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Evening star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, May 08, 1938, Image 20

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JECATUR HOUSE
“ DRIVE LAUNCHED
Civic Leaders Hope to Save
Naval Hero’s Home as
National Shrine.
•Save the Decatur House” is the
glogan of a movement sponsored by
Secretary of the Interior Ickes to pre
serve as a permanent national historic
monument one of the famed land
marks of old Washington.
Built on Lafayette Square in 1819
by Commodore Stephen Decatur, for
mer commander of Old Ironsides
and hero of the war against the Bar
bary pirates, the house has stood
unchanged all these years. It can
not forever resist the tide of progress
that has wiped out other historic
landmarks on Lafayette Square, for
unless it is saved by public spirited
citizens, it must be sold to settle the
estate of the late Truxton Beale.
A few years ago American school
Children pooled their pennies and
saved Decatur's ship, thb Constitution,
from the scrap-heap. Recently the
house where Decatur died from the
wounds he received in a duel at
Bladensburg. Md., was selected by the
Advisory Committee of the Historic
American Buildings Survey as one
worthy of careful preservation.
Secretary Ickes, at the suggestion
of civic leaders who have sought to
prevent the demolition of the Lafay
ette Square house, initiated a move
ment last week to save it. He said
yesterday that he hoped funds would
be raised to purchase the property
and have it turned over to the perma
nent custody of the National Park
Service. Should this movement fail,
he Indicated there is a possibility of
the Government itself acquiring it.
May Organize Commute*.
“There is every disposition on the
part of Mrs. Beale, the present owner,
to be more than generous in the dis
position of the property for his
torical purposes," Secretary Ickes said
after a meeting Tuesday night. “It
is my hope that such a movement
may be immediately begun."
As a result of the meeting, which
was attended by Federal officials and
Interested civic leaders, a committee
probably will be organized.
Decatur House was the first private
residence built on Lafayette Square
after the erection of the White House.
It stands on the southwest corner of
Jackson place and H street N.W. Into
its construction went prize money
awarded the young naval hero from
the sale of the pirate ships he cap
tured. During the century that has
passed, it has been swathed in the
romance and grandeur of by-gone
days.
The house was designed by Benja
min H. Latrobe. one of the early plan
ners of the Capitol Building and archi
tect of St. John’s Church on Lafayette
Square.
Famous Men Lived There.
Decatur and bis young bride had
lived in the house scarcely a year
when he was brought home mortally
wounded on March 20, 1820, from his
duel with Commodore James Barron.
Decatur was at the height of his ca
reer, and his residence was a center
of social life.
After his death, many famous men
lived there. Baron Hyde de Neuville,
French Minister to the United States,
was the first to occupy it. Then came
Baron de Tuyll, a Russian Minister.
He was followed by Henry Clay, Sec
retary of State under President John
Quincy Adams; Martin Van Buren and
Edward Livingston, succeeding Secre
taries of State under President Andrew
Jackson.
In the roof are "lookouts” where
Negro slaves were posted during the
occupancy of Van Buren. Similar
ones on the White House roof made
possible a system of wig-wagging be
fore the days of the telephone.
Other famous persons who occupied
the mansion were Sir Charles Vaughan.
British Minister to the United States;
George M. Dallas, when Vice President
under President Polk, and John Gads
by. one of Washington's earliest inn
keepers. It was reported then that
Gadsby kept slaves confined in the
attic of the Decatur House for sale
in Washington's slave market.
Beale Bought Home.
The last tenant before the Civil
War was Senator Judah P. Benjamin
of Louisiana, wrho became Secretary
of State of the Confederacy. The
house was used by officers during
the Civil War, but at the close was
bought by Edward Fitzgerald Beale,
a Virginian, the grandson of Com
modore Truxton. Edward Beale also
began his career in the Navy and
won distinction in the Mexican War.
He explored the West and helped
found the State of California.
President Grant appointed Beale as
Minister to Austria-Hungary. His
son, the late Truxton Beale, was
formerly United States Minister to
Persia and to Greece. The historic
mansion, peculiar for its brick-sealed
windows on the H street side, is now
the property of his widow.
