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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 06, 1938, Image 6

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VISITING NURSES
l. V. N. S. Staff Is Told of
Need of Insight Into
Human Material.
More than 150 persons many of
them In the blue uniforms of the
Instructive Visiting Nurse Society, at
tended the 38th anniversary luncheon
of the society yesterday in Barker
Hall, Young Women's Christian As
sociation.
Although many of those present
were guests interested in the society’s
service, board members and others,
Dr. Esther Richards, Johns Hopkins
University psychiatrist and principal
speaker, spoke directly to the nurses
when she urged them to “make your
patients feel that their difficulties are
yours while you are attending them.”
"Your job and mine,” she said, "is
not to cure and remodel our patients
but to teach them as best we can how
to live in reasonable equanimity with
the intellectual, social and personality
limitations of which they are a part.
Advises No Fretting.
“Above all,” she added, "enjoy the 1
day's work, not fretting over what
you have not done, for with each
dawn there is always a tomorrow.”
Dr. Richards stressed the need for
giving young doctors and nurses in
their student days some knowledge
of the behavioristic aspects of the
human material with which they
work.
She charged that without a knowl
edge of human nature the young
people in the medical profession be
come discouraged and disillusioned
w-hen they are "thwarted in their
altruistic strivings to reform the con
ditions associated with the way human
beings behave as they do.”
She traced the growth of instruc
tion along behavioristic lines, declar
ing that in many cases the social
factors within the home either give
rise to the illness, contribute to it
indirectly or result from it.
Two Instances Cited.
Two instances where nurses are
Riven an awareness of social and
mental conditions in the home were
cited.
One, which she termed the ideal
set-up. is the instruction being given
at the Eastern Health District in'
Baltimore, where undergraduate nurses I
of the Johns Hopkins Training School j
are given an opportunity to work in
public health as a part of their train
ing.
The other instance where educa
tional work is done, she said, is in
21 Maryland counties, where psychi
atric clinics are conducted by psy
chiatrists from the three State hos
pitals, and the intake of patients is
done through the county health nurse
and doctor.
Referring to the second type of
work, which she said can be done
in any rural community, she said: >
"There has been an actual demon
stration that the public health nurse
in rural sections, working under the 1
handicaps of hard traveling, distances
Memorial
(Continued From First Page.)
development of Washington and would
like to have a building that would
keep the axis open, or partly open,
and give the impression of the mag
nificence of the river beyond.”
The memorial is projected on the
axis of the White House. The Fine
Arts Commission, as Maj. Clarke ex
pressed it, is a non-partisan body,
with a guiding hand in the program
for developing the plan of Washing
ton. He considers the Thomas Jeffer
son Memorial's action in disregarding
the Fine Arts Commission's advice as
‘’unprecedented.”
Maj. Clarke declined to comment
on the alleged costliness of the
foundation for the memorial, pleading
that that is an engineering problem
with which his organization has no
concern. Asked about the advisabil
ity of holding a competition to secure
an adequate design for the memorial,
Maj. Clarke would only say:
"Competitions in the past have re
sulted in some of the best buildings
In Washington.” The method of se
curing an architect and sculptor, he
added, is not the job of the Fine Arts
Commission.
Original Design Disapproved.
Both the Fine Arts Commission and
the National Capital Park and Plan
ning Commission disapproved the
original design for the memorial, cre
ated by Mr. Pope, Maj. Clarke recalled
today. Both commissions, however,
agreed on the site south of the Tidal
Basin as suitable for a memorial.^
In his correspondenct with Chair
man Boylan, Maj. Clarke wrote that
the act creating the Memorial Com
mission states, in part, that it "may
avail itself of the assistance and ad
vice of the Commission of Fine Arts
and the Commission of Fine Arts
shall, upon request, render such as
sistance and advice.”
On February 5 of this year the
commission wrote to Chairman Boy
lan, saying that "it heartily approves
the site on the south cross axis of
the Mall, opposite the White House
from the south shore of the Tidal
Basin, but it has consistently opposed
the erection of a building on this site
la the form of a Roman pantheon.”
Site Is Flat.
Maj. Clarke declared: “The Com
mission of Fine Arts has given mast
thoughtful consideration to this mat
ter and after many prolonged discus
sions has concluded unanimously that
It is inadvisable to place a structure
of this type and design on the south
cross-axis of the Mall.
"The site on the south croes-axis of
the Mall is flat; beyond lie the broad
expanses of the Potomac. This site,
which the Commission of Fine Arts
has previously approved, calls for a
low, broad architectural mass, the
central axis open or partly open, with
a notal central figure or other sculp
tural composition dominating the sur
rounding structure designed to partly
inclose an area which will become the
shrine dedicated to the writer of the
Declaration of Independence. * • •
The site is the last one of Importance
in the central composition of the Na
tional Capital. The memorial erected
there should, we believe, not only be
suitable to the characteristics of a
great American, but as well suitable to
the site itself, thus to form an integral,
harmonised unit in the most distin
guished city plan in the world."
