacostia. d. c.
rAIKLAYTPI Air-Conditioned
JOEL McCREA and BOB BURNS In
"WELLS FARGO.’’
CONGRESS Portland St. S.E.
CLAUDETTE COLBERT in ’TOVARICH."
I inn M St. N.W.
aJlrvr Double Feature
ONSLOW STEVENS. HELEN MACK in
"YOU CAN’T BUY LUCK." Also
GEORGE O’BRIEN in "PARK AVENUE
LOGGER."
IITTIF 688 »■> n.w.
Ml ILL Air-Conditioned
FREDRIO MARCH in
“ANTHONY ADVERSE.”
PRINfFCC 1119 H St. N.E.
Double Feature
KATHARINE HEPBURN. GINGER ROGERS
and ADOLPHE MENJOU In "STAGE
DOOR.” Also SALLY BLANE fti
"CRASHIN’ THRU DANGER."
CFm *144 Georgia Awe.
sneer Spring. Md
_Continuous Prom 6:00 P.M.
"WISE GIRL." starring MIRIAM HOP
KINS and RAY MILLAND._
CTANTftN «» C 81s. N.E.
ulAniUn Finest Sonnd Eonlnment
Continuous From fi.30 P.M.
IRENE DUNNE in
‘High, Wide and Handsome.”
“SATURDAY’S HEROES,”
With VAN HEFLIN and MARIAN MARSH.
TAKOMA 4th and Bntternat Sts.
IAfVUHlA No Parklnr Troubles
Jack Oakie and Lily Pons in
“HITTING A NEW HIGH.”
BORIS KARLOFF in
“WEST OF SHANGHAI.”
HIPPODROME poVIV^m
DOROTHY LAMOUR in
“HURRICANE.”
Also March of Time.
CAMEO M£onrafYMMD
Myrna Loy and Franchot
Tone in “Man Proof.”
Feature Approx. 7:25 9:25.
A Dr A nr hyattsville. md.
AKUWl. Cont. 6-11 P.M.
Lee Tracy. “Crashing Hollywood.”
Paul Lukas. "Dinner at the Hits.”
RICHMOND ALEXANDRIA. VA.
Will Rogers. "County Chairman.”
Drrn ALEXANDRIA, va.
IlCEiI/ Today-Tomorrow
Grant Richards. “My Old Kentucky
Home.”
Free Parking Space—800 Oars.
Mil ft ROCKVILLE. MD."
RULl/ Cont. 7-11 P.M.
W. C. FIELDS in “BIG
BROADCAST OF 1938.”
Feature Approx. 7:25. 9:25.
MARLBORO
CHARLES LAUGHTON,
“Ruggles of Red Gap.”
_Feature Approx. 7:25. 9:30.
STATE-BETHESDA Itetheada!' MdU*
LEE TRACY in
‘CRASHING HOLLYWOOD.’
• Shown at A:00. 8.(K>.
LILY PONS in
“HITTING A NEW HIGH.”
■hows At 7:10. »:00.
va
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££
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Theaters Harinr Daily Matinee*
CALVERT
i3,Clere!an*dl*a34^T*'
W C FIELDS** MARTHAMRAYE in
'BIG BROADCAST OF 1838 "
Shown at 2:00. 3:56. 6.50, 7:45,
CENTRA! i~s »»h st n.w.
VUIIML Phene Mat. *841
__Onens 11:00 A.M.
FR^??iIC MARCH and FRANCISKA
GAAL in "THE BUCCANEER "
Shown at 11:00, 1:26. 3:56. 8:20,
8:50. Short.
PRNN' 650~Pa. Artnaa 8.E."
rtntl „ .. Un^o'" *17#
_ _ Matinee. 2:(W>M.
W.C. FIELDS. MARTHA RAYE in
'BIG BROADCAST OF 1838 "
Shown at 2:00. 3:60. 6:40, 7:35.
SHERIDAN Gst. n \.8nh*^SS
_Matinee. 1:00 F.M.
^SSpRIC MARCH and FRANCISKA
GAAL in THE BUCCANEER ••
Shown at 12:30, 2:45, 6:00. 7:15,
»:30. News._
TIVOLI 14 ••‘SJ- * Park Bd. N.W.
11 T UU Phone Col. 1800
„ _ Matinee. 2.00 F.M.
Wdop,M.4PJrSA RATE and
OOROTHY LaAMOUR in *'RTO
BROADCAST OP 1838." 8h”wn
v—V00i 3:1}S' 6:60' ":45, 8;4°
Adrenturea Show
_ Saturday Mornlna at 10:30 A.M.
UPTOWN £.OB?.- *»•. end Newark
N.W. Clay. 8400.
Mallnee, 2:00 F.M.
W1.y"in^.£ow,CLL- ANNABELLA in
BARONESS AND THE BUTLER ••
Shown at 2:00. 3:56. 5:45. 7715
0 35. Also March nr Time!’ ‘ °‘
Thealera Marine Ere. Perfetmaneee
AMBASSADOR AS?" &*«S2k
BETTE DAVIS in '£f i ZE B #L *
, Shown at 5:45, 7:30. 8:30. News
APOLLO Ph6.** *837*
C'Vi»<v'B(LOMS^?r)' raEr> MaeMUR
RAY in "TRUE CONFESSION "
Shown at 8:15. 8:10, 10:05. Alio
_March of Time and Newsreel.
AVALON M1a^S:n*AV^:w
FRANK MORGAN. ROBERT YOUNG
in PARADISE FOR THREE"
_Shown at 6:20. 7:55. 8:40
AVE. GRAND “ift. eT
NELSON EDDY and ELEANOR
Powell in -Rosalie!" shown
_at 6.40. 8 10. Short Subject.
COLONY 4935C?.*:,&A nw
CiUlOLE LOMBARD. FRED MacMUR
RAY in 'TRUE CONFESSION "
Shown at 6:20, 8:00. 8:45. Short.
HOME ’ML?,
JOAN CRAWFORD and BPINCIR
SAVOY
DOROTHY LAMOUR JONHALLm
"THE HURRICANE” Shown at
5:45._7j40^9:40. Alao Carton
YORK 9&'.ARw.m‘L,?V?i3
at S:4B. 7:40. 9:3S. Newgael
NEWTON ,*‘hs,VnVN«,wt”_
“Radio City Revels,”
BOB BURNS, JACK OAK1S.
_Matinee. 2:00 P.M
JESSE THEATER
“Paradise for Three,”
FRANK MORGAN. ROBERT YOUNG
SYLVAN
“WELLS FARGO,”
_JOEL McCREA. FRANCES DB
PALM THEATER
“ARSENE LUPIN
RETURNS,”
Y1ROINIA BRUCE, MELVTN DOUG
LABS.
ARLINGTON, VA.
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CRT TAYLOR and MAUREEN O BUL
1TAN in ”A YANK AT OXFOUb”
ITON Clarandan. Ya.
r BENNETT and HENRY FONDA la
MET MY LOVE AGAIN.”
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
TIT no PARKING I rp
It WORRIES LXt
1. FIELDS and I GARY COOPER and
THA RAY* in I FRANCHOT TONE

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