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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, March 30, 1938, Image 34

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1938-03-30/ed-1/seq-34/

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Irish Dramatist Puzzled
By Success in U. S.
Paul V. Carroll Still Thinks He Will
Return to the Old Country
As a School Teacher.
By JAY CARMODY.
THESE Irish playwrights mean what they'say. At least Paul Vincent
Carroll does. Mr. Carroll, author of "Shadow and Substance,” most
sensational play out of Ireland in many a year, proved as much yester
day afternoon, when he came here to speak at Catholic University.
"Where,” asked an interviewer quickly, “did you get the character Brigid
in your play?”
"It still is none of any one's damned business,” said Mr. Carroll.
And how does that make Mr. Carroll mean what he says? Very simply.
I/.J vu VUU3 LUUmiJ,
which has enormously surprised him
by its energy and zeal, Mr. Carroll was
prevailed upon to write a piece for the
papers (specifically the New York
Times) about his astonishing play.
Pari of the article was an explanation
of the origin of his various characters.
All of them, Mr. Carroll intimated,
were persons taken from life: this one
from his experience as school teacher
in Glasgow, that one from his experi
ence as a curious Irishman. About
them all Mr. Carroll spoke with that
honesty which is almost disconcertingly
characteristic of his race. All except
Brigid, that is.
“Where I found Brigid,” he wrote at
that time, “is none of any one's damned
business.”
And on that point Ireland's most
phenomena! playwright since Sean
O'Casey stands very pat today. Even
when the question is sprung upon him
suddenly, Mr. Carroll says with a laugh
that it is none of any one's damned
business. Apparently he is speaking
the absolute truth and there is noth
ing beyond the absolute truth. Julie’s
origin still is none of any one’s damned
business.
But all other things about Mr. Car
roll are. Although he is astonished
still by the enormous enterprise of
American newspaper people to inter
view him, he no longer is ill at ease
about it. He finds newspaper people
in this country all right in spite of
their zealousness. He is not accustomed
to their zeal, however. In Ireland you
can write a play and not be bothered
by the press. Over here you can't so
Mr. Carroll has learned to answer ques
tions with a charm that would elect
him alderman of the third ward if he
were running for alderman of the
third ward.
* * * *
\yHAT does he look like, this man
who wrote a play about which
George Jean Nathan, even, went per
ceptibly delirious? Well, he is small,
well below average in height.
Maybe he is 5 feet 4, or 5, inches
tall. He is 38 years old, although one
P AX ARMOR?
IXOIIer SILVER SPRING, MD.
Even Evenino Except
dKaring Mon., i so to io.-so
ADMISSION _10c
SKATES _3o«
Special rates to skating parties over 40
on Tues. and Wed.
Phone Shep. 1506 S. S. 761
THEATER PARKING
6 P.M. TO
1 A.M.
CAPITAL GARAGE Aft
NEW OIL BURNER BUYERS
who have installed clean, comfortable
automatic Sherwood Oil Heat include:
Frank & Thomas Noonan
1300 S Street S E.
Bernard J. Buechling
1607 Addison Chapel Rd,. Beaver Heights,
Md.
Mrs. Minta Howe
434 Park Rd. N.W.
Day after day, all over town, more and
more Washington home owners choose:
SHERWOOD OIL BURNERS
FIND OUT WHY BEFORE YOU BUY
Phone DEratur4181,orstopattheSherwood Oil
Burner Showrooms, 1723Connecticut A ve.,N.W.
■bJjVfl North Cap. St. and
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Our Chefs |
Him Know Food— J
iMM£ Jb —-and know how to pre- M
pare it for vour enjoy- M
ment' here tonight. ML
t— _j. —
DANCING.
ACHER'S STUD 10,1313 G St. N.W.
Classes Fri.. !» p m. Private lessons by
Spnointment. Studio lor rent.
Nationa 1__.S9 Hi._ Established 1900- *
ISotr—Tico Entire Floors
DON MARTINI
Waltz, Fox Trot, Tap, Tango, Rumba
CULTURED. TALENTED TEACHERS
Beginners Given Special Attention
1811 H St. N.W. SfcSX
*
minute he looks 50, the next about 26.