Letter te Boy Ian.
In a letter to Representative Boylan
under date of March 28, the commis
sion said that never, at any time, has it
"considered Mr. Pope’s Pantheon de
sign suitable for the site on the Tidal j
Basin; it has always expressed prefer* 1
I. V. N. S. Observes 38th Anniversary
Officials of the Instructive Visiting Nurse Society shown at the organization’s 38th anniver
sary luncheon yesterday.
Left to right are Richard Wilmer, vice president; Dr. Esther Richards of Johns Hopkins Hos
pital, the principal speaker at the luncheon, and Mrs. Harlan Fiske Stone, president.
_______ —Star Staff Photo.
and inadequate school and welfare
records, is eager to learn how to piece
together the fragments of human re
lationships involved in her work.”
Mrs. Harlan Fiske Stone, president
of the society, and Miss Gertrude H.
Bowling, executive director, gave brief
reports of the work of the society.
PARLEY TO DISCUSS
C. I. 0. AUTO DRIVE
Lewis and Officers of Car Union !
Will Meet Here Tomorrow
in Conference.
Plans for a drive to organize 20,000
salaried technical workers In the au
tomobile Industry under the banner
of the Committee for Industrial Or
ganization will be discussed at a con
ference here tomorrow between C. I. O.
Chairman John L. Lewis and officers
of the Federation of Architects, Engi
neers. Chemists and Technicians.
The drive will begin officially with
a conference of F. A. E. C. T. leaders
in Detroit Sunday, it was announced
from Washington offices of the or
ganization. The union plans to press
demands for restoration of the recent
10 per cent pay cut for salaried auto
workers.
The announcement here said 2,000
engineers affiliated with the F. A. E.
C. T. Monday to form a nucleus for
I organization. The 14 chapters of the
I new automobile division of the union,
iit said, are located in centers that
| have a potential membership of 20,000
engineers.
President Lewis. Alan Berne and
National Organizational Director Mar
j cel Slierer of the F. A. E. C. T. and
officers of the former Society of De
; signing Engineers, the new affiliated
1 body, will attend the conference here
tomorrow with Mr. Lewis.
ence for a design more open in charac
ter, possessing in silhouette relatively i
low, long, horizontal lines, harmonizing
in architectural character with the
lightness of the design of the White j
House, and with the principal axis kept.
open or at least partly so."
Maj. Clarke emphasized the im
poitanre of this situation to Washing
ton and quoted the commission's let
ter of March 26 to Chairman Boylan
as follows: "The Commission of Fine
Arts earnestly hopes that before final
action is taken, with respect to so im
portant an element in the plan of
Washington, an exhaustive-and thor
oughly adequate study of the whole
situation may be made. It was nine
years after McKim made studies for
the Lincoln Memorial, the Memorial
Bridge and the water gate that Con
gress authorized the Lincoln Memorial,
j Time should not be the essence of a
, great memorial project in Washington,
| more particularly when that project is ;
of sufficient importance to qualify for
the last great site in the composition i
of the Mall.
“In the Judgment of the Commis
sion of Fine Arts, a more fitting me
morial than a Pantheon should be
sought if the Tidal Basin site is to be
adopted. Mr. Pope used this form in
the Archives Building and as the re
sult feature in the National Gallery
of Art, now under construction. It
appears, therefore, that a design of
greater freshness would more ade
quately honor Jefferson.”
Serving on the Fine Arts Coinmig- |
sion with Maj. Clarke are Charles
Moore, who for many years was its
chairman; Henry R. Shepley, Eugene
F. Savage, William F. Lamb. Chailes
L. Borie, Jr., and Paul Manship. Each
is eminent in his own field—land
scaping architcture, painting or ar
chitecture. H. P. Caemmerer is the
commission’s executive secretary. The
members are appointed by the Presi
dent.
Scientists Hope to Fire Rocket
100 Miles Into Stratosphere
By the Associated Preas.
PASADENA. Calif., April Frank
J. Malina and three young aeronautical
student-scientists are completing
equipment here to test stratosphere
rocket motors.
“Data from these tests, together with
that obtained in experiments by Dr.
R. H. Goddard, E. Sanger and the
American Rocket Society, will be used
as the basis for developing a motor
which it is hoped will take a sounding
rocket nearly 100 miles above the
■earth's surface,” Mr. Malina said today.
He sees the rocket as a passible new
scientific instrument for the weather
forecaster and for obtaining cosmic
radiation records and information for
astronomers. The greatest height to
which scientific instruments have been
carried by sounding balloons is around
110.000 feet, less than 20 miles.
The motor in the test setup, at the
Guggenheim School of Aeronautics,
California Institute of Technology, is
a combustion chamber in which a mix
ture of gaseous oxygen and ethylene
bums at 5.000 degrees Fahrenheit, a
temperature about half that of the sun.
The flaming gas comes out of the
t
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exhaust nozzle at terrific velocities, Mr.
