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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, April 25, 1938, Image 6

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RUG Beauty Our Duty
CHAN EO AND tTOftlP
Cal! Mr.Pylw na.)297 b
SANITARY CARPIT tr I
RUG CLIANINGCO. I
106 INDIANA AVE. g
Use Moorwhite Primer and Moore's
Outside Paint for a better jab.
922 N. Y. Ave._ No. 8610
TILE WORK
NEW OR REPAIR WORK
We vie Annotation Tile
EDWIN E. ELLETT
1106 9th at. N.W ft At 8731
not a I
cough
In a Carload
"Boned" Shad, Madrillon's seasonal
sea food delight, really has every
single "bonelet" removed. It's a rare
treat.
Freshly Caught
Freshly Broiled—Potomac Blver
‘boned* cec
shad 55
On the Luncheon 1
$1.00 on the Dinner
Restaurant
Maori lion
Washington Bldg. Dlstrlot 4981
15th and*N. Y. Ave. N.W.
If Your Dentist Hurts You Try
DR. FIELD
PLATE EXPERT
Double
V-s*
Suction
I guarantee a Tight Fit in an* Month
Violet Rax Treatment for Pyorrhea
Extraction* $1 St $2. Also Gas
Elates -$10 to
Gold Crown*_nn
Fillings _ $1 od
DR. FIELD
406 7th St. N.W. Mlt. 9256
Orer Woolworth 5e & lOo Store
NEW 7 lbs. 1938 I
Washing Machine I
Formerly Priced $79.95 I
REDUCED 1
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1328 N. Y. Ave. D^. 0145\
Established 48 Years Ago
I Take
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I Need Cash?
I Want it in a hurry? Want it with
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■ Diamonds. Watches. Jewelry. Guns.
■ Cameras. Musical Instruments, etc.,
■ at Lowest Rates Possible.
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r
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ft. table is ‘2 ft. 6 In. wide and %
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f 649-651 N. Y. Ave. N.W. f
1523 7th St. N.W. §
Not. 1348, "The Lumber Numb«r"S
PIONEERS WORLP’S (
AIR RO'UTES }
| Longines Watches pioneered
with Pen-American in establish
ing their "Clipper” route*
across the Pacific.'British
Imperial, Lufthansa and Pan
] American Airways, now prepar
ing to open trans-atlentic
passenger and mail service, all
use Longines Watches for
timing and navigating.
You can own a Longines Watch
of Aviation accuracy for as lit
tle as $40—es much as $4000.
IVES (PERIMENT
VERIFIES EINSTEIN
Torch-Bearing Particles of
Matter Give Evidence on
Time Theory.
By THOMAS R. HENRY.
Torch-carrying particle* of matter,
hurled through space as luminous
atomic watches at speeds of thousands
of miles a second and bearing evidence
compatible with the assumption that
the material universe is Immersed in
an all-encompassing stagnant sea of
ether, were reported to the National
Academy of Sciences, which started its
spring meetings here today.
Thirty years ago, Prof. Albert Ein
stein proposed this critical test for the
weird hypothesis of relativity that
Time stands still at the speed of light.
The actual experiment, hitherto con
sidered impassible, was described this
morning by Dr. Herbert E. Ives of
the Bell Telephone Laboratories, tele
vision and color photography pioneer
inventor.
At about the beginning of this cen
tury’ yvas made the Mlchelson-Morley
experiment, whieh was a turning point
in the history .of physics and of man's
whole conception of the nature of the
universe in which he lived. It showed,
supposedly beyond much possibility of
contradiction, that two beams of light
moving at the same speed covered
different distances in equal times.
At that time, space was supposed
to be filled with “ether," an hypo
thetical substance which permeated
all things and whose chief function
was as a medium through which light
and other electro-magnetic waves
could travel, Just as sound waves
travel through air. The earth also
was assumed to be moving through
this sea of ether.
Balls of Light.