When he is interested in your ques
tion his forehead gathers as many
wrinkles (of thought) as a harp has
strings. When he isn’t he is a bland
looking little man who seems to be
much too wise to deceive either him
self or you. Or to be deceived by
anything for that matter.
Mr. Carroll is now making $800
weekly in royalties from his successful
play. Until it was a success he made
approximately $17 per week as a
teacher in the grade schools of Scot
land. The enormous largesse of this
country still is unbelievable to him.
He still thinks in terms of his school
teacher salary. It is real; the royalty
from the play is not. The latter came
too suddenly. Because he has a wife
and three children to support, Mr.
Carroll thinks he will go back to teach
ing school. He does not try to write
commercially successful plays anyhow.
He is one playwright who can say he
wouldn’t know about commercially
successful plays and make you believe
it. So you believe him, also, when he
talks about going back to Scotland and
teaching school. Maxwell Anderson
maybe could not make you think he
would go back to being a city editor
in Terre Haute. Ind., but it is easy to
assume that Mr. Carroll is really naive
about success in the American theater
when he talks about his old job.
Even though you did not believe it
he does. You cannot see where
Eddie Dowling, his producer, would be
foolish enough to let him go back to
his old job when he happens to be one
of the period's most eloquent drama
tists. But Mr. Carroll is seeing it from
his perspective, not from yours. He
has the humility of a great artist. He
has no idea, in spite of one of the
year’s most successful plays, that he
is a great artist. He is just a school
teacher who will go on writing plays
which, if they bring in $80Q a week
royalties, will surprise him more than
any one else in the world.
Mr. Carroll, in all sincerity, tells an
anecdote which demonstrates his view
point perfectly. It concerns Julie
Haydon, the marvelous Brigid of his
play, and himself.
“We were walking up the street (in
New York) the other night,” he says.
“A hag approached us and asked for
money to provide her with a bed for
the night. I reached in my pocket
and gave her a nickel. Julie, however,
gave her $2. Believe it or not, I
chased the hag for blocks thinking to
get back the money. She got away
though.”
The $17-a-week school teacher can
not understand such American prof
ligacy. Not any more than he can
understand the $800 a week royalties
from his play. His lack of understand
ing on that point is what makes one
believe he will go on being a great
playwright; perhaps never understand
ing that when you have made good in
this country you have made good.
Money does not seem to be his criterion
of success. He makes that fact sound
like something tremendously impor
tant.
* % * *
'T'HAT Italian being spoken so lim
pidly in the Raleigh's Pall Mall
room yesterday at noon came from the
vocal chords of Tony Muto. Interna
tional Alliance of Theatrical Stage
Employes, on the one hand and Mario
Di Polo, Raleigh orchestra maestro,
on the other. Before the conversation
dropped into Italian, Mr. Muto talked
with a part of the press about the
basic theater and movie union. Talked
about his new job and its many inter
esting ramifications. Then, because
their names both end in “o,” he and
Mr. Di Polo spent a few minutes on
Italian singers, composers and musi
cians in general. Interluded were a
few excerpts about the art of acting,
the advantages of world travel and
the genius of Chaliapin. Mr. Muto,
who came to the I. A. T. S. E. from
the Hays (Will) office, is not only a
movie critic, but a chap who knows
his music. Even to the point of why
Latin temperaments never really like
Wagner. Mr. Di Polo knew also . . .
“Girl of the Golden West,” which pre
cedes “In Old Chicago” into the
Palace, was screened yesterday by
Loew's. Today Warner Bros, will do
the same thing for “Bluebeard's Eighth
Wife” and tonight “In Old Chicago”
will be shown to an audience of 1,000
persons at the National Press Qub.
-•
Play Tryouts Set
For Tonight.
'J'RYOUTS will be held for parts In
"Moonlight and Honeysuckle” at
the Central Community Center, Thir
teenth and Clifton streets N.W., to
night at 8:15 o’clock.