Within its walls the greatest men
of the Nation have passed during a
century.
Here Henry Clay formulated his
policy of "Good Neighbor” to South
America, and no one knows how many
other governmental policies were
hatched in its drawing rooms. Once
gossip abounded when Secretary of
. State Van Buren paved his path to
Queen
RULES OVER MICHIGAN
BLOSSOM FETE.
MISS DOROTHY McBRIDE
Of Kalamazoo, Mich., whose
scepter is a spray of apple
blossoms as she rules over the
1938 blossom festival being
held at Benton Harbor, Mich.,
and at St. Joseph.
—Wide World Photo.
the presidency through his entertain
ments in Decatur House for Wash
ington’s famous Peggy Eaton.
Those at Meeting.
In recent years, several attempts
have been made to preserve Decatur
House without success. Now, with
assurances of Federal interest and
support, another and, it is hoped, a
final movement has been launched.
Once established as a national mon
ument, this famous old house would
be maintained for future generations
by Federal funds.
The meeting Tuesday to discuss the
preservation of the house was attend
ed by Mr. Ickes, Newbold Noyes, as
sociate editor of The Star; Eugene
Meyer, publisher of the Post; Dr.
Charles G. Abbott, secretary of the
Smithsonian Institution; Allen C.
Clark, president of the Columbia His
torical Association; Mrs. Eleanor M.
Patterson, editor and publisher of the
Herald and Times; Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Woods Bliss. Francis S. Ron
alds, Arno B. Cammerer, director of
the National Park Service, and George
A. Mo6key. in charge of land acquisi
tion and regulations for the National
Park Service.
CAROLINIANS TO SEE
FASHIONS IN COTTON
State Society Ball on May 19 to
Be Featured by Display
of Products.
A fashion show in which cotton
garmerte will be worn by all the
models will bs the feature of a “Cotton
Ball'’ to be held by the South Carolina
State Society at Wardman Park Hotel
on Thursday night. May 19.
There will be exhibits, ranging from
papter to frocks, all made of cotton,
which will be given away as souvenirs
during the evening. Many leaders in
the cotton industry in South Carolina
are expected to participate.
Edgar Morris, president of the so
ciety, has appointed the following
committee chairmen: J. Austin Lati
mer, reception: E. D. Hodges, floor;
Charles E. Jackson, decorations and
display; Hugh E. Phillips, hotel and
music; Col. O. A. Hydrick, tickets, and
Mrs. Godfrey V. Wickward, publicity.
SOCIAL AGENCIES UNIT
TO INSTALL OFFICERS
Luncheon Meeting of Council to
Be Held Tomorrow at
Y. M. C. A.
New officers elected by the Board of
Directors will take office at a luncheon
meeting of the Washington Council
of Social Agencies at 12:30 p.m. to
morrow at the Y. M. C. A.
This will be the last meeting of
the organization until October. The
new officers are: Mrs. Harry Bern ton,
president; Dr. Thomas Gosling, first
vice president; Allen Pope, second vice
president, and Charles W. Pimper,
treasurer.
The retiring president, Dr. Russell
J. Clinchy, who has served for two
terms, will speak on “A Two Years’
View of Social Work in Washington."
The application of the Washington
Criminal Justice Association for mem
bership, recommended by the direc
tors, will be voted on.
RED CROSS ELECTION
Election of officers and directors of
the Prince Georges County Red Cross
Chapter will be held at a meeting of
the chapter's Board of Directors and
country representatives at 8 p.m.
Tuesday in the Bladensburg Firehouse,
it was announced yesterday by Dr.
C. P. Close of College Park, chapter
chairman.
The relation of the chapter’s work
with that of other county welfare
i groups will be discussed.
MODERN RIMLESS
GLASSES
Lenses and Frame A .45
Complete— O
If you want to "look your best" wear the
new modern rimless glasses. Complete
with any white single-vision lenses and
smart rimless mountings at 6.45.
