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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 01, 1938, Image 15

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1938-05-01/ed-1/seq-15/

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\Miss Lenroot Urges Sane View
On Subject of Childbirth
j Bureau Chief Em phasizes
z Problem of Shrinking
Population.
By PAULINE FREDERICK.
: America must approach the subject
j ©f childbirth sanely and with greater
; Interest if child lives are to be saved
1 and our growing problem of a shrink-'
• Ing population is to be met.
; These, in substance, are the views
j of Miss Katharine F. Lenroot, chief
• of the Children's Bureau, on the eve
I Of Child Health Day.
I In her own words:
• *'A declining birth rate makes the
; saving of infant life more important
j every year. Our greatest effort must
• be directed toward saving life at the
; source. The May Day-Child Health
j Day slogan this year is 'Speed Chil
| dren on the Road to Health.’ This
1 does not mean doing a hasty job of
j child health protection. It means get
; ting the child off to a good start, lay
; lng firm foundations, promoting sound
‘-measures of health protection through
•every phase of childhood.’’
Vitally Interested.
J This is the program that stretches
| ahead of the woman, who. since De
cember 1. 1934. has been staying long
j hours at her desk to help devise ways
land means of giving America's millions
; of babies and their mothers a better
j chance in life. You don't have to ask
j why she is so vitally interested in her
; subject. She volunteered her reason.
; Here it is:
. "Individual life is more imjxirtant
; today than ever before. Our very
;civilization is based on the importance
I of the individual. We must start
‘with the health and well-being of
;the child*if we are to have such a
! society.”
; Making ready to strengthen the
lAttack on the biggest problem facing
the Children's Bureau—the further
extension of services for the health
end well-being of children and moth
ers, especially before and at birth
end immediately after—Miss Lenroot
finds an aid in the film "The Birth
Of a Baby.”
"The picture will help to increase
public interest in this important sub
ject." she declared. There are pre
sented, in a very fine way, the es
sential facts that everyone ought to
know."
Sees Hard Road Ahead.
Although much progress has been
made in child health work since the
Inauguration of Child Health Day
two years ago, and the adoption of
the Social Security Act, Miss Len
root sees a long hard road ahead.
"There must be a reduction of the
high maternal mortality rate," she
declared.
"There must be a reduction oi the
Infant death rate, especially in the
first week and month of life In
this connection, we need to devote
more attention to the care of prema
ture babies.
“There must be more widespread
protection of children agamst com
municable disease. Increased atten
tion must be paid to the nutritional
needs of children. A large proportion
of children suffering from physical
handicaps must be brought under cor
rective care. There must be a general
support of high standards of service
and larger appropriations for State
and local health agencies."
Miss Lenroot recalled there achieve
ments:
"One of the things that encourages
me most is the aroused public aware
ness of the need for health protection.
"Another cause for rejoicing is the
-extensive co-operation in promoting
; child health. All 48 States, Alaska,
i Hawaii and the District of Columbia
jare now eo-operating under the ma
■ ternal and child health’services made
; possible by the Soria! Security Act.”
• (Ccpyrieht. 193«. hy the North Amerltan
; Newspaper Alliance, Inc.)
• -«
j Over 7.000 banked bends have bepn
• built in Britain's highways in a year.
MISS KATHARINE F.
LENROOT.
FIRST NAVY HOME
STILL A MYSTERY
Department, 140 Years Old,
Uncertain Where Original
Quarters Were.
Looking forward to a new home
on tht> banks of the Potomac River,
west of the National Institute of
Health, as projected in President
Roosevelt's Government Building
Committee, the Navy Department yes
terday quietly observed its 140th anni
versary.
Officials recalled that, the depart
ment was created by Congress on
April 30. 1798. But after all these
years there is still one thing puzzling
the authorities—Just where the tem
porary quarters in which the new
department w^s housed during its first
three years of life?
In 1801. the department said yes
terday, the organization was moved
into the old War Office, located near
the White House, on a site now occu
pied by the southern end of the State
Department Building.
Although the War Office was de
stroyed when the British, in 1814.
burned the National Capital, most of
the naval archives and other valuable
papers were transported to a safe spot
in Georgetown.
The War Office was reconstructed
in 1816 and utilized to house the State,
War and Navy Departments. When
the former departments shifted into
! new quarters four years later, the
Navy became the sole tenant of the
building.
In 1879 the Navy moved into the
; east wing of the new State. War and
Navy Building, and there the greater j
parr of the department was housed
tmtil the World War. With the tre
1 menrious expansion then experienced,
; the Navy Department in 1918 moved
, into its prerent home on Constitution
1 avenue between Seventeenth and
. Nineteenth streets N.W.
Plans of the National Capital Park
and Planning Commission provide that
between the new Navy Department I
and the Potomar River, abutting the
Rock Creek and Potomac parkway,
there will be a naval museum to house
many fo the relics that is the service's
heritage through the years.
GOVERNMENT IS PUBLISHER.
One of the largest printing estab
lishments in the Nation is the Gov
ernment Printing Office, which spent
$5,350,000 in 1937 on paper alone. [
Among its larger jobs last year were
40 000,000 copies of a Social Security j
form and 6,500.000 copies of a Post
Office form.
AMAZING TONI!
OF THE
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I EARLY AMERICAN I
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