The play will be produced some
time in May, under the direction of
Eileen Fowler, whose recent produc
tion, "Alison's House,” was so suc
cessful. The tryouts will be held in
room 125.
AMUSEMENTS.
_AMUSEMENTS.
STARTING FRIDAY.
BKO KEITHS”
A WASHINGTON INSTITUTION
| AS A COMEDIENNE.. ain’t that somathing.. I
You have seen har in many great
| pictures but tuuC 'till you see
, EPBURN
in a downpour ot uproar
PH the year's best comedy.. I
J "BRINGING UP BABY"
PT end co-vtairing
f CARY GRANT
* better than anything he
has ever done including
* "THE AWFUL TRUTH”
An RKO RADIO Pictura with
CHARLIE RUGGLES • MAY ROBSON
ARRY FITZGERALD • WALTER CATLETT
last a DAYS
-SNOW WHITE end ft* SEVEN DWARFS'*
Johnny Comes to Call
Harrison Libbey is the young fellow looking up at Lansing
Hall in this scene, which happens to be a scene from the Wash
ington Civic Theater’s production of “Johnny Johnson,” in which
Mr. Libbey plays the title role. T^xe F. Cowles Strickland
directed. effort will run through Saturday night at the Wardman
Park Theater.
Where and When
Current Theater Attractions
and Time of Showing.
National—"You Can't Take It With
You,” Broadway’s prize comedy of a
mad family circle: 2:30 and 8:30 p.m.
Earle—"Jezebel,” Bette Davis in a
story that is almost "Gone With the
Wind”: 10:50 a.m., 1:35, 4:20, 7:10
and 9:55 p.m. Stage shows: 12:40,
3:30, 6:15 and 9:05 p.m.
Capitol—“Rebecca of Sunnybrook
Farm,” Shirley Temple in a new ver
sion of the story: 11:05 a.m.. 1:45,
4:30, 7:20 and 10:05 p.m. Stage
shows: 12:40, 3:20, 6:15 and 8:55 p.m.
Metropolitan—"A Slight Case of
Murder,” Gangland doings are made
very amusing: 11:35 a.m., 1:35, 3:35,
5:40, 7:40 and 9:45 p.m.
Palace — "The Goldwyn Follies,”
Charlie McCarthy and umpteen play
ers in one of the most pretentious
musicals: 11:10 a.m., 1:45, 4:20, 7 and
9:35 p.m.
Columbia—"Happy Landing,” Sonja
continues to skate: 11:50 a.m., 2:20,
4:45, 7:15 and 9:45 p.m.
Keith’s—"Snow' White and the
Seven Dwarfs,” film history's greatest
sensation—that’s all: 11:51 a.m., 1:51,
3:51, 5:51, 7:51 and 9:51 p.m.
AMUSEMENTS.
Trans-Lux—News and shorts. Con
tinuous from 10 a m. to midnight.
Little—"Anthony Adverse,” revival
of the film version of the Hervey Allen
novel: 11:27 a.m., 1:56, 4:36, 6:57 and
9:28 pm.
Belasro—"Mayerling,” Charles Boy
er and Danielle Darrieux in the much
acclaimed French picturization of a
tragic royal romance: 11:50 a m., 1:50,
3:50, 5:30, 7:40 and 9:50 p.m.
Role for Monty.
jyjONTY WOOLLEY, bearded char
acter actor in many films, has
joined the cast of "Three Comrades,”
M-G-M production starring Robert
Taylor and Margaret Sullavan with
Franchot Tone and Robert Young.
_AMUSEMENTS.
"All the world's a Stage"
Learn to play your part with con
fidence—Start Now.
GREET
DRAMATIC ACADEMY
The Lo Salle—1028 Conn. Aye.
New TEN-WEEK Term Begins
Monday, April 4th
Children's Classes Saturday Mornings.
Studio equipped for voice recording.
Tel. Me. glttl_
: ACADEMY of F"SSI ??"£d £?:n,0DllT
E. Lawrence Phillips’ Theatre Beautiful
Continuous From 4:«'10 P.M.