Use Your Charge Account
Optical Dept—Street Floor
MR(§@@IL3D
avow. —mi miiyw VJ mmcMM
-Otlitf LonsbMifk Nows on Pogt A-19
i
District 7575
1 Gift Offer! 1.50 Value
Tussy Powder
and Lipstick
Junior Lipstick
Given with *Powder
You'll find Tussy's new; starch-free
Poudre Exotique clings delightfully
through the warmest days. The lipstick
is indelible ... a joy when you head for
the beach or lack time for new make-up’
Lansburgh’s—Toiletries—Street Floor
“Hawaiian
Paradise”
Washable Print
HOUSE
COATS
Made and Styled
in Hawaii!
1-99
Blooming with gigantic flowers
patterned after the lush growth
on the islands! Scores of color
fast prints . . . full bias skirts
. . . button-fronts. Gay for
the beach or to wear around
the house! Sizes 12 to 20.
£ Other Hawaiian Housecoats,
sizes 12 to 44_2.99
^ Lansburgh's—Cotton Shop—
Third Floor
Other Lonsburgh Newt on Page A-19
. - . • -
Ready Tomorrow!
Oar Second Floor Collection of Sommer
COTTONS
That You’ll Wear From “Sun-Up to Sun-Up"
One glance and you'll see why we're so proud of our picking! We chose
lemon yellow linens for broiling days . . . chic and sheer lawns to dine in
outdoors. Heady prints from California that will revive you even when
you feel most wilted. Plenty of commuters' crease-resisting spun rayons.
Cool frosty Swisses! Organdies! For dancing'with only the stars be
tween you and the night. We could go on, but pick 'em yourself tomor
row. Juniors, 11 to 17; misses, 12 to 20; women, 38 to 50.
A—10.95
A. Peek of polka dots for dancing at your favor
ite roof spot. Dramatic bolero 10.95
pique . . . misses’ sizes.
B. Creating quite a ban our exclusive bumble
bee linen from Hollywood’s
Mafjorie Montgomery. Misses’ 14.95
sizes .—.
C. California color In your life! Mexican crash
fitted jacket over a linen skirt. 1 A OS
Misses’ sizes, in our Sports Shop *
D. Cut a dash with a dirndl! Lovable tulip spat
tered pique. A Marjory Mont
gomery (exclusive in our Sports 1A BC
Shop). Misses’ sizes- *
E. Back to your school-girl charm! Princess
spun rayon coat-dress with pearl £ QC
button front. Juniors’ sizes- *
Lansburgh’t-—Second Floor ®
E—5.95
See
These Smart Cottons
Modeled on Our
Second Floor
Tomorrow
D—10.95
B—14.95
\
You’re hardest on stockings NOW!
C—14.95
69c ‘Economy” Chiffons
Clear and ringless
Excellently wearing
Save on your stockings! Right when you need it most,
for you're so much more active in summer. They come
in sun-flower, crab-apple, beach-tan, nasturtium,
roseberry. Colors to flatter your summer clothes.
Lansburgh’s—Hosiery Dept.—Street Floor
Glamor for Every Hour Under the Sun and Moon!
New Summer Rayon Fabrics
2JiOO Yards of Colorful Prints and Lovely Plain Color Fabrics, All 39 inches wide
• Printed Bemberg Rayon Triple
Shears
• Aerograph Rayon Prints
• Sunspray Rayon Hopsacking
• Printed Rayon Sports Pique
• Sanforized Printed Spun Rayon
• Rayon Alpaca Sheer Crepe
• Sharkskin Rayon Suiting
I Your Sowing Mo
i
$80 Electric White l
Sewing Machine l
Wolnut Finished £* O e50 1
Modern Console *T* 1
Style Cabinet I
Knee control . . • ^^ ‘a'nd|
complete set of attachments
exclusive White improved, co |
ient, modern sewing features.
$3 DOWN: Balance in convenient
Lantburoh's-Third Floor
Tubfast Cottons and Rayons
• Plain Colors • Cay Prints • New Weaves
• Sheer Printed
Seersucker
• Printed Crown Tested
Spun Rayon
• Printed Sifhouette
Chiffons
• Sanforized Printed
Pique
• Sanforized Rexshan
Prints
• Cruise Craft Prints
• Sanforized Swagger
Broadcloth
Lansburgh’t—Fabrici—Third Floor

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