Malina said, a speed of 11,000 feet a
second having been reported by one
European experimenter. A "step
rocket," one with three motors and
propellant units, two of which would
be released In flight, would reach a
possible velocity of 11,000 miles an
hour.
"Although tests are now being car
ried out with gases,” said Mr. Malina,
“the sounding rocket will have to use
liquids. If the rocket is to travel high,
at least seven-tenths of its total weight
must be propellants of high destiny.
"One rather difficult problem re
quiring study is that of keeping the
rocket in vertical flight.’’
Mr. Malina said theoretical studies
have shown the decrease with altitude
of the earth's gravitational pull will be
a favorable factor in reaching greater
heights.
N.B.C.’$1937 PROFIT
IS PUT AT 13.700,000
"
Sarrioff, for First Time, Lifts
Veil on Earnings in
Broadcasting.
Bj the Associated Press.
NEW YORK, April 6—Extending a
welcoming hand to a proposed Federal
investigation of radio broadcasting
companies, David SarnofT, president
of the Radio Corp. of 'America, dis
closed yesterday Its own unit, the Na
tional Broadcasting Co., last year
turned in a net profit of approximately
$3,700,000.
Mr. SarnofT lifted the veil on R. C.
A.’s broadcasting earnings for the first
time in the annual stockholders’ meet
ing, held in one of the smart, up-to
the-minute broadcasting studios in Its
Rockefeller Center Building.
National Broadcasting, he explained
in reply to a shareholder’s questioning,
accounted for about $41,000,000 last
year out of about $112,000,000 in gross
income from all sources, including
manufacturing and communications.
Manufacturing profits, he said, were
more than $3,000,000, while communi
cations earned $1,060,000 net.
41 Cents on Common.
Previously the parent organization
had reported consolidated 1937 net
profit of $9,024,858, compared with
$6,155,936 in 1936. Profit was equal to
41 cents a share on the common stock,
held by 242.000 shareowners, against
20 cents in 1936.
Mr. SarnofT also revealed. In a
formal statement to some 400 men
and women who turned out for the
meeting, that R. C. A. had pushed
its program of national concentration
by selling for $1,750,000 cash last
February its investment in the British
controlled Canadian Marconi Co. The
buyer was the British Cables & Wire
ATTENTION!
Former Students of
Rider College,
Trenton, N. J.
Monday. April 11, H.tO PM. 7th Floor,
Securities Bide.. I.'.th St. N.W.,
meeting to organi/t* Rider Club in
Washington. Call. CL. 101.% tor fur
ther particular*.
less, with which R. C. A. has an agree
ment for mutual aid In their respec
tive spheres of activity.
R. C. A.’s total assets, Mr. Sarnoff
observed, now are approximately 94
per cent represented by Investments
in the United States, although It still
has patent licenses and engineering
service agreements with leading com
panies abroad and operates on a
world-wide basis.
Despite the business recession, he
informed stockholders, R. C. A. divi
sions remained in the black in the
first three months of this year and
net profits were estimated to have
covered preferred dividends, leaving a
small balance for the common stock.
The corporation, he said, was situ
ated to benefit from “an upturn in
general business, which we hope for
and expect in the course of the year.”
R. C. A.'s tax bill last year, he said,
totaled $4,297,500, in addition to
$1,531,461 In excise levies on radio
apparatus and messages collected for
the Government. All taxes, he added,
equaled 42 cents a share on the com
mon, or about as much as was earned
on the stock last year.
Darwin spent five years as a
naturalist on board a survey ship
in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans
before undertaking the scientific re
searches which made him famous.
LET’S GO!
IN A
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WE were pretty sure we had a great car
when some months ago we checked
the final blueprints on the 1938 Buick.
It had the new and mighty Dynaflash en
gine for sparkling action—the sensationally
desirable Toroue-Free Springing for a lullaby
of a ride.
Looking ahead in that promising day, we
figured we had every chance of getting our
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the buyer for his money.
Now, when times are sterner, it appears we
built better than we knew—we’ve got a car
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NEW DYNAFIASH ENGINE . . . put* cyclone* at
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th* tame rationing of futh
NEW TORQUE-FREE SPRINGING ... gentle* every
jar and jolt. . . reduoes skid-ricks . ,. makes
rear tires last longer.
This great new Buick was first introduced
to the public last fall. Through September,
October, November, it sold in steadily
increasing volume.
In a period when sales of other cars were
sliding off it went ahead, in one month actu
ally outselling one of the Big Three of the
lowest-priced field.
It’s still going ahead —not car Number
Seven or Eight, as one might expect by its
price-class, but one of the season’s Four
Best Sellers 1
There is only one explanation of such a
record when made by a car in the thousand
dollar bracket.
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Such a car is so good—has so much of value
in it—people just won’t do without it!
They buy it not only in preference to other
cars —they buy in preference to waiting for
easier times and readier money*to*spend!
That’s the convincing sort of car you’re
about to drive when you first take the wheel
of a 1938 Buick.
If you haven’t yet handled a new Buick, you
ought to—just to see what such a car is like.
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