“STAGE DOOR,”
Starrinc KATHARINE HEPBURN GINGER
ROGERS and ADOLPHE MFN.TOU.
■KING SOLOMON’S MINES.’ with
CEDRIC HARDWICKE.
CAROLINA Air-Conditioned
“ON SUCH A NIGHT,’ and BEHIND
THE MIKE.’’
PIDri C Home of Mirronhonic Sound
UlXvLL Penn a. Ave. at 41st St.
Matinees Tues.. Thurs.. Sat.. Sun.
ALLAN JONES and JUDY GARLAND in
“EVERYBODY SING.’’ Comedy.
DUMBARTON" 134Air ^Conditioned
JOEL McCREA and FRANCES DEE in
■WELLS FARGO." Also News.
FAIRLAWN ^Air-Conditioned
JOEL McCREA and BOB BURNS In
■■WELLS FARGO." 5:15, 7:15. 9:15.
rnwrorcQ Nirhois a«. &
lUnuKLjJ Portland St. S.E.
CLAUDETTE COLBERT in ’TOVAillCH."
1 inn 3227 M St. N.W.
Lll/U Double Feature
ONSLOW STEVENS. HELEN MACK in
•YOU CAN T BUY LUCK. ” Also
GEORGE O BRIEN in •’PARK AVENUE
LOGGER."
I 1TTI P 6«8 9th 8t. N.W.
«1 lLt Air-Conditioned
FREDRIC MARCH in
“ANTHONY ADVERSE.”
ppiurrcc ms h st. n.e.
* IVin\,Ei33 Double Feature
KATHARINE HEPBURN. GINGER ROGERS
and ADOLPHE MENJOU in "STAGE
DOOR." Also SALLY BLANE in
’■CRASHIN’ THRU DANGER."
crrn • 8244 Georgia Ave.
utw Silver Spring. Md.
Continuous From 6:00 P.M.
"WISE GIRL.” starring MIRIAM HOP
KINS and RAY MILLAND._
CTANTON 6th and C Sts. N.E.
dlAIl 1U11 Finest Sound Euuinment
Continuous From 6:30 P.M.
IRENE DUNNE in
“High, Wide and Handsome.”
“SATURDAY’S HEROES,”
With VAN HEFLIN and MARIAN MARSH.
TAIfftMA 4th and Butternut Sts.
1 AlkUlYlA No Parking Troubles
Jack Oakie and Lily Pons in
“HITTING A NEW HIGH.”
BORIS KARLOFF in
“WEST OF SHANGHAI.”
HIPPODROME Double Feature
Claudette Colbert. “I Met Him in
Paris.” Joe E. Brown, "Polo Joe."
r a urn mt. rainier, md.
r/s lARltU Cont. 6-11 P.M.
Myrna Loy and Franchot
■J Tone in “Man Proof.”
j. Feature Approx. 6. 7:60. 9:46.
W ARCADE BI£%lEPMm
Z Lee Tracy. "Crashing Hollywood.'
Paul Lukas, “Dinner at the Ritz.”
33 RICHMOND ALT**ay^Tomor''A"
.. . Walter Connolly. Jean Parker in
g “Penitentiary."
S REED ALEXANDRIA. VA.
O Grant Richards, “My Old Kentucky
•-fi Home."
y Free Parking Space—800 Cars.
b** MW A ROCKVILLE. MD.
IVllLl/ Cont. 7-11 P.M.
Lee Tracy, "Crashing Hollywood.”
MARLBORO
Chas. Laughton. "Ruggles of Red
_Gap." Feature approx. 7:25. 9:.’!0.
STATE-BETHESDA <Bethesda!' Md!*
LEE TRACY in
‘CRASHING HOLLYWOOD.’
Shown at 6:00. 8:00.
LILY PONS in
“HITTING A NEW HIGH.”
Shown at TiAO. 0:60.
* t
It
o
c o
£2
gS
5g
't*
o
Bh
Theater* Havinr Daily Matineei
fAfVFRT 2324 Wisconsin Are.