Supposing a rubber ball is thrown
straight ahead from the top of a
moving train and bounced back from
some object straight ahead. The
train is moving toward the returning
ball. Consequently the thrower is
hit by it sooner than if the train
had been standing still, or if the ball
had been bounced against some sign
board beside the track.
The late Dr. A. A. Michelson ex
pected the same thing to happen
when he bounced balls of light
against mirrors in the direction of
the earth’s motion and at right angles
to it. He and every one else was
astounded when two light beams,
sent out simultaneously against mir
rors in the direction of the earth’s
motion and at right angles to it
“bounced back” and hit their starting
point at precisely the same instant.
The alternatives were to assert that
the experiment was in error or to
formulate a picture of the universe
in which such an apparently con
tradictory happening could take place.
The validity of the experiment it
self was widely, if not universally
recognized. One way of explaining
the weird results was by the cele
brated “Fitzgerald Contraction” hy
pothesis. This assumed that all di
mensions of a moving object contract
ed with the speed until at the speed
of light they were reduced to zero.
A yardstick, moving head-on at 100
miles an hour, would be a trifle
shorter than a yardstick standing
still and—the crucial point in the
experiment reported by Dr. Ives—a
clock moving at 100 miles an hour
would keep slightly slower time than
a clock standing still.
Dimensions Are Diminished.
This would be apparent to a sta
tionary observer able to watch the
moving objects. It would not be
apparent to an observer moving at
the same speed as the yardstick or
clock, because all his dimensions also
would be diminished. Everything he
measured would have the same di
mensions as before because both it
and the measuring instruments would
have shrunk exactly the same amount.
Thus the Michelson-Morley experi
ment was bound to have given a null
result because it took place on a mov
ing platform—the earth.
The theory was that this contraction
of dimensions was proportional to the
square of the ratio between the speed
of the moving object—yardstick or
clock—and the speed of light.
The speed of light is approximately
180,000 miles a second. Supposing a
watch, keeping perfect time, could be
shot from some super-cannon at a
speed of 20,000 miles a second, and
that its dial could be observed con
tinuously through a super-telescope.
The ratio between the speed of the
watch and the speed of light would
be 1 to 9, its square 1 to 81. Con
sequently, according .to the Larmor
Lorenz theory, the watch at the end
of one hour should be one-eighty-first
of an hour slow, or about seven-tenths
of a second, compared with a similar
watch in the hand of the observer at
the telescope.
Time Element Canceled.
Assume the speed of the watch to
be 90,000 miles a second, or one-half
the speed of light. Consequently, fol
lowing out the formula of the square
of the ratio, at the end of one hour it
should be one-fourth of an hour, or
15 minutes, slow. Prom this point on
the rate of slowing down of the watch
goes on very rapidly. When its speed
is 135.000 miles a second, or three
fourths the speed of light, it is nine
sixteenths of an hour slow. When the
speed is 144.000 miles a second, or
four-fifths the speed of light, the
watch should be sixteen-twenty-flfths,
or more than half an hour, slow. Push
the speed of the watch to 170,000 miles
a second and it is 299-324 of an
hour slow—practically standing still.
Finaliy the speed is increased to
180.000 miles a second, where the
ratio is 1 to 1. The watch records
no time at all. The time element has
been canceled out of physical phe
nomena.
It was impossible, of course, actually
to shoot a clock at any such speeds
Third Habeas Corpus Effort
Fails for Man Once Paroled
Proved Time Stands Still
The third effort by James P. Dono
van, who is serving a 10-year robbery
sentence, to obtain his release in
habeas corpus proceedings, failed in
District Court today.
Donovan was paroled in 1934 and,
according to all the evidence, was
“going straight" until newspaper crit
icism of his parole reached the little
town of Flora, lnd., where he was
working on a farm. The irate cit
izens of the town organized a posse
and drove him out on Christmas eve,
1934. He fled to South Bend, lnd.,
where he immediately reported to his
parole advisor.
Because another suitable situation
for him could not be found, however,
he was recommitted.
