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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 14, 1938, Image 57

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1938-04-14/ed-1/seq-57/

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STRANGE AS IT SEEMS
A^fT Of \1
CPiN &£ RUN6 IN
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DIFFERENT CHM65SI
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SetfoN CVER31
'/EARS Of CONSfANt
, zimmommi
\ ALUMPiRlATlOHS
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FRtDAY
ISMSoCAUtD
U>N6 FRIDAY, ,
ROLY FRIDAY ‘
ffjteJ^DW
•M
v jaih pum*
^oflVlVfcDONe qtmovy'z
6RBKWST MMQUfiiKES ?
IHWOpASStoMW-.
tT Hb&OfooDfoR |0 ceKTiiRi^
Ml
NAMPUrt
l Shoshone Indian renegade,
i hap feet xfh iNaes \jm
1 ANPfciHcrtt&wire/
' tm\‘XWtte o?'
m to$e, Idaho, omm
ifc.. $\oootmm*n,
Hi$ feet amp $cmp/
TOONERVILLE FOLKS
LIFE'S LIKE THAT
—By Fred Neher
; THE COl-OMEL.^
| fOgyrtflll l&Tby FrM mm)
■4-14- ■)*=}&.
"SURE. IT S LAST YEAR'S CALENDAR. . . . WE HAD SUCH A GOOD
YEAR, WE’RE USING IT AGAIN.”
MODERN MAIDENS
^ id iv
IWITV A t. AH
"LOOK AT THIS ELECTRIC BILL! NOW YOU’LL JUST HAVE TO
•TOP BURNING THE TOAST!”
PVERY inch a man wm Chief Nam
puh. Shoshone Indian, after whom
Nampa. Idaho, was named. Standing
8 feet 8'* inches tall. Chief Nampuh
I topped the scales at 300 pounds.
Yet Nampuh's greatest glory lay in
his feet. His name means "big foot,''
and. strang as it seems, his feet meas
ured no less than 17>* inches in length
and were 6 inches wide, according to
Prof. Brosnan of the American History
Department, University of Idaho.
So fast afoot was he that 80 miles
a day was not difficult. He usually
traveled on foot; his tribe following on
horseback Horse stealing, thievery
and murder figured among his crimes.
Consequently, white settlers of Idaho
were out to get him.
Nampuh's capture was deemed nec
essary to the successful and peaceful
growth of the West. Early settlers of
Fort Boise pasted a reward of *1,000
for any one who would bring back
Nampuh's scalp)—and feet!
Nampuh finally was captured and
killed by a highwayman named John
W. Wheeler, in July, 1868. In 70
years no one has disputed Nampuh's1
claim to immortality—his big feet.
Winning Contract
Bv THE FOLK ACES.
Unusual Strip Play.
J)AVID BURNSTINE Is noted for
his extremely careful play. On
this hand he sat South and held only
a queen and a jack. When his partner
put him Into a slam contract, It was
only by very fine dummy play that he
was able to make the hand.
West, dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
East-West not vulnerable.
A A 6 4
¥
♦ AKQ 7 5 4 2
A A K 5
AK AQJ10 8
¥ K Q J 10 N 5 2
763 WE ¥ A 8 4
♦ 8 3 S ♦ --
* 10 62 A J 8 7 3
A 9 7 3
¥ 952
♦ J 10 9 6
A Q94
Mr. Burnstine.
me bidding:
West. North. East. South.
4 V 4 NT Pass 5 ♦ |
Pass 6 ♦, Pass Pass:
Pass
After West's pre-emptive bid of i
four hearts, North made the conven
tional bid of four no-trump, a re
quest for Mr. Burnstine to bid his best
suit. Mr. Burnstine afterward con
fessed that he was tempted to pass
his partner’s bid because of his ex
tremely poor hand. He mustered his
courage, however, and responded with
five diamonds. To his chagrin, his
partner promptly bid six diamonds,
which was passed all around.
West opened the king of hearts,
which Mr. Burnstine trumped with
dummy’s queen of diamonds. Mr.
Burnstine then led a trump to his
jack, and ruffed a second heart with
dummy's king of diamonds. Return
ing to his hand with the ten of dia
monds. he now trumped his last heart.