V/U,*LI\1 Cleveland 2345
Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
VIRGINIA BRUCE MELVYN DOUG
LAS in "ARSENE LUPIN RE
TURNS. Shown at 2:00. 3:55,
■ i .»n. 7:45. 0:40. March of Time.
CFNTRAI 423 oth st. ~N.wr
V. L111 ftftL Phone Met. 2811
__ Open* 11:00 4.M.
fredric march-franciska gaai.
in - THE BUCCANEER" Shown
at 11-1:25-3:33-0:20-8:50.
PFNN 650 Pa. Avenue S.E.
I 151111 Lincoln 2179
Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
W. C. FIELDS-MARTHA RAYE in
BIG BROADCAST OF 1938 ”
Shown at 2-3:60-5:40-7:35-0:25.
SHERIDAN °li.
Matinee. 1:00 P.M.
WILLIAM POWELL. ANNABELLA in
• BARONESS AND THE BUTLER"
Shown at 1:35. 3:35, 5:35, 7:35,
9:35, Also March of Time.
TIVOI I 11 th I1' * Park Rd. N.W.
II tULI Phone Col. 1800
Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
VIRGINIA BRUCE. MELVYN DOUG
LAS in "ARSENE LUPIN RE
TURNS" Shown at 2:00. 3:55.
5:50. 7:40, 9:40. ' American Ad
ventures. " Show Saturday morning
at 10:30._
UPTOWN Conn. Ave. and Newark
UriUTTIl St. N.W. Clev. 5100.
Matinee. 2:00 P.M.
"GOLD IS WHERE YOU FIND IT"
with GEORGE BRENT. OLIVIA De
HAVILLAND. CLAUDE RAINS and
MARGARET LINDSAY. Shown at
2:00, :t:65, 5:55, 7:50, 9:60.
Newsreel. _
Theaters Having Eve. Performances
AMBASSADOR iSS*
BETTE DAVIS in JEZEBEL." Shown
_ at 5:45. 7:30, 9:30. News._
ADftl I ft 624 H St. N.E.
Phone Line. 3375
ALLAN JONES. JUDY GARLAND in
"EVERYBODY SING." Shown at
_ti:()0. 7:55, 9:56. Popular Science.
AVAinN 6612 Conn. Ave. N.W.
HfALUll Cleveland 2000
FRANK MORGAN. ROBERT YOUNG
in "PARADISE FOR THREE."
_Shown at 0:20, 7:55. 9:40. Short.
AVE. GRAND64“Si.
NELSON EDDY and ELEANOR
POWELL In "ROSALIE." Shown
at 0:40. 9:10, short Subject.
COLONY 4935<&;^NW
FRANK MORGAN. ROBERT YOUNG
in "PARADISE FOR THREE."
_Shown at 0:16. 8:05, 9:55.
HHMF 1230 C St. N.E.
nUMEi Atlantic 8188
JOAN CRAWFORD and SPENCER
TRACY in "MANNEQUIN.'- Shown
_at 0:15. 8:00. 9:5i)._Cartoon.
SAVOY 3030 14th St. PLW.
lJM 1U1 Phone Col. 4008
DOROTHY LAMOUR, JON HALL In
• THE HURRICANE" Shown at
_5 45. 7:40, 9:40. Also Cartoon._
YORK 6a. Aye. and Quebec
limit Place N.W. Col. 4010
JOAN CRAWFORD and SPENCER
TRACY in "MANNEQUIN.” Shown
at 6:45, 7:40, 9:3jJ. Newsreel.
NEWTON l~th s *»?dN jE*wton
“Radio City Revels,”
BOB BURNS, JACK OAKIE.
_Matinee, 2:00 P.M._
JESSE THEATER 18tsh„VETin*
“Paradise for Three,”
FRANK MORGAN, ROBERT YOUNG.
SYLVAN 1*Ave!'dN.W L
“WELLS FARGO,”
_JOEL McCREA, FRANCES DEE.
PALM THEATER deiVaray
“RADIO CITY REVELS,”
BOB BURNS. JACK OAKIE.
ARLINGTON, VA.
WILSON oS^cSSSS S8&.