Justice Jennings Bailey held that
the recommitment by the Parole Board
was not arbitrary and hence could
not be reviewed by the court.
Hugh P. Rivers, executive secretary
of the Parole Board, testified that
Donovan was sent back to prison be
cause of “failure of the parole plan.”
The prisoner's attorney, James J.
Laughlin, put Commissioner George
Allen on the witness stand, but Mr.
Allen said he had no knowledge of the
case.
Assistant United States Attorney
Allen J. Krause represented the Gov
ernment .
Dr. Herbert E. Ives of the Bell Telephone Laboratories
shoum with the canal-ray tube with which he proved that
time stands still at the speed of light. He described his experi
ments today before the National Academy of Sciences, in ses
sion here.
and watch what happened. Prof.
Einstein thought of a way of doing it,
however, using as clocks the newly
discovered “’canal rays.”
Canal rays, first reported by the
German physicist Stark in 1906. ap
pear as streams of heavy, positively
charged particles of atomic propor
tions.
They are a bi-product of the pro
duction of X-rays. When a stream
of electrons from a negatively charged
electrode are hot against a target,
some of them penetrate deep into the
interior of the target's atoms, knock
ing other electrons loose from the
inner shells. These dislodged elec
trons, as they find places for them
selves in other atomic orbits, cause
emission of energy from the atoms.
This energy is X-radiation.
Constitute Back Explosion.
Some of the electron bullets, how
ever, go deeper into the planetary
system of th£ atom and set free
postitively charged protons. These
are attracted backwards at enormous
speeds towards the negative electrode.
They constitute a back explosion of
the atomic bombardment.
When splits are cut in the electrode
the positively charged streams go right
through them and can be caught on
the other side. They are known as
“canal rays” because of their pas
sage through these sills, or “'canals."
All the time the negatively charged
electrode Is sending out electrons in all
directions and some of these combine
with the positively charged particles.
When this happens light Is emitted,
known as 'recombination lumines
cense.” This light Is characteristic of
the element which Is reformed and
can be split into its wave lengths by a
spectroscope placed behind the elec
trode.
Dr. Ives then turns to the Doppler
effect, known for nearly 100 years.
Every element, when it is made
luminescent, sends out light with a
| distinctly characteristic spectrum made
up of wave-lengths emitted by no
other element. Because of this
; chemists are able to detect almost in
| flnitesimably minute amounts of any
i particular element in a combination
, for if one of the characteristic wave
lengths appear in the spectrum it is
indisputable evidence that the element
is present in the source of light.
Spectrum Lines Shifted.
But if the source of light is moving
these spectrum wave-length lines are
shifted slightly to the right or left
toward the red or violet ends of the
spectrum. If It is moving toward the
spectroscope the shift is in the violet
direction, and if it is moving away
the shift is toward the red. The de
gree of the displacement in either
direction is proportional to the speed
of the source of light. By this means
astronomers can tell the direction and
speed of movement of stars millions of
light years distant in space. This is
the Doppler effect.
Now the spectrum of the “recombi
nation luminescense" coming from
atoms moving at enormous speeds also
shows the Doppler effect but in the
past this has been practically impossi
ble to measure because of the various
speeds at which the particles are
moving. These measurements were
made passible by a new canal ray tube
recently perfected by Prof. A. J.
Dempster of the University of Chi
cago.
In Dr. Ives’ experiment each canal
ray particle constitutes a moving clock.
Its speed and direction are measured
by the shift in the spectrum of the
light it emits, just as the rate of a
clock is determined by the position
of its hands on the dial. Knowing
the speed of the moving particles and
their direction, the amount of this
shift can be calculated. With the
new apparatus Dr. Ives was able to
find this predicted shift, an extremely
minute one, within the limits of ex
perimental error. He measured very
accurately the shift of one wave
length—the blue line of hydrogen
gas which is a standard in spectrum
measurement because it is so promi
nent.