He next cashed his three club tricks
and then led a small spade toward
dummy's ace. West played the king
and Mr. Burnstine was now faced with
the problem of determining whether
West originally held the blank king
or blank king-queen of spades. How
ever, West’s four-heart bid seemed to
indicate a seven-card suit. and. there
fore, a singleton spade. Mr. Burnstein,
therefore, let West hold the trick with
the king of spades, and West was com
pelled to lead a heart, which Mr.
Burnstine ruffed in his hand while
discarding a spade from dummy. The
slam was thus made.
It is interesting to note that only
an opening lead of the king of spades
by' West would have defeated the
slam contract. Also. East should have
made a sacrifice bid of six hearts and
taken a small penalty.
(Copyright. f»38.)
Solution to Yesterday's Puzzle.
LIETAIPM
meisaB
AlSiTiRpI
BOMBS a
By JOHN HIX| SERGEANT STONY CRAIG—Second Cosuolty
—By FRANK H. RENTFROW and DON DICKSON
THE FIRING HAsVBLADE/THATMEANS
STOPPED. THAT \ THE BANDITS WERE
BATTLE DIDN'T) SURPRISED AND
LAST LONG.y^BADLY BEATEN. j>
but rr doesn'tJTright, craig. they
NECESSARILY <1MI6HT REASON THAT
MEAN THAT THE/ IT WOULD BE BETTER
SOLDIERS ARE \\ IF WE DIDNT LIVE
FRIENDLY TO US A TO TELL ABOUT THE
^>^~^\BOMBING. i
I HIT TH* DECK ^
SOMEBODY^ FIRIN' J
ON US' s
ixT
THAT ms> WENDED --
FOR ME, CRAIG, AND ((UPPER LEFT
YOU STEPPED IN rf LEG. YOU GUYS
i «epooh«»meu
iHE GET YOU ? J I^SHOOT AGAIN.'
I r~T< ? -'
THE MOUNTAIN BOYS—
—By PAUL WEBB
Cfc-AH -EC WAHL-BUST MAM BOSTU ■'
gran’maw Groo^/- I ieetle puuy-MAV
WE HAS GOT" MARTIN GITTIN THE
SOMXHIN'TO 1 KHOT TIED AREADy-SHEfKS
TELL YA . WE DON'T 5EEM HAfcDL/ FlTTEN
IS A-G ITTIN* J you AINT MORE'N UALP^
> MARRIED C<»_ V/Ay GROW ED <
LVr « i ia -. n
U-ti J
' 1
SHE CATS— NoW AlHT THAT ROMA.NT1CAL
ITS TOOMER-SIL BEIH A DEAD
ALL. RKSMT. RIM&ER PER You WUEM you
WE'RE , \ WAS A YOUM& BUOA— AH
A-MARIM \RECROM HE'LL LOOK TEST
IT A \J-lRE you WHEW HE 6fTS
HALF HfTCH^L^ YORE A&E,TQ6MER . j""
/ DOES SHORE-HOME1/-CHILE./
/ YOU HE'LL BE "THE SPLITTIM'
ICfeALLV IMA6E O' TOOMER —■
I THINK AN' THAT'S A FAC* . ,
\ /-If-—J
/ WHAR AT- V HOME. AH RECKoM - U
I you A-&OIH ^ I MAYBE AH WAi ACTim' A
l puMY-MAy? Ikimda HA-sry after all . 1
^—.. —~ i-fjmaSa
| Copyright, 1*31.
I by £vc. • hej'jrti I-:.
LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE—When Yuh Gotta Go
—By GRAY
WHEE! MRS.
W.DEN-- ROSE-*
SHfcNGHM -
HERE THEV COME
WITH TH" STOVE
L.
' YES-AND IF \
YOU DON’T RUN
YOU’LL BE LATE
FOR SCHOOL
HURRY, NOW
TAKE OFF
vTDOG GONE rr!
[ WHY DO THEY HAVE f
| SCHOOL ALWAYS AT I
TH' SAME TIME ALL
\ TH' MOST EXCITIN'
I THINGS ARE HAPPENIN'?
j1 »V1> <fM. »'• ' It.