ROBERT TAYLOR and MAUREEN 0 8UL
LIVAN in “A YANK AT OXFORD.”
ASHTON Clarendon. Vs.
GARY COOPER and FRANCHOT TONE In
'LIVES OF A BENGAL LANCER."
FALLS CHURCH, VA.
STATF NO PARKING I EE
MAIL worries LLL
ROBERT TAYLOR I ELEANOR HOLM
and MAUREEN I JARRETT and
HMP I
i
‘Mother Carey’s Chickens’
Lead to Joan Bennett
Ginger Rogers Is too Busy to Make
Picture Bought for Her by
R-K-O Radio.
«
By SHEILAH GRAHAM.
HOLLYWOOD, March 30 (N.A.N.A.).—"Mother Carey’s Chickens,” the
Kate Douglas Wiggin favorite owned by R-K-O Radio, was bought for the
express purpose of starring Ginger Rogers last Summer. But Ginger was busy
with "Vivacious Lady," “Stage Door” and "Having Wonderful Time.” And
so the chick opus was shelved until May 1. But Ginger 1s still busy—busier, in
fact, than ever before. Sooner than shelve the story again, Ginger’s part has
neen given to Joan Bennett. The*;
sister to assist her (sorry) is little I
Anne Shirley, w,ho is grateful for the
opportunity to
appear in an "A”
production. Alice
Brady, who did
such a good job
of mothering in
"In Old Chi
cago,” is being
considered for the
Mother Carey
role.
Margaret Sul
lavan finished her
part in "Three
Comrades” Tues
day morning. In
the afternoon,
Sheilah Graham.
Margaret was emoting with Jimmy
Stewart (godfather of her baby
daughter) in “Shopworn Angel."
which is pretty fast work even for
Miss Sullavan. She replaces Rosa
lind Russell, who replaced Joan Craw
ford. Miss Russell couldn’t make it
because of a previous promise to do
"The Citadel" In London with Rob
ert Donat. Also in “Shopworn Angel"
are Walter Pidgeon, Jack Hutchinson,
recruit from the Naval Reserves, and
wealthy-man-about-town Roger Con
verse. Youthful Hank Potter directs.
Walter Abel has decided to devote
the next few years to building up a
screen reputation. In the past. Wal
ter has divided his talents between
Hollywood and Broadway, with very
bad results for his prospects in pic
tures. Not only is the public likely
to forget screen absentees, but also
the producers, which is equally im
portant when it comes to casting for
important roles. Abel's first picture
under his new- schedule is “Comet
Over Broadway," starring Bette Da
_ AMUSEMENTS.
HARP RECITAL
Edythe Marmion Brosius
Nationally Known Concert Harpist
FRIDAY, April 1, 4:30
Sl'LGRAVE CLUB. 1801 M«*i. Art.
Admission* 91.Aft; Including Tas.
vis with George Brent. Another fat
part in this film goes to Ian Keith,
who last appeared as the politician
renegade in “Buccaneer.”
“A Star Is Born” depicted the Hol
lywood of the movies. “Menial Star,”
from the R-K-O Radio stable, will
show you Hollywood as it is really
lived by the residents of this fabulous
village—the actual people in the
streets, in the stores and the unpub
licized cafes and night haunts. It
should be quite interesting. Lucille
Ball is the star, with Character Actor
Richard Lane opposite. Lane has ap
peared in 50 pictures during the past
two years.
Production quickies . . . Robert
Benchley should be a riot in his next
short, "How to Raise a Baby” . . . The
three smart girls—Deanna Durbin,
Nan Grey and Barbara Read—will be
reunited in "The Three Smart Girls
Leave Town” . . , "Enemy Territory”
will use the same cast and director
now working in "Three Comrades”—
Robert Taylor, Margaret Sullavan,
Franchot Tone, Robert Young and
Frank Borzage . . . Barbara Stanwyck
AMUSEMENTS.
TRANS-LUX
__I
u COMEDY, CARTOON. IT1/...U
^SKSHORTSUBJECTsjgsl
‘'He U deeply i part of the culture and
background of Chopin himself.'’—N. Y.