His apparatus could be oriented so
that the direction of the particles
would travel in the direction of the
motion of the earth or at any angle
to it and their luminescense reflected
back to the spectroscope. In effect he
might be considered as bouncing rubber
balls of time from the top of a mov
ing train—the earth. He found that
the spectrum shift remained precisely
the same regardless of the direction of
the back-bounce.
Thus his experiment turns out the
same as did the Michelson-Morley ex
periment with light beams and more
over into the fantastic contraction
hypothesis, thus verifying Einstein's
30-year-old prediction. The atom
watches actually slow down with speed.
SENATE REPORT
Unemployment Committee
Minority Supplements
Attack on New Deal.
Minority members of the Senate
tfnemployment Committee supple
mented a sweeping attaek on adminis
tration policies with a nine-point pro
gram of recommendations in a report
released today. Signatures of Senator
Lodge of Massachusetts and Senator
Davis of Pennsylvania, both Republi
cans, were attached.
The nine-point summary follows:
1 Repeal of undistributed profits tax
and modification of capital gains tax
as proposed in Senate tax bill and
general tax reduction wherever pos
sible.
2. Treat business men fairly, as they
are the best hope for new jobs. The
duty of encouraging that which is
good in business is just as binding on
Government as the duty of punishing
that which is bad. Give business
stable conditions and jobs will be
created overnight.
3. Congress should stop wasting its
time over such schemes as the Supreme
Court and reorganisation bills and
devote itself to unemployment and
relief—problems which will always be
with us.
End Exemption*.
4. Eliminate tax-exempt securities
and reduce at once the unnecessary
and burdensome social security tax _in
order that the employer and employe
may have more of their own money to
spend in their own way.
5. A true unemployment census as
a basis for a scientific treatment on a
national scale of the question of
i wages and hours.
fi. End executive discretion in tariff
matters and return to Congress con
trol of the currency.
7. Prepare for reorganizing the
agencies of unemplovment and relief
in order that quick and definite action
may be taken under a greater measure
of local control, in accordance with
the principle of greatest need.
8. That In the future the commit
tee hear all persons of standing who
have constructive criticisms of the
operations of the present unemploy
ment relief system.
9. If our statesmanship 1s not to
advertise itself as hopelessly bankrupt,
the time to act is—now.
Frightening Policies.
First of the itemized ’complaints of
the minority members was directed at
the "extravagant utterances, in which
whole classes of people are insulted
and nameless individuals are lam
basted over the radio instead of being
prosecuted in the courts." Such prac
tices, it was said, "tend to frighten
the business men."
The report dealt at considerable
length with the refusal of Committee
Chairman Byrnes to call a Mr. White
hurst, former chief of the correspond
ence division of the W. P. A., and
Stanley High, one-time administra
tion adviser, to testify concerning
W. P. A. procedure.
PINNED UNDER CAR
Suspension Chain Breaks While
Man Works Beneath Auto.
V. L. Reed. 48, Vienna, Va., was
injured yesterday when a chain sus
pending his automobile broke while
he was working underneath the car
at the Crane Service Co., 1042 Twenty
ninth street N.W.
At Emergency Hospital he was said
to have a broken collarbone, two frac
tured ribs and perhaps a punctured
lung.
JAMES EDWARD JOY
DIES AT HOME IN D.C.
Services for Betired Funeral
Director Will Be Held
Tomorrow Morning.
James Edward Joy, 75, retired
funeral director, died yesterday at
his home, 2906 Nichols avenue S.E., i
after an illness
of about two
months.
A native of
Maryland, Mr.
Joy formerly was
in the funeral
directing business
In Hughesville,
Md., and moved
the business to
Washington in
1900. Since retir
ing, the business
has been carried
on by his son, J.
Frank Joy. Mr.
Joy was a mem
Mr. Joy.
ber of the Masonic Fraternity.
Besides his son he leaves his widow, {
Mrs. Emma E Joy: three daughters, j
Mrs. Spencer H. Nutweli, Mrs. Ray T.