LEAPIN LIZARDS! THERE
GOES TH’ BELL - IF I'M
TARDY THEY'LL KEEP ME
AFTER SCHOOL AND I'VE
I harSld
6fiA'| - £
BEN WEBSTER'S CAREER—Sowing the Poison!
—By EDWIN ALGER
I'M AFRAID, MR. JIPPEM,' NOW, DON'T MAKE^
I DON*! SEE ANY A HASTY
POSSIBILITY OP A C*AL DECISION, MV BOY- j
BETWEEN US— -lr——-—>
THINK THE MATTER OVSR-YOU'RE 1
| YDUN6 IN BUSINESS-AND ANYWAY, 1
THIS RED-HEADED BCY, McGURK, IS I
APT TO PULL CUT ON TOU AT ANY /
tf'Vr—r'St
ryou to Ml
I Rt/STY'D |H TEMPT THAT*!
r?^? ) 7\ 'if '*
WELL. THAT BlT & POISON I
HIT THE YOUNO SQUIRT! IT '
JUST A SHOT IN THE DARK,
WOW! 6UESS THERE'S MORE*
ONE WAY TO SKJH A
CATJ
»y EDwtft AlXXk
"KEEPING UP WITH THE JONES"—What a Development!!
—By POP MOMAND
/ X'na telum' you, AL m'CjinisiA
J IP EPD'B HAS AniY <3©oFY <
/ NOTiOMS THAT HE’S CjOIMCx To L
naarry hay sister, daisy he
Ml&HT as well FOR&ETfHEM1
| X XJONl T Mifvixa MINA AS A
V 0OARDER-- BljT TO QE OnjE
\. OF TH' FAnAIL.Y'
p p^aprpNJEvER '■
'-/ MOTHimCx- CAM STAnDN
You'Re \( YH- WAY op TRUE H
HEALLY \\ U°V£ j AL '-XV\ CRAZY
SERIOUS K ABOUT
ABOUT ipAiSY!! ^ ^
CtOimjO O'-.
THRouCrM \ ^
WITH THIS. I
HUH 7 J
<# t»M, *y n» _I I
Daisy darunci
X 5IMPLY I
Tau< to you
Eli— X IJONi —
Want To —
Fere --- But
epDiE
^-7
/ i'm just whacky
ABOUT HiM.DEAIi!!; T£lX_
- - HOW CA.NI X S
<a£T HINH To PRoPGsg?
ME'3 SO-O-o-o-. Lk
Shy !!j J~
REG'LAR FELLERS—Getting Pinhead's Goat
Rim . I I I J -s
—By GENE BYRNES
rrm-■ — i
BUT YOJ CAN'T )
DEPOSIT A
COAT, J
Pinhead/ fj
WHY CANT I ^HE \
et the rr- |
DOLLAR BILL \
THAT AUNT MINNIE
gAVE ME f
THE NEBBS—The Busy Bee
1 M (
El U S Pet Office AH rifhu reeerved
—By SOL HESS
' MR. VAK4 MIDAS, MERE'S \
A VERV IMPORTANT
MESSAGE _ WAJOTS AM
^immediate amswer!/
f OOVJNJ 'X Cvvjd TELL.
Two POIMTS • SLiPPiNJG.y 'j?~> D. yu
SMALL. WE -SELI-" JmiLLIONI SHARES
ELU THEM TO SELL- A OP PEACE AMD
10,000 SMAR.ES- A \ COMTEMTMEMT 1
THOUSAMD AT A TIME V
AMD \WMEM IT DROPS )
ANOTHER Rive POiMTS A
BUY -S
f HERE'S A W ™U3R,WHAT WT, n. ^
" MESSAGE! 1 ^ uJWFMI^ixjRF \OlSTAlsiCE
WAS TOLD TO PvOJE MR
deliver just a ) il ,^D K AVAKI Midas
v,A|S VOU ^<>UR PlLLOwV_^*~ /-"L^
fa2?
I’#1 kv,v
• • l\ {TtiA* Mvk 111 V I Pit Off ♦■«) — J
•••• \ '^r' py -V.
MESCAL IKE—Or Left So Soon
—By S. L. HUNTLEY
Lolly Ga$s
’vueo L'^rtTG atri__
/ VMM\CM 'WOULD NOO 1
v seccm^smo
—/——mrrz&&

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