Times.
ST0J0WSKI
ALL CHOPIN PIANO RECITAL
Sulcrave Club. Tomorrow Eve.. H.I.V
Seats, SI. 10. at Mrs. Dorsey's.
I‘tOO G (Droop's). NAtlonal 7151, or
at ddor.
leaves the blacklist through her prom
ise to star In "Always Goodby" for "
Twentieth Century-Fox . . . Olivia de
Havilland will be replaced by Gloria
Dickson for the role opposite George
Brent in "The Valley of the Giants.”
Following "Fidelity,” Joan Crawford
plays the lead in "The House of Glass,”
recently purchased by M-G-M . . .
Kay Francis becomes quite the family
woman in "My Bill,” with no fewer
than six children—among them 22
year-old Anita Louise, Bonita Gran
ville and Dickie Moore. It’s a sort of
"over the hill” weeper, with little
Dickie the only loyal chick in the
brood . . . When Tyrone Power re
turns from that Mexican jaunt he
will be very busy playing Ferdinand
de Lesseps in "Suez,” and Train Rob
ber Jesse James In “The Life of Jesse
James.”
The last authentic naval picture is
Warners’ forthcoming "Wings Over
the Navy,” starring George Brent and
Ronald Reagan. (The Navy is getting
shy of exposing technical secrets to
other countries) . , . Victor McLaglen
gets a role after his own heart in
"Hell’s Kitchen,” for Universal.
(Copyright, 1938. by the North American
Newspaper Alliance. Inc.)
_AMUSEMENTS.
_AMUSEMENTS.
TftDAY AT 2:30
* W.MGHT AT 8:30
For 2 Weeks. Incl. Son. Nitht,
^»ril 3
m
j_ Ni«ht». 55e to *2.75.
MATS. .7.-,c to *2.20, TAX INC.0
tout, from 4:30 to 11:30 P. M.
THIRD AND FINAL WEEK
CHARLES ^
V* * OanitH* Omrioao
FREDRIC
MARCH
flNTHONS ADVERSE
•«* OLIVIA dc HAV1LLAND ’
O^CDER«INS^^tJillvM«UCh
(TONIGHT Constitution I
■ wmuni Hill. 8:.!0 p.m. I
NATIONAL SYMPHONY
Han* Kindler, Conductor
Soloist
Richard Crooks, Tenor
Pinal Mid-Week Concert of Season!
Tickets. 50c to S'.50 Now on Sale
Julius Garflnckel & Co. Store., NA.
7310. After 7 P.M. at Hall, Me. ■»«»>!.
C. C. Cappel. Mgr.
I m NOW
£ CUTPT FY ■ “•••WWfllM ■
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I TEMPLE I VoNTGOMERY I
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I 1 — - I ClydcMcCOYfl
I “SPICES p^TlW,r Vi«.
! - I AC IBM” “•1 ” Orchestra I
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L”>TA"S 'i'u* BARRETTJ
Tense and Thrilling...
out of the adventurous West comes the red
blooded drama of the bold bandit and the excit
ing beauty...The singing sweethearts of "Maytime"
f and "Naughty Marietta" in their rousing triumph
...a grand entertainment leaps from the screen!
Hf«rS«£Af PAST WITH 10VE SONGS JEANETTE NELSON
By Sigmond Rombtrg and Out Kahn
' Soldi trt of Fortvot' 'Shadow* on tho Moon’
’Senorita’ ' Who Art W# to Say’
'Tht Wind in fht Trttt'
% Girl of the Golden III
WALTER PIDGEON ‘ LEO CARRILLO ‘ RUDDY EDSEN
A Robert Z. Leonard Production * Screen Play by Isabel Dawn and Boyce DeGaw
Based on the Play by David Belasco • Directed by Robert Z. Leonard
Produced by Wm. Anthony McGuire * A METRO-GOLDWYN* MAYER PICTURE
STARTS FRIDAY AT LOEW'S PALACE
NOW—LAST 2 DAYS: CHARLIE McCARTHY IN "GOLDWYN FOLLIES"

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