Jenkins and Mrs. Walter G. Fuller; i
14 grandchildren and nine great- |
grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held at 10
a.m. tomorrow in the Esther Memo- |
rial Episcopal Church. Congress!
Heights, D. C. Burial will be in St.
Mary's Cemetery, Woodville, Md.
Cotton Men to Meet.
AUGUSTA. Ga„ April 25 —
Problems of the Southern cotton man
ufacturers will be discussed here Fri
day and Saturday at the forty-second
annual convention of the American
Cotton Manufacturers’ Association.
Cotton consumption, wages and
hours, labor movements, new uses
for cotton and latest manufacturing
methods will be studied by delegates.
I, 000 DOGS TO VIE
IN D. C. CLUB SHOW
Gary Cooper Expected Mo
Attend Capital Kennel
Event Saturday.
The entry list now is well over 1,000
for the National Capital Kennel Club
dog show Saturday at the Packard
Auditorium, It wa> announced today.
Many prominent dog owners are
expected, it was said, including Gary
Cooper, motion picture star; James
J. Walker, former Mayor of New York
City and Mrs. Walker, and Miss Laura
P. Delano, cousin of the President.
Saturday was the deadline for en
tries.
Among prominent people from out
of town who will be on hand to com
pete for prizes and honors are Mr.
and Mrs. A. Biddle Duke, who will
show their pointers and setters, from
Tuxedo Park, N. Y.. and Mrs. White
house Walker of Bedford Hill, N. Y.,
with her poodles. Another exhibit of
poodles will be that of Mrs. Sherman
Hoyt of New York. Miss Marie
O'Leary of Greenwich, Conn., who has
trained many German shepherds for
the SeeJng Eye, will have several of
her dogs in the obedience test classes
of the show. Mrs. Hos tetter Young's
boxers will be here from Long Island,
N. Y.
Showing the great variety of en
tries from Washington among the
hundreds here who will take part are
the dachshunds of Dr. Louis Cornet,
Mrs. Jere Mackle’s cairn terriers, the
fox terriers of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon
Louck. Shetland sheepdogs entered by
Mrs. Ruth Tavnton, Dr. William
Compton's German shepherds, the
borzio of Mrs*- Robert Watson. Leo I
Murphy’s white collies, terriers of i
various breeds entered by Mr. and j
Mrs. R. L. Scaggs, and Dandle Din- !
monts of Mrs. R. H. Johnson.
Among those in the contingent
coming over from Baltimore to take
part in the show are Miss Betty
Barnwell, Mrs. James Frew. Miss
Marie Melcher, David Green, Dr. I
Helene Green. Mrs. Rosalyn Terhune,
Miss Elinor Cooxall Whitehurst, Mr. I
and Mrs. William Anderson. Mr. and 1
Mrs. J. L. Councilman, Miss Ada M. j
Feulner. Joseph Smith. Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Downing, Dr. and Mrs. Charles
Beisel.
UNo more CORNS
flf/ Safe, Instant Relief
It’s no longer necessary to suffer
from corns—or even have them if you use
Dr. Scholl's Zino-pads. These soft, soothing,
healmf, cushioning padi end pain of coma instantly.
Put them on tore toes caused by new or titht shoes
and you’ll atop corns before they can develop! The
eeparate Medication included in every box quickly
removes your corns or callouses. Oct Dr. Scholl's
Medically Sale treatment today. Costa but a trifle.
Sixes for Corns, Callouses, Bunions, Soft Coras.
h=———————
LETCH IPSO
yOl/R WEEKLY WASH TO
DAZZLING WHITENESS.'
HAPPY washdays are here! For the
amazing "shampoo action” of
- Chipso Wonder Hakes takes the hack
! ache out of washing—makes clothes
sparkling white —makes you marvel
how easy uashdays can he!
This amazing shampoo can change
your whole feeling about washing . ..
it’s that different! With power that is
gentle but sure, Chipso Wonder
Flakes penetrate right into the very
pores of the fabric—speedily washing
dirt away. That’s why, when you sham
poo your clothes in Chipso—your fin
gers aren’t stiff, your back isn’t weary
from hours of rubbing and scrubbing!
Chipso contains certain fine oils —
exactly like those found in many ex
pensive hair shampoos. These help
Chipso to fill vour tub with 25% more
suds, in 30% faster time! If you want !
white things to dazzle ... if you want !
your prints to sparkle—ask for Chipso
Wonder Flakes, today!
WONDER
MOTH PROOF
STORAGE
Fur - trimmed Coats, Fur
Coats, Fur Scarfs, Evening
Wraps . . . Store them all
in our modern storage
vaults. There is no extra
charge of any kind!
Women's Coats and Suits, without fur;
men’s suits /md overcoats stored for only
$1 each. Delivered to you carefully pressed.
Blankets and other woolens stored at bar*
gain prices.
Fur remodeling and repair estimates given
in your own home.
I
W
V i
AT LAKITIC 2 4 00
YOU MUST HAVE YES, AND I'M ON .
SAMPLED PIP MY WAY TO THE
FOR BREAKFAST» GROCERS FOR
w A FULL-SIZE
«.PACKAGE!
TV"'
*7 CONVENIENT
LOCATIONS
Im 18th & HAMLIN
H STS. N.E.
620TGA7AVEr^
T646 GaTaVE. ^
5010 isrST?^N?W.
MSwm H i 3228 Wisconsin
ave.
wTTaassTavl
■REuSQi^HHI CLARENDON, VA.
Prices effective in A&P Self-Service Stores in D. C. ond Vo. until closing
Wednesday, April 27th. We reserve the right to limit quantities.
BOKAR Shredded
COFFEE RALSTON
2 ill' 41e 2 box“ 21c
Maxwell II BORAXO
HOUSE I Cleans Dirty Hands
Coffee J?, 2 5 * Cln 11'
Tomato Juice - 9*1
N. B. C. BE LUXE ASSORTMENT... «■ 29c
ALASKA PINK SALMON. 2 s 23c
SLICED PEACHES.2 JSL 15c
GRAPEFRUIT JUICE..19c
GRAPEFRUIT SECTIONS..3 K 25c
FRUIT COCKTAIL «v«onte.^^,!i23e
BEAN HOLE BEANS .3 23c
APPLE SAUCE ma&w'hSf&S,..3 £.* 17c
BLACK FLAG INSECTICIDE. * 23c
CUT-RITE WAXED PAPER. “f 14c
KRAFT MACARONI DINNER.*. 15c
POST BRAN FLAKES.>»- 9c
A&P GRAPE JUICE.& 23c
SOUR OR DILL PICKLES.& IOc
PHILLIPS’ SOUPS S:X varieties_2 1 9c
YUKON CLUB BEVERAGES... SiSr 23c
WOODBURY’S FACIAL SOAP_2 - 15c
JUICY, TENDER STEAKS
ROUND_Tm 25c 727*
SIRLOIN.'b 33*
PORTERHOUSE. - - »>• 35*
—LAMB VALUES— I RATH'S
SHOULDER ROAST.. .»■ 14c CL^ERE
SHOULDER CHOPS.. ■» 17c stKei » 21*
BREAST OF LAMB .. . » 8c ~ s„„.yMd
FANCY LOIN CHOPS. » 33c bacon
TASTY RIB CHOPS.. •»■ 26c 2 ** 25c
HERRING j Sliced i Cip’n John’*
ROE Halibut FILLETS
Fresh 23® 21® 15®
TENDER STRINGLESS
GREEN BEANS 4» 19*
fresh CARROTS cSfii. 2 9c
Rhubarb lettuce 2«-i9c
O.. ife ORANGES Valtncia 2 33c
* - ,w APPLES Virginia Winetap 5,b*- 12c
t «